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Full text of "Town of Wilmington Annual Report"

Town of Wilmington 
Massachusetts 




■■1 



3n fMemnriam 



Fred F. Cain 
Wilhelmina DeLisle 
David J. Dingle 
Troy Fields 
Lillian M. Woodside 



Index 



Title Page 

Accepted Streets 62 

Beautif ication Committee 69 

Board of Appeals 52 

Board of Assessors 10 

Board of Health 40 

Board of Registrars 14 

Board of Selectmen 2 

Boards, Committees & Commissions 7 

Carter (Sarah D.J.) Lecture Fund 67 

Cemetery Department 33 

Community Schools Committee 81 

Conservation Commission 25 

Constable 13 

Council on Aging 68 

Directory of Officials 6 

Dog Officer 87 

Fire Department 28 

Highway Department 30 

Historical Commission 44 

Housing Authority 34 

Inspector of Buildings 32 

Jury List 48 

Librarian 22 

Library Trustees 22 

Planning Board 20 

Police Department 26 

Public Buildings Department 21 

Recreation Commission 36 

Redevelopment Authority 29 

Revenue Sharing 80 

School Committee 70 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 35 

Shawsheen Valley Technical School 82 

Superintendent of Schools ■ 73 

Town Accountant 125 

Town Clerk 12 

Town Collector 15 

Town Counsel 16 

Town Engineer 29 

Town Manager 3 

Town Meetings & Elections Annual Town Meeting - March 5, 1977 88 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting - March 12, 1977 91 

Special State Primary - May 24, 1977 118 

Special State Election - June 21, 1977 119 

Special State Primary - August 2, 1977 120 

Special State Election - August 30, 1977 121 

Special Town Meeting - October 3, 1977 122 

Town Treasurer 11 

Tree Department 31 

Veterans Agent 87 

Water & Sewer Department 45 



1 



Town of Wilmington 
Massachusetts 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



To the Citizens of Wilmington: > 

One of Wilmington's chief attractions is the fact that life here has not become complicated to the point whj 
the average person cannot shape his or her own destiny. The people who have settled here have cherished Wi| 
mington's rural setting, but they have also dreamed of making constructive improvements, confident that by 
their own efforts they can better serve the needs of their families. During the past year the people of WU 
mington have been moving toward making their Town a better place in which to raise their families. The neen 
of youth have received particular attention. 

The Town Meeting reacted to a steady outcry from families in the Glen Road neighborhood and approved constrn 
tion of a sidewalk along Glen Road. As that sidewalk nears completion, the threat posed by vehicular traffj 
to school-age children is greatly reduced, although the street is still very narrow. 

The Recreation Commission has been studying the feasibility of developing a new outdoor recreation area on 
existing Town-owned land to meet Wilmington's need for playing fields. 

The young people of the Town responded during the past year by organizing public officials, businessmen and( 
private citizens to build a gazebo on the Town Common. The gazebo now stands as a tribute to the sensitiviij 
of the Wilmington High School Class of 1977. 

The Town's departments moved toward better serving our residents in several ways. The Fire Department now j 
has sixteen qualified emergency medical technicians to man the department's two ambulances, with two more i 
firefighters currently attending classes to become EMT certified. 

The Council on Aging expanded the hot lunch program for senior citizens by providing meals during the summej 
months. The Water Department participated in an experiment to test a new process for removing iron from th< 
Town water supply. 

Business and civic leaders throughout the region seemed to express confidence in Wilmington during the past, 
year. The Moody's Investor's Service, Inc., raters of municipal bonds, gave Wilmington a AA rating during li 
period when municipal bonds issued elsewhere were coming under considerable suspicion. 

The officers and membership of the Aleppo Temple of Shrine, the third-largest temple in the United States, 
chose to relocate their headquarters from Boston to Wilmington. The Regional Health Center of Wilmington, 
years in the planning stages, finally brought everything together and started construction of their facilit; 
on Salem Street. 

Two of Wilmington's larger and most successful industrial neighbors chose to expand their operations in Will 
mington. Analog Devices is presently constructing a 3.4 million dollar building on a parcel of land off 
Woburn Street, and Compugraphic is investing in a 1.6 million dollar addition adjacent to their present 
facility on Industrial Way. 

The people of Wilmington are forging ahead to create a better community for their families, confident of tl 
own abilities. This confidence is recognized by the business and civic leaders of the region who, in turn 
want Wilmington to be part of their future. 



Respectfully submitted, 




Aldo A. Caira, Chairman 
James F. Banda 
A. Daniel Gillis 
A. John Imbimbo 
Madelyn A. McKie 



2 



To w iv OF Wi L ivri iNj c> T o 

MASSACHUSBTTS OI887 



OFFICE OF THE ARC* COOC 6l7 

TOWN MANAGER 658-3311 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and Citizens of Wilmington: 

In the Budget Message for the new fiscal year, I reviewed a number of projects 
undertaken over the past few years by the Town and I would like to share this 
information with the Citizens who have chosen Wilmington as their home. 

Some, if not many, Massachusetts communities have to be dragged kicking and 
screaming into the twentieth century, as it relates to the conduct of the busi- 
ness of local government and, therefore, fail to recognize that a municipal 
government is a big, complex business involving, as in Wilmington, community- 
owned property, facilities worth $200 million, many hundreds of employees and 
an annual operating expense of 16 million dollars. This figure does not in- 
clude capital outlay cost such as the new $7 million sanitary sewer project now 
under construction. 

To review our progress in a few paragraphs, I first referred to a document which 
was presented to the Board of Selectmen, department heads, boards and committees 
in 1970, which was entitled a Statement of Objectives and Goals. This report 
contained the process of measuring success or failure in accomplishing the desired 
level and quality of progress in dealing with the major problems and needs of the 
community, and listed specific and general goals of the administration. The re- 
sults on some of these long-rang projects are listed in random order as follows: 

1) In the field of tangible products, is the administration producing timely, 
efficient services and a full report of all operations as required by law? 

A) We produced (one of the few available in the Commonwealth) a comprehensive 
multi-part annual Budget Report consisting of: 1) The budget document, 2) 
an inventory of all Town-owned equipment and vehicles, 3) a complete break- 
down of all employees by department and job title, and 4) a Zero-Base Budget 
Report has been added for the 1979 year. 

B) We require from each department head a monthly activity report outlining 
the work progress of each department. 

C) We request from each committee, commission and board, a monthly report of 
the minutes of their meetings to be able to review the work of these boards. 

D) We have centralized the bid process and purchasing function to assure the 
integrity of the bid process and to take ad^rantage of the State purchasing 
system. 

E) Each working day, I am in personal contact with at least five department 
heads to see that the work is being accomplished in each department. 



3 



F) In appointments of department heads, we have been very careful to select well-qualified, educated 
and experienced people for these positions in order to have them provide the Town a very high qual 
service. Ten of the major department heads hold advanced degrees in their field. 



In the field of recreation , we have appointed a very active Recreation Commission to assist the Recrea-* 
tion Director in developing a strong Town-wide program of recreation to serve all age groups to includei 
girls, women, boys and men. We have one of the best overall recreation programs in the State. 

In the field of senior citizens , and with the help of the Council on Aging and full time Coordinator, 
we have developed an extensive program of activities and events for our senior citizens with a drop-in 
center, senior citizens' bus service, and a hot meal program. 

In the library service , with the aid of a competent Board of Library Trustees and Library Director, we 
provide an educational and cultural service that cannot be matched in any other community of our size. 

In the field of health , with the assistance of the Board of Health and Health Director, we have developi 
ed our capability to assist our citizens in health care services and facilities. I believe we have 
accomplished many of our goals in this area by adding to our nursing staff, providing home care servicei 
to the handicapped and conducting numerous health care clinics. 

In the field of safety ; i.e., fire prevention and police protection, we have developed public safety 
capability in these departments to cope with the growing workload, by partial integration, automation, 
joint communication and other operating improvements. I have previously recommended the creation of a 
Director of Public Safety, as well as, a telephone recording system, to improve the vital services in 
the field of public safety. 

In the field of labor relations , we have developed multi-year labor contracts and a sense of pride, 
importance and satisfaction on the part of all Town employees as a basis to conduct successful labor 
agreements. I believe we have negotiated successfully and have achieved multi-year contracts which are 
reasonable and promote harmonious relations with our employees without the usual state arbitration 
awards or fact-finding hearings common in many other municipalities. 

In the field of community and economic development , we have promoted programs to protect the environmeni 
With the strong support of the Water and Sewer Board, we have been working in this direction by laying 
out some 14 miles of sanitary sewer, now committed to a contract using 5 million dollars of State and ' 
Federal funds, to prevent the contamination of our ground water resources. This project is also de- 
signed to bring high quality economic development for industrially-zoned land in North Wilmington to 
promote tax revenue. 

The true measurement of this objective can be found in examining over the past few years the percentage 
breakdown of the total tax input as it relates to residential and industrial property assessments. 

In 1977, industrial property tax income now amounts to 407o of the total tax revenue, which means that 
we are increasing the industrial tax base substantially which in turn relieves the tax burden of the 
residential property owners. 

In the field of fiscal management , we developed administrative techniques to control as much as possibli 
the direct cost on the property tax base by: 

A) Applying for State and Federal grants to provide funds which do not reflect upon the property tax- 
payer. This project for one year; namely, 1977, amounted to $250,000 received in services through 
the CETA Program from the Federal Government. 

B) Federal aid for specific municipal projects has been obtained during 1977 as follows: 

1) $100,000 for road reconstruction; 

2) $590,000 for water main reconstruction; 

3) $65,476 to provide help for a special project in the library; 

4) $52,289 to provide labor to rebuild a wellfield in the Water Department; 

5) $63,308 for labor to replace roadside guardrails, clean streams and cut brush in the Highway 
Department ; 



4 



6) $120,000 for labor to improve athletic fields on school property; 

7) $80,000 for labor to improve highway maintenance and drainage systems in the Highway Depart- 
ment ; and 

8) $78,000 to improve a new section of land in the Cemetery Department. 

C) The process of tax collection for each taxable year is strongly pursued, as well as excise tax 
commitments, so that in Wilmington the tax burden is equally shared. 

D) The tax title foreclosure process is strictly followed to include foreclosure through Land Court, 
which again is designed to equalize the tax burden. 

E) The Town went actively into the investment field, as well as analyzing monthly cash flow require- 
ments, (about 1/4 million per week) which result in considerable income from interest earned on 
the investment of available funds. The interest earned for any one year is money that does not 
have to be raised by taxation on property. 

F) To help analyze the fiscal and accounting practices and procedures, the Town hired the accounting 
firm of Price-Waterhouse of Boston to conduct an audit to which few municipalities would willing 
submit. We were given a high rank for an efficient operation and advised that modern management 
methods were being used in Wilmington. 

G) To measure the equity in our rates for water consumption, we hired the well-known firm of Coffin 
& Richardson of Boston to report on the cost of service allocations and rate structure in the 
Wilmington Water Department. The net result was a more equal distribution of the cost of water 
and a lower minimum quarterly water charge to the low water user. 

H) To analyze the fast-growing cost of all health, liability and property insurance, we employed 
the firm of D.A. Betterley of Boston, municipal insurance risk management consultants. As a 
result of this report, we put some of our insurance needs out to bid through our local insurance 
carrier, and we will obtain insurance coverage improvements in the future. 

10) A final category, looking back over the years, would include a long list of intangible products; intangi- 
ble to measure, but of great importance to the performance standards of our Town and of benefit to the 
citizen. Such a list would include also the involvement of citizen committees, department heads and town 
meeting voters who have supported such projects as: the industrial development of town-owned land by the 
W.R.A. , the acquisition of a Town Forest and conservation land, the upgrading and improvement to our Zon- 
ing laws. Town By-Laws, Subdivision Rules and Regulations, the adoption of the Official Map, Flood Plain 
Zoning, the microfilming of town records, extensive use of electronic data processing, voting machines, 
acquisition of property on Silver Lake and a new prospective on the financial condition of the Town of 
Wilmington which permitted us to retain a double A rating by Moody's Investment Service. 

These are some of the items which measure the performance of the local government accomplished by many 
concerned citizens and employees. 

I wish to acknowledge that the progress which has been made over the past year is due to the leadership pro- 
vided by the Board of Selectmen, and the services have been of high quality due to the professional attitude 
of our department heads and hard work by our employees. 

The Town of Wilmington will benefit most of all by your presence at the Town Meeting. 



Respectfully submitted. 




Sterling »C. Morris 
Town Manager 



5 



DIRECTORY OF OFFICIALS - January 1, 1977 - 1978 



Board of Selectmen 



Aldo A. Caira, Chairman 
James F. Banda 
A. Daniel Gillis 
A. John Imbimbo 
Madelyn C. McKie 



Term 
Expires 
1978 
1980 
1978 
1980 
1978 



Tovm Manager 



Sterling C. Morris 



Moderator 



John M. Callan 



Annually 



School Committee 



Linda T. McMenimen, Chairman 
Lester F. White, Vice Chairman 
John Brooks, Secretary 
Francis A. Ottati 
James A. Demos 
James D. Tighe 



1979 
1980 
1980 
1978 
1979 
1978 



Superintendent of Schools 



Walter H. Pierce 



Finance Committee 



Arthur F. Spear, Jr., Chairman 
Thomas E. Casey, Vice Chairman 
Joyce K. Brisbois, Secretary 
Richard D. Duggan 
Stephen J. Brennick 
John C. Clark 
David K. Cronin 
Anita Backman 
John C. Heine 



1978 
1980 
1979 
1978 
1980 
1979 
1980 
1979 
1978 



6 



BOARDS, COMMITTEES AND COMMISSIONS - JANUARY 1, 1977 - 1978 



APPEALS, BOARD OF 

Bruce MacDonald, Chairman 

William A. Caper ci 

George C. Robertie 

Louis J. Brozyna, Associate 

Dorothy E. Robbins, Associate 

Edward E. Thompson, Associate 

ASSESSORS, BOARD OF 

Anthony E. Krezeminski, Principal 

Charles P. Lawrenson 

Roy P. McClanahan 

BEAUTIFICATION COMMITTEE 
Paula O'Brien, Chairman 
Evelyn S . Burke 
Hugo Wiberg 
Joseph J. Cuoco 

250th ANNIVERSARY COMMITTEE 

Adele C. Passmore, Chairman 

Fructuoso T. Carrasco 

Robert S. Boyce 

Robert A. Brown 

John C. Clark 

Atwood E. Dickson 

David B. Hill 

Charles Kelley 

Joan Maga 

Marie Michaud 

CARTER LECTURE FUND COMMITTEE 
Madelon C. Slater, Chairman 
Julia Fielding 
Mildred E. Neilson 
Kenneth Wilson 
Frankline E. Allen 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 
Willis C. Lyford, Chairman 
Mildred M. Cavanaugh 
William H. Russell 



1980 
1979 
1978 
1978 
1978 
1978 



1979 
1980 
1980 
1978 
1979 



1978 
1979 
1980 



COUNCIL ON AGING (continued) 
Nema K. Miller 
James Shine 
Irving Storms 

HEALTH, BOARD OF 

Joseph A. Paglia, Chairman 

James J. Durkee 

Thomas W. Morris 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 
Adele C. Passmore, Chairman 
Foster B. Balser 
Frank D. Cur ley 
William G. Meyer 
Melinda P. Murphy 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

George W. Hooper, Chairman 

Lorraine C. Brozyna 

Barbara H. Larson 

Kevin J. McMillan 

Lulu E. Sanborn 

(Rep. of State Housing Board) 

INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 
Lionel M. Baldwin 

LIBRARY TRUSTEES 

E. Hayvard Bliss, Chairman 

Philip B. Buzzell 

Shirley F. Callan 

Evelyn M. Norton 

John S . McNaughton 

Anne Ballou 

PERMANENT BUILDING COMMITTEE 
Arthur R. Smith, Jr., Chairman 
Albert J. Blackburn, Jr. 
Joseph J. Hartka 
David A. Holbrook 
Edward E. Thompson 



1979 
1978 
1979 



1978 
1980 
1979 



1978 
1978 
1980 
1979 
1979 



1978 
1982 
1981 
1980 
1978 



1979 



1979 
1978 
1978 
1980 
1980 
1979 



1978 
1979 
1979 
1978 
1980 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Chester A. Bruce, Chairman 

Jacqueline D. Allaman, Vice Chairman 

Joan Sadowski, Treasurer 

Ursula M. Leahy 

Thomas J. McGinley 

Paul A. Rose 

Bruce A. Peters 

Ella Belmore, Clerk 

COUNCIL ON AGING 

Lorraine Brozyna, Chairman 

Gladys A. Babine 

Arthur Bernard 

Sheldon Maga 

Fenton P. Cogar, Jr. 

Arthur J. Daniels 

Rose M. Gatta 

Josephine M. Kelley 



1979 
1978 
1980 
1978 
1980 
1979 
1980 



1979 
1978 
1980 
1980 
1979 
1980 
1980 
1978 



PERSONNEL ADVISORY BOARD 
Richard V. Barry 
John F. Burke 
Richard K. Hayden 



PLANNING BOARD 



Chairman 



Louis A. Maglio, Jr. 
John DeRoy 
Walter P. Kenney 
Kenneth J. Miller 
William G. Hooper, Jr., Clerk 

RECREATION COMMISSION 
John P. Gushing, Chairman 
Paul J. Bova 
Lorraine M. Hanna 
Larry Noel 
Francis Sferrazza 



1982 
1980 
1978 
1981 
1979 



1979 
1980 
1978 
1980 
1979 



7 



REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY 

Raymond A. McNamara, Chairman 1981 

Carl A. Backman 1979 

Wilson J. Belbln 1982 

Sidney R. Kaiser 1978 

Currle N. Johnson (State Member) 1979 
Patricia Gately, Secretary 

REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Lawrence P. Flaherty 1980 

Frank H. McLean 1979 

REGISTRARS, BOARD OF 

Mary G. Condrey, Chairman 1980 

Robert L. Cavanaugh 1979 

Olin M. London 1978 
Priscllla R. Ward, Clerk 



Precinct 4 » 
William H. Russell, Warden Annua j 

Sarah H. Cosman, Dep. Warden 
Elizabeth Cavanaugh, Clerk 
Mary O'Rourke, Dep. Clerk 
Doris V. Russell, Inspector 
Marjorle C. Kennedy, Dep. Inspector 
Mary J. Johnson, Inspector 
Edith Cuoco, Dep. Inspector 

Precinct 5 
Jean LeFavour , Warden 
Dora C. Ardolino, Dep. Warden 
Mildred Hillier, Clerk 
Margaret E. Blonigan, Dep. Clerk 
Patricia Sunnerberg, Inspector 
Elizabeth A. Blalsdell, Dep. Inspector 



TOWN FOREST COMMITTEE 
Robert P. Palmer 
Kenneth C. Motschman 
Frank H. Tuttle 

TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS 
Arnold C. Blake, Chairman 
Harold E. Melzar 
Mary E. Denault, Secretary 

WATER AND SEWER COMMISSIONERS 
George R. Allan, Chairman 
Arthur R. Smith, Jr. 

WILMINGTON ELECTIONS OFFICERS 

Precinct 1 
Mary D'Eon, Warden 
Helen F. Sencabaugh, Dep. Warden 
Joan M. Lanzillo, Clerk 
Diane M. Pollzzotti, Dep. Clerk 
Clarice J. Ross, Inspector 
Alta Lyons, Dep. Inspector 
Edith Ann Graham, Inspector 
Dolores E. Romanski, Dep. Inspector 

Precinct 2 
Phyllis M. O'Leary, Warden 
Charlotte Stewart, Dept. Warden 
Evelyn S. Burke, Clerk 
Marjorle MacDonald, Dep. Clerk 
Miriam H. Colucci, Inspector 
Lorita B. Bower, Dep. Inspector 
Eleanor Doyle, Inspector 
Henrietta I. Bonnell, Dep. Inspector 

Precinct 3 
Stanley Webber, Warden 
Basil L. Weatherbee, Dep. Warden 
Loretta R. Caira, Clerk 
Alice G. Marcy, Dep. Clerk 
Mary E. Woods, Inspector 
Norlnne M. Markey, Dep. Inspector 
Florence A. Balkus, Inspector 
Barbara J. Buck, Dep. Inspector 



Precinct 6 

Margaret L. Perry, Warden 

Marie Butler, Dep. Warden 

Barbara M. Cook, Clerk 

Nancy C. DeWilde, Dep. Clerk 

Diane J. Ryan, Inspector 
1980 Patricia D. McNaughton, Dep. Inspector 

1979 Jean F. Howard, Inspector 

1978 Elizabeth Andrews, Dep. Inspector 

COMMUNITY SCHOOL STUDY COMMITTEE 

1978 Barbara Hooper, Chairman 

1979 Daniel H. Ballou, Jr. 
John Brooks 

David Cronin 
James J. Durkee 
Annually Carol Frost 

Charles Gilbert 
Richard Gorham 
Mary Kuchler 
Constance Miller 
Heather Moore 
Dennis Murphy 
Inez Murray 
Marcella Quandt 
Dorothy Robblns 
Charlotte Stewart 
John Virtus 
Mildred Wolff 
Alfred Antinarelll 
Patricia Gagnon 
Paul J. Lynch, Chief 
Ronald Swasey 
Lester White 



8 



OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS - JANUARY 1, 1977 - 1978 



\ccountant 
Animal Inspector 
\ssistant Town Manager 
Demetery Superintendent 
]ivil Defense Director 
;;onstable 

onstable 
)og Officer 

ngineer 

ire Chief 
;as Inspector 
lighway Superintendent 
Inspector of Buildings 

pswich River Watershed Commission 

ibrarian 

ledical Agent, Board of Health 

letropolitan Area Planning Council 

liddlesex Canal Commission 

lilk Inspector 

lurse. Public Health 

'lumbing Inspector 

ublic Building Superintendent 

olice Chief 

ecreation Director 

ealer of Weights and Measures 

own Clerk 

own Clerk (Assistant) 

own Collector 

o\m Collector (Deputy) 

own Counsel 

own Sanitarian 

own Treasurer 

own Treasurer (Assistant) 

ree and Moth Superintendent 

eterans' Agent 

'eterans' Grave Officer 

fater Superintendent 

ire Inspector 



Robert H. Peters 
Joseph V. Balestrieri 
Peter L. Holzmeister 
Francis E. Downs 
Silverius J. Blonigen 
James Edward Burke 
Arthur V. Lynch 
Joseph V. Balestrieri 
Robert L. Higgins 
Arthur J. Boudreau 
William R. Harrison 
Robert P. Palmer 
Charles P. Lawrenson 
Herbert D. Nickerson 
Philip W. Meriam 
Luisito Francisco, M.D. 

Madelyn A. McKie 
Stanley Webber 
Ernest F. Romano 
Anne Butters, R.N. 
William R. Harrison 
Roy P. McClanahan 
Paul J. Lynch 
Ronald Swasey 
Martin P. Farrell 
Priscilla R. Ward 
Kathleen M. Scanlon 
Marion C. Murphy 
Catherine P. Lindmark 
Alan Altman 
Ernest F. Romano 
Rachel M. Mtti& 
Elizabeth R. Fosgate 
Thomas 0. Sullivan 
Paul A. Farrell 
Paul A. Farrell 
Kenneth C. Motschman 
Charles L. Webster 



9 



Board of Assessors 



RECAPITULATION - 1978 FISCAL YEAR 



XU LaX n-pP LyJyi L J.a L J.iJilo \, i. dAd u JLC LI J 




nn 






23 




1 7A QLC\ 


D 1 




37 312 


00 


Elderly Lunch Program 


lo!l99 


00 


School Breakfast 


1,645 


00 


Free Public Libraries 


6,621 


00 


Special Education Grant Chapter 766 


28,648 


00 


Underestimate 


5 


00 


Amount Necessary to Satisfy Final Court Judgement 


85,156 


78 


Appropriation Overdrafts-Snow & Ice Removal 


55,792 


38 


County Retirement Assessment 


305,802 


00 


County Tax 


438,810 


33 


Underestimate 


60,138 


48 


County Hospital 


5,896 


03 


State Recreation Areas 


73,158 


77 


Metropolitan Districts Area Charge 


70,055 


33 


Mass Bay Transportation Authority 


228,000 


00 


Underestimate 


36 


32 


Motor Vehicle Excise Tax Bills 


1,930 


05 


Air Pollution Control Districts 


1,250 


35 


Metropolitan Area Planning Council 


2,524 


81 


Ipswich River Water Shed 


44. 


91 


Overlay of Current Year 


276,140, 


81 



Gross Amount to be Raised 

Less Estimated Receipts and Available Funds: 

1978 Fiscal Year Estimated Receipts from Local Aid 

and Agency Funds 
Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 
Licenses 
Fines 

Special Assessments 

General Government 

Protection of Persons and Property 

Health and Sanitation 

Highways 

Libraries 

Cemeteries 

Farm Animal and Machinery Excise 
Interest 

Ambulance Services 

Sewer Revenue 

Miscellaneous Receipts 

Workman's Compensation and Insurance 

Dog License Reimbursement 

Overestimates 

Voted from Available Funds 

Total Estimated Receipts 

Net Amount to be Raised by Taxation 



$ 2,157,672.31 
552,146.56 
7,000.00 
3,450.89 
30,784.60 
12,090.63 
19,692.75 
4,094.75 
754.50 
741.50 
9,775.00 
272.00 
111,731.22 
4,291.60 
78,503.19 
549.73 
1,606.60 
3,259.92 
11,094.57 
1,403,860.23 



$14,545,470.2 



1,864,107.9: 



$16,409,578.1; 



4.413,372.5.' 



$11, 996, 205. 6( 



10 



gcapitulation - 1978 Fiscal Year (continued) 



arsonal Property 
sal Estate 

Total Levied on Property 



$ 5,057,765.00 @ 80.00 per M 
144,894,805.00 (? 80.00 per M 



$ 404,621.20 
$ 11,591,584.40 
$ 11,996,205.60 



terns not entering Into the determination of the Tax Rate; 
Betterments and Special Assessments added to Taxes: 

a. Street Betterments and Interest 

b. Water Betterments and Interest 

c. Sewer Betterments and Interest 



12,459.75 
14,576.00 
12,309.71 



Liens added to Taxes: 



a. Water Liens 

b. Sewer Liens 



Total of all other commitments 



27,610.01 

290.37 

$ 67,245.84 

$ 12,063,451.44 



Town Treasurer 



Cash on Hand July 1, 1976 $ 2,126,166.92 

Receipts Fiscal 1977 26,537,260.56 

Disbursements Fiscal 1977 26,465,964.31 

Cash on Hand June 30, 1977 2,197,463.17 



iring calendar 1977, it was necessary to borrow twice (March and September) in anticipation of revenue, 
lile we have revenue anticipation notes outstanding it is illegal to invest general fund monies. 

^VESTMENTS : 



iring the calendar year 1977, the program of investing idle funds from bond issues and general funds was 
sntinued with a resulting profit of $80,481.01 from investments and daily interest accounts. 

jnds received during 1977 from the Federal General Revenue Sharing and Revenue Sharing AntiRecession Fiscal 
ssistance programs were also invested with returns of $7,745.15 for General Revenue Sharing funds and 
5,637.10 for AntiRecession funds. 

EPARTMENTAL CHANGES: 



fter serving Wilmington well in various capacities over the past years, Mrs. Mary E. Denault retired as 
own Treasurer in April; Mrs. Rachel M. Burns was subsequently sworn in as Town Treasurer. 



11 



Town Clerk 



Vital Statistics - Chapter 46, General Laws as amended : 



Births - final figure for 1976 199 

Births - actually recorded for 1977 190 

Marriage Intentions recorded for 1977 151 

Marriages Recorded for 1977 177 

Deaths Recorded for 1977 97 



Chapter 46, Section 15 : 

The Town Clerk will furnish to parents, householders, physicians, and registered hospital medical officers 
applying therefor, blanks for the return of births as required by law. 

Chapter 114, Section 45 : 

Ten burial permits have been issued by the Town Clerk as Special Agent for the Board of Health in 1977. 
Seventeen out-of-state deaths were reported and filed in this office. Twenty-three Wilmington Veterans were 
buried in Wilmington Cemetery. 

TOWN RECORDS 

Permits and certificates of registration for the storage of inflammables : 

These licenses must be registered by the owner or occupant of the land, or by the holder of the license in 
the Town Clerk's office on or before April 30 of each year. Notification will be sent on or about March 15. 
If not registered, by law the license may be revoked by the licensing authority after a public hearing. 



Inflammables 


89 


Uniform Commercial Code recording 


240 


Uniform Commercial Code terminations 


31 


Federal Tax lien recordings 


14 


Dog Licenses issued 


1773 


Duplicate dog tags sold 


12 


Business Certificates recorded 


38 


Business withdrawals 


1 


Fish and Game licenses 


765 


Pole Locations 


16 


Medical registrations 


1 


Bazaars and Raffles 


7 



Other Services : 

Keep minutes of Annual and Special Town Meetings up-to-date. (Certify same upon request.) 

Town Clerk has complete charge of elections. Records election results. 

Send State election results to State Secretary forthwith. 

Keep Jury list up-to-date. Draw jurors when court orders come through. 

Certified an undetermined number of Births, Marriages, and Deaths. 

Certified an undetermined number of Births (Abstract forms) - used for school entrance, driver's license 
out-of-state travel and job applications. 

Proof of residence by letter or card - used for college entrances; undetermined number. 
Miscellaneous sales of books and maps - undetermined number. 

Receive writs against the Town and forward copies of same to the Town Counsel. 

Occasionally appear in court for the Town, when summoned - producing all papers and maps required. 

12 



ther Services (continued) 



Complete notes of the Town as received from the Town Treasurer - after approval by the Selectmen. Certify 
same. 

Record Board of Appeal decisions and certify them upon request. 
Keep a file of decisions by the Town Counsel. 
Record minutes and decisions of the Planning Board. 
Keep a file of Annual Reports. 

Keep a file of all Zoning and Town By-Law changes as approved by the Attorney General. 
Swear Town Officers to the faithful performance of their duties and keep a record of same. 
Accept business registrations and keep a file for public use. 

Prepare the Town Ballot for the voting machines and order the printing of same. 
Supervise payrolls for the Town meeting and election workers. 

Supervise the distribution and filing of nomination papers and the report of campaign and political 
finance expenditures. 

tie Town Clerk's office saw many changes in 1977. Mrs. Margaret Wagstaff changed jobs within the Town Hall 
Eter 12 years as Assistant Town Clerk, being replaced by Mrs. Pat Ward. Mrs. Esther Russell retired after 
D years as Town Clerk on December 31, 1977. As one of her last duties, she swore Mrs. Pat Ward into office 
3 Town Clerk, again leaving the position of Assistant Clerk open. This position will be filled the first 
E the year by Mrs. Kay Scanlon. 

Long with these changes, four Special elections were held during the summer; the first two to replace 

jnator McKenzie and the second to replace Representative Fred Cain. Also Mrs. Esther'Russell was drawn for 
jry Duty and served the month of November as a juror at Cambridge Court. 

1 virtue of her office, the Town Clerk is clerk to the Board of Registrars. In this capacity, I have - 
Met with the Board on regular meetings and special meetings. 
Kept the minutes of the Board up-to-date. 
Supervised the Annual Census by mail. 
Kept the voting list up-to-date. 

Registered voters during office hours and met with the Board for evening sessions and 
certification of nomination papers. 

Supervised the printing of the "Persons' Listed" Book. 



Constable 



iring the year the following notices and warrants were posted: 

Annual Town Election Primary Election State Senator 

Annual Town Meeting Primary Election State Representative 

Town Meeting, Second Session Special Election State Senator 

Special Town Meeting Special Election State Representative 

\ have also served and posted notices for the Town and other of its officers and departments. 



13 



Board of Registrars 



In accordance with Section 1, Chapter 3, of the Town By-Laws, meetings of the Board of Registrars were held 
on the second Monday of each month for the registration of voters and the conduct of business. Under Chaptc 
626 of the Acts of 1958, this meeting is open to the public and the press, and it is so posted in the Town I ] 

The Board has held registration periods as are required by the law for the Annual Town Election and Town Mee 
ing. There were other registration periods for the July and August Special Elections and the Special Town ^ ; 
ing held in October. 

The Town Clerk has attended Massachusetts Town Clerk conferences in order to keep up with the constantly chc ■ 
ing election laws. 

The Annual Census was taken jointly with the School Department for the first time and proved very successful 

In order to keep the voting list up-to-date, the Board annually compares the voting list with the annual ceriu 
If a voter's name does not appear on the census, it is subject to removal from the voting list. Drop lettei 
are sent to these people advising them to get in touch with the Town Clerk. 

New residents are requested to notify the Board of Registrars of the date which they take residence in the tin 
Any change of address within the town during the year should be brought to the attention of the Board of Re^ 
istration so that your name will not be removed from the voting list inadvertently. 

Again this year the Board of Registrars saw changes with Mrs. Esther Russell retiring after 20 years as Clei 
to the Board. 



1975 State Census (considered 'Official' 
1977 number of dogs listed in the census 



) 



17,656 
2,028 



Registered voters as of August 1977 



Democrats 
Republicans 
Undeclared 
American 



4,060 
966 
4,006 
10 



Total 



9,042 




Glen Road Sidewalk Construction 



14 



Town Collector 



)MMITTMENTS - 1977 

978 - Real Estate 11,592,112.40 

?78 - Apport. Water Betterment 9,076.11 

Dramitted Interest 5,512.42 

978 - Apport. Street Betterment 8,096.23 

jmmitted Interest 475.46 

978 - Water Lien 957.32 

978 - Apport. Sewer 7,228.27 

Dmmitted Interest 5,081.44 

978 - Sewer Lien 290.37 

978 - Personal Property 404,621.20 

978 - Farm 302.75 

977 - Excise 739,897.52 

976 - Excise 105,314.20 

975 - Excise 2,047.06 

Dport. Water Betterment - Paid in Full 1,664.80 

Dnnnitted Interest 14.31 

Dport. Street Betterment - Paid in Full 5,629.77 

ammitted Interest 39.17 

nbulance 9,695.00 

TOTAL COMMITMENTS $12,898,055.80 

3LLECTI0NS - 1977 1978 1977 OTHER YEARS 

2al Estate $5,253,014.23 $4,567,404.57 $ 78,409.77 

Dport. Water Betterment 6,910.82 658.71 55.15 

Dmmitted Interest 3,928.70 350.08 26.44 

Dport. Street Betterment 6,795.97 117.45 

Dmmitted Interest 3,539.78 48.02 

ater Liens 22,429.86 2,972.65 559.88 

pport. Sewer Betterment 3,431.88 

Dmmitted Interest 2,499.88 

swer Liens 290.37 

srsonal Property 202,939.60 166,403.27 1,579.20 

arm 155.62 

Dtor Vehicle Excise 507,053.59 154,720.30 

pport. Water Betterment - Paid in Full 1,664.80 

Dmmitted Interest 14.31 

pport. Street Betterment - Paid in Full 5,629.77 

ammitted Interest 39.17 

napport. Sewer Betterments 3,663.17 

nterest and Costs 29,680.53 

unicipal Lien Cert. & Betterment Cert. 3,102.00 

nbulance 4,862.25 

dvertising 74.25 

isclaimed Tax Titles 856.90 

ater Dept. Collections 589,156.30 



TOTAL COLLECTIONS $11,625,039.24 



15 



Town Counsel 



In accordance with the requirements of the Town By-Laws, I submit herewith my report as Town Counsel coverinji 
the year 1977. 

(a) On January 1, 1977, there were pending the following actions by or against the Town (exclusive of 
actions in which the Town was merely summoned as trustee, and in which it had no interest, and of tax lien 
foreclosure proceedings in the Land Court and petitions for abatement before the Appellate Tax Board*) . 

Beatrice G. Swenson v. Town of Wilmington etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of 
damages for land taking) . 

Harvey Lobdell v. Board of Appeals, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition in equity for appeal for variance 
by zoning by-laws) . 

Androniki Gaglione v. Thomas B. Brennan, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of 
damages) . 

Joseph Scaro etal v. County of Middlesex etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of 
damages for land taking) . 

John J. Elia v. Bruce MacDonald etals , Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for writ of certiorari concern 
ing revocation of a gasoline storage license) . 

John E. Hayvard etal v. County of Middlesex, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment | 
of damages for land taking) . ! 

John E. Hayward etal v. County of Middlesex etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment I 
of damages for land taking) . 

Hillcrest Realty, Inc. v. A» Daniel Gillis etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Appeal of decision of Plannini 
Board denying approval of definitive subdivision) . 

Morton Grant, etals v. Robert E. Jennings, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Appeal from decision of the 
Board of Appeals) . 

Robert Stevens, Tr. v. Town of Wilmington and Planning Board, Land Court (Petition for registration and * 
claim to Swain Court - Private Way) . 

Town of Wilmington v. Frank C. Powers etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for contempt for failure 
to comply with final decree). 

Town of Wilmington v. Boston and Maine Railroad, U.S. District Court - Bankruptcy (In-re Boston and Main 
Railroad Reorganization Proceedings - Claim for real estate taxes due) . 

I S! 

Robert W. Merserve etal Trustees for the property of Boston and Maine Railroad Corporation v. Town of 
Wilmington - Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of damages). 

Richard D. Zambernardi etal v. Town of Wilmington Board of Selectmen, Middlesex Superior Court (Suit 
in equity for declaratory judgment to determine the validity of betterment assessment). 

Town of Wilmington v. Joseph A. LaCreta, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition in equity to enforce the 
zoning by-law) . 

Harry S. Sukeforth etals, Trs. v. Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court 
(Petition for assessment of damages) . . 



16 



Else M. Lanois v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of damages for 
ind taking) . 

Robert Lewis v. Esther L. Russell etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for writ of mandamus to re- 
jire Town Clerk to issue kennel licenses) . 

Sanborn Brothers, Inc. v. Town of Wilmington, District Court of Lowell , (Action for property damage - 
2gligence) . 

Robert L. Stevens v. William G. Hooper, Jr., etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Appeal under C. 41, 8 IBB 
rom the failure of the Planning Board to properly endorse a plan) . 

Stepan Chemical Co. v. Town of Wilmington etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Bill of Complaint for Declar- 
:ory Relief as to the Validity of a Sewer Betterment Assessment) . 

Stepan Chemical Co. v. Town of Wilmington etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Bill of Complaint for Declar- 
;ory Relief as to the Validity of Assessment of Sewer Use Charges, for Recovery of Damages and for Injunctive 
;lief) . 

George Anderson etal v. Town of Wilmington etal. Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (Claim for 
^rsonal injury). 

School Teacher v. The Wilmington School Committee, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (Complaint 
: discrimination as to benefits). 

John J. Lyons, etal v. Town of Wilmington, Land Court (Complaint to determine validity and extent of 
le Zoning By-Laws of the Town of Wilmington. 

George W. Lloyd etal v. Jackson Brothers, Inc. and Town of Wilmington Middlesex Superior Court (Com- 
.aint for alleged damages resulting from diversion of water) . 

James Zaccagnini v. James Mar si, Middlesex Superior Court (Complaint alleging libel by police officer 
I the performance of his duties) . 

Edward W. Powers etal v. Town of Milton etal. Supreme Judicial Court (Declaratory Judgment to determine 
)nstitutionality of Civil Service Statute). 

John C. Cooke v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of damages) . 

John V. Kunigenas etals v. Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for 
isessment of damages) . 

Stepan Chemical Co. v. Town of Wilmington etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for abatement of 
:wer betterment assessment) . 

Stepan Chemical Co. v. Town of Wilmington etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for abatement of sewer 
!e charge) . 

Alice S. Brown v. Town of Wilmington, Land Court (Petition for assessment of damages for land taking) . 

Fred T. Corum etal v. Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for 
isessment of damages for land taking) . 

Donald C. Eaton, etal v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of damages 
ir land taking) . 

Rosaline T. Abi-Ezzi v. Wilmington School Committee etal, Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination 
Ilaim for payment of maternity benefits) . 

Carl E. Hussey v. Town of Wilmington etals, Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination (Claim against 
)wn for discrimination in awarding contract) . 

Marie Mack v. Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment 
: damages for land taking) . 



17 



Austin L. Rounds v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of damages fori 
land taking) . ; 

Joseph J. Salpietro etal v. Robert E. Shelley, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Claim for personal injuryi 
and property damage) . 

Alice Papaliolios v. A. Daniel Glllls, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Complaint for invasion of privac 
and defamation) . 

Town of Wilmington v. Richard Anderson, Middlesex Superior Court (Bill to vacate award of Board of Con- 
ciliation and Arbitration) . 

A. Daniel Gillis etal v. Antonio J. Tambone, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Appeal of the decision of 
the Board of Appeals granting a comprehensive permit - Chapter 774 of the Acts of 1969). 

Beverly A. Berrigan, etals v. James F. Banda, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Suit to enjoin alleged 
invalid expenditure) . 

Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational Technical School District Committee v. Town of Wilmington etals , 
Middlesex Superior Court (Suit to recover alleged deficiency appropriation plus penalty). 

Donald Robbins, Trustee v. A. Daniel Gillis etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of 
damages) . 

James Zaccagnini v. Sterling C. Morris, etals, U.S. District Court of Massachusetts (Suit alleging 
violation of plaintiff's civil rights). 

Kevin McKelvey v. Town of Wilmington, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Suit alleging breach of employ- 
ment contract) . I 

Town of Wilmington v. Rosnoe Construction Corp., etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Action to restrain the 
removal of soil, loam, sand or gravel from defendant's premises). [ 

*There are pending as of January 1, 1978, 44 separate petitions for abatements before the Appellate Tax 
Board, many involving claims for several different years. i 

(b) (1) During the year 1977, the following new actions were brought against the Town of Wilmington 
or its officers or agents. 

Gibbs Realty and Development Corporation v. Bruce MacDonald, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Appeal froj 
decision of Board of Appeals denying building permit) . 

Frank T. Mack, etal v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Claim for personal injury and 
property damage resulting from alleged street defect) . 

James Rooney v. Town of Wilmington, Civil Service Commission (Appeal from decision of appointing 
authority) . i 

Lawrence H. Gushing, Jr., etal v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Claim for land damages 
resulting from taking for town forest) . 

Papaliolios v. Esther L. Russell etal. Appeals Court (Appeal from decision of Middlesex Superior Court 
denying kennel licenses) . 

Doris Mattucci v. Anthony E. Krzeminski, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Certiorari v. Board of 
Assessors after partial denial of Clause 18 Exemption) . 

Frances Dec v. Town of Wilmington etal, Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination (Complaint 
alleging sex discrimination) . 

Robert E. Casey, etal v. Bruce MacDonald, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Appeal from decision of the 
Board of Appeals) . 



18 



(b) (2) During the year 1977, the following new actions were brought by or on behalf of the Tovm. 

[ Town of Wilmington v. Oxford Associates, Inc., Middlesex Superior Court (Claim to recover motor vehicle 
seise taxes) . 

(c) During the year 1977, the following actions by or against the Town were finally disposed of. 

John J. Elia v. Bruce MacDonald, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of by judgment of dismissal 
JT want of prosecution) . 

Papaliolios v. Esther L. Russell etal. Appeals Court (Disposed of by decision of Appeals Court affirming 
jperior Court decision for Esther L. Russell, etal). 

Robert Lewis v. Esther L. Russell etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of by judgment of Superior 
Durt affirmed) . 

Town of Wilmington v. Boston and Maine Railroad, U.S. District Court - Bankruptcy (Disposed of by re- 
jvery of two-thirds of amount due pursuant to proceedings for reorganization of a railroad) . 

Robert W. Meserve etal, Trustees for the property of Boston and Maine Railroad Corporation v. Town of 
Llmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of by stipulation for dismissal being part of real estate tax 
ittlement) . 

Fred T. Corum etal v. Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of by 
itisf action of execution of Middlesex Superior Court in the amount of $9750.00 in addition to pro tanto 
jm paid) . 

Morton Grant, etals v. Robert E. Jennings, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of by judgment 
mulling decision of Board of Appeals) . 

Alice S. Brown v. Town of Wilmington, Land Court (Disposed of by final decree of Land Court removing 
Loud on title) . 

A. Daniel Gillis etal v. Antonio J. Tambone etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of by judgment 
mulling decision of Board of Appeals). 

Carl E. Hussey v. Town of Wilmington etals, Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination (Disposed 
E by order of dismissal for lack of jurisdiction). 

Beverly A. Berrigan, etals v. James F. Banda, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of by judgment 
F dismissal) . 

Kevin McKelvey v. Town of Wilmington, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of by payment of 
373.00). 

Town of Wilmington v. Joseph A. LaCreta, Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of by stipulation of 
ismissal) . 

Robert L. Stevens v. William G. Hooper, Jr., etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of by judgment 
E dismissal) . 



19 



Planning Board 



This seemed to be the year of changes for the Wilmington Planning Board. They started off the year with one 
vacancy and shortly after regretfully accepted the resignation of another member, Joel Gardiner. The Board 
would like to express at this time their sincerest gratitude to him for his past services. Filling the two 
vacant seats are two enthusiastic new members, John DeRoy and Walter Kenney. In June the Board lost also th 
services and expertise of their Planning Director, Madelyn McKie, to whom the Board expresses their apprecia 
tion for all her assistance. The Board recently hired a new Planning Assistant, Martin Goldstein, who has a 
Masters Degree in City and Regional Planning from Harvard University. 

Then in July one of the nicest changes occurred, the Planning Board's office was relocated from the Mildred 
Rogers School to the second floor of the Whitefield School. Scheduled office hours are posted at the Town 
Hall and the Board continues to meet every Tuesday evening. The first and third Tuesday being for General 
Planning and the second and fourth Tuesday for Consideration of Subdivision Plan. 

General Planning 

More changes were made through the Planning Board's success in passing the following Warrant Articles at the 
1977 Annual Town Meeting: 

1. The Town's Zoning By-Law was brought into conformance with the States New Zoning Enabling Act, Chap 
ter 40A G.L. through the acceptance of the provisions of Chapter 808. Wilmington was one of the first towns 
to do this before the mandatory date of June 1978 and has been used as a model for other surrounding towns. 

2. An amendment to the By-Law of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington which allowed the Selectmen 
to appoint an Official Map Board of Appeals. 

3. The passage of an amendment to the Zoning By-Laws regarding non-commercial keeping of animals and 
the definition of what constitutes a "kennel" and the number of dogs permitted in SRA Zones. 

Other areas the Planning Board actively worked on were: 

1. Assisting the Wilmington Housing Authority in locating sites for the elderly. 

2. Prepared for the Recreation Commission an up-dated Open Space Map for a Recreation Athletic Complex 
Study which was approved at Town Meeting. 

3. A Grant Application for a Housing Rehabilitation Program which they worked in conjunction with the 
Assistant Town Manager, Peter Holzmeister. 

4. A review of the goals and objectives of the Town of Wilmington through the use of a Planning Consul- 
tant, Charles Eliot. 

Subdivisions and Plans 

This year the Board reviewed three subdivisions of property, Roncalli Park Preliminary Subdivision Plan on 
Ballardvale Street which was disapproved, Woburn Heights Preliminary Subdivision Plan off Woburn Street which 
was approved with conditions and Mill Road Definitive Subdivision Plan which was disapproved. As required by 
the Subdivision Rules and Regulations, the Planning Board received for engineering and related costs incurred 
by the Town in the development of a new subdivision a fee in the amount of $2,805.42. The Board was kept 
busy with the submission of fifty-five (55) applications and plans believed not to require approval under the 
Subdivision Control Law. Fifty-two (52) were approved, zero (0) were disapproved and three (3) were withdraw 
without prejudice. 

With the aid of the new Planning Assistant, the Planning Board hopes to undertake the following projects in 
the coming year : 



20 



1. To review parts of the Zoning By-Law to enable a greater mixture of housing types; 

2. To study Wilmington's water supply and how it can be protected by zoning; 

3. Continue work on Route 129 By-Pass; 

4. To study and review the economic growth in the center of town with the Center Planning Committee (CPC) . 

le Planning Board would like to thank all those who helped so greatly, especially Robert L. Higgins, Town 
.gineer, all Boards and Committees, Town Officials and hope for their continued help and support in the 
ming year. 



Public Buildings Department 



hletic fields again received a great deal of emphasis during 1977. With personnel and funds provided under 
le CETA Program, five baseball and softball fields were renovated. This program will continue in the spring 
1978 and it is planned to renovate all fields by late summer of 1978. 

le second stage of improvements in the High School were completed. Exhaust fans were installed in shops and 
me economics rooms. New cabinets, plumbing and electrical were installed in science rooms and a storage 
oset was renovated to be used as a kiln room by the Art Department. A smoke door and partition was also in- 
alled to provide a new teaching station for the gymnasium program. Ramps have also been provided to aid the 
ysically handicapped in entering the High School. 

ergy conservation continues to be of prime importance. Oil burners, heating controls and other elements of 
e heating systems are kept in good operating condition with regular service and service and adjustment, 
ndows and doors are being weatherstripped when needed. Buildings are being made as energy efficient as 
ssible. 

ting machines were programmed for local, two state primaries and two state elections. The High School gym- 
sium was set up for each election. 

jor roof repairs were made to the Woburn Street and West Intermediate School. The final stage of the West 
termediate School roof replacement program will be completed in 1978. Only minor roof leaks were encounter- 
during 1977. 

ne-hundred and ninety-four windows were broken during 1977. This is sixty-nine less then in 1976. A small 
duction, but, hopefully a trend downward. Other vandalism during 1977 included damaged electrical fixtures, 
^mbing fixtures, false fire alarms, salt spread on ice skating areas and writing on walls. 

formal Preventive Maintenance Program was started in 1976 on a trial basis. The program has been successful 
d will be continued. Two technicians inspect, lubricate, and service equipment on a regular basis in order 
prevent as much down time as possible. Emergency down time of pumps, motors and related equipment has been 
duced . 

thanks to the personnel in the Public Buildings and Grounds Department for an outstanding job in 1977 and 
appreciation to those departments that provided assistance during 1977. 



21 



Library Trustees 



Your Library Trustees, listed in the front of this Annual Tovm Report hereby again report to the citizens o 
Wilmington. 

We believe in what we are doing, that the people of Wilmington want it, need it and are using it to their 
great advantage. 

The circulation for 1977 was 117,352. With 52 Sundays, 19 holidays and the very stormy days, we were open 
294 days. That, believe it, means an average of 400 transactions per day. We have, since 1972, increased 
33,000 transactions per year or 114 per day in circulation. There are 15,032 registered patrons in our 
files. Is the library worth its costs? In these days of inflation the people are really using the library 
We intend to serve them, but "them" is you and we need your help. 



Librarian 



In accordance with the statutes of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the By-Laws of the Town of Wilmingi 
it is with pleasure I submit my report with its accompanying statistics for the calendar year 1977. This n 
port will feature the remarks received from the Memorial Library's departmental supervisors. 

Mrs. Louise Balser, who has been Cataloger and Head of Technical Services since 1966, reports "This past ye; 
Technical Services has continued to provide efficient and economical service to the other departments in thi 
library which ultimately results in providing books and materials for the library patron. The main objecti' 
has been to 'keep-on-top' of the daily routines required in ordering, receiving, cataloging and classifying 
and processing all materials. Technical Services continues to perform all of the behind-the-scenes details 
which is frequently unnoticed but totally necessary if the patrons are to be properly served." 

The Memorial Library's performance and activity is frequently measured by circulation statistics. Circula- 
tion reached its highest recorded point in 1975, dropped somewhat in 1976, and climbed again. The final fi 
ure for 1977 is expected to approach 117,000. 

During 1977, Comprehensive Employment Training Act personnel made it possible for the library to realign it 
staffing and reorganize dail^' procedures. Overdue and billing procedures have been centralized for the adu 
and children's departments. This centralization under the direction of Mrs. Barbara White has proven to be 
efficient in ensuring that overdue notices and bills are sent promptly, and that the maximum availability o 
materials is provided to patrons. The introduction of a service charge in July 1977 has been successful in 
stimulating the prompt return of overdue material, and in decreasing the number of bills and library suspen 
sions. Mrs. White and her student assistants are to be commended for handling these transactions with tact 
and courtesy. 



22 



s. Sarah Rueter, newly elected Chairman of the New England Round Table of Children's Librarians, and Head 
Children's Services for the past six years, concisely reports that the "Highly successful summer program 
lied the Cricket Club was accompanied by a 28% increase in book circulation. Heavily increased use of the 
cm and the specialized services of the department throughout the year was notable. The young teen fiction 
llection was moved upstairs opposite the circulation desk; a wall-length rack for paperbacks was installed; 
d, limited leisure seating was arranged for parents. A large variety of materials were added to make the 
llection more responsive to the children with special needs." Mrs. Rueter worked extensively with Mr. 
seph Connolly and Wilmington School specialists to develop a printed catalog for parents and teachers of 
ildren with special needs, identifying in the Memorial Library's Children's Room, items useful in working 
th children who have learning problems. 

s. Rueter concluded her report by mentioning the much admired eight-foot high mural painted by Children's 
om Assistant Susan MacDonald for the "Cricket Club". 

e report of the Adult Services and Reference Department, headed by Christina Molesevich, and supported by 
liot Drew, cites that "Patron use of the adult department in 1977 demonstrates that the library is recognized 
d depended upon as a center of information for self-education. The staff responded to 5,522 reference and 
ader service questions, an increase of 48% over 1976. In that many of these questions were from adults con- 
nuing formal education and vocational training, and from women returning to the workworld, one can see a 
cial trend in which the library plays a vital role. The adult department has been able to respond success- 
lly to the increased demand for reference service at all levels as well as to the general increase in all 
brary activity. Federally funded CETA support in 1977 made possible a service level that enabled the li- 
ary to meet patron expectations for efficient service. CETA personnel in the adult department served at 
e main circulation desk, performed important clerical duties, and completed a much needed inventory of all 
e library's collections. The completion of this inventory is a most valuable contribution in that it will 
rve as a basis for collection development. The professional staff can use the inventory information to re- 
ild areas of the collection which have been seriously weakened by theft. The inventory has provided a more 
curate record of the library's holdings which will facilitate access to the collection and thereby improve 
rvice. " 

n the Adult Department ways and means of improving the 'reserve book service' were studied. Reference and 
rculation staff studied ways of reducing patron's waiting time for best sellers and in-demand titles. Al- 
ough waiting time cannot be eliminated in every instance, various ways have been introduced to reduce the 
iting period as much as possible." 

he entire staff in the Adult Department is to be acknowledged for its flexability, its willingness to assume 
w responsibilities, and its ability to learn new and varied tasks in attempting to meet the library's pri- 
ry goal of providing quality service to the town." 

e Library Director wishes to highly commend the department heads and others who spent so much time prepar- 
g the detailed analysis for Fiscal Year 1978-79's "Zero-Based Budget". Their work was valuable, essential, 
hausting, and outstanding. . .The Director gratefully acknowleges the work of CETA under the direction of 
bert Caswell, in accomplishing the complete inventory of the library's collections ... The Director hopes 
at next year will see the installation of a theft detection system to avoid the further erosion of the li- 
ary's holdings... A complete re-registration of all the library patrons will be made possible during 1978 due 

CETA funding. .. 1978 may see the publication of a Memorial Library Newsletter on an experimental basis... 

the wind is a trial-run with experimental Sunday Library hours .. .Another request has been made to purchase 
reader-printer for the microfilm and microfische collections... 

rrent CETA funding and assistance will terminate for the library during May of 1978 .. .Adequate and proper 
iffing will be a major concern. .. Service levels and public expectations will be of utmost concern... 

; statistics which accompany this report show an increase in the volume of activity in all areas. These 
itistics are only part of the picture. The Library Director gratefully acknowleges the assistance of 
irling C. Morris and Peter L. Holzmeister, the Board of Library Trustees, the entire library staff, and 
■3se who have tangibly and intangibly expressed their support of their Memorial Library and those associated 
:h it. 



23 



LIBRARY STATISTICS 



for the calendar year January 1 - December 31, 1977 



Date of founding: 


1871 


Library Director: 


Philip W. 1 


Number or days open during 1977: 


294 


Hours open each week: 


69 


Number of volumes beginning of the year : 


59,163 


Number of volumes purchased during the year : 


7, 181 


Number of volumes added as gifts: 


138 


Number of volumes withdrawn during the year: 


** -3,232 


Number of volumes as of December 31, 1977: 


63,250 


A/V material 


1,945 


Microform 


1,771 


Newspapers 


14 


Periodicals 


292 


Art prints 


192 


Realia 


150 


Total holdings as of December 31, 1977: 


67,614 


Population: 1977 


17 ,800 


Circulation : 


117,352 


Adult: 03,947 Children: 40,108 111: 119 




Museum passes: 216 A/V: 5,445 Periodicals: 4,824 




Prints: 703 




Circulation per capita: 


6.59 


Retrospective circulation totals: 




1972 


84,652 


1973 


99,183 


1974 


102,186 


1975 


117,612 


1976 


113,343 


Circulation control statistics: 




Number of adult reserves processed: 


2,063 


Number of overdue notices sent: 


12,129 


Number of bills sent: 


2,460 


Number of overdue items involved : 


29,667 


Number of bill items involved: 


4,767 


Registered library patrons: 


15,032 



**The high number of volumes withdrawn reflects the results of a complete detailed inventory performed 



by CETA personnel. 

Total reference and reader service statistics for 1977: 5,522 
Retrospective reference and reader services for: 

1972 2,519 

1973 3,198 

1974 3,158 

1975 3,689 

1976 3,739 
Interlibrary Loans: Requests to other libraries 

Requests to other libraries 135 

Received from other libraries 92 

Number loaned to other libraries 45 

Appropriations and income for 1977: $188,372 

Per capita expenditures: $10.58 

Funds transferred to Town Treasurer: $1,607.31 
Payment for lost library material: $477.84 
Payment received for service charges: 380.00 



Miscellaneous funds received: 749.47 



24 



Conservation Commission 



le Conservation Commission has become increasingly active during 1977 in the concerns which are most central 
3 its existence, and which require the greatest amount of time from its volunteer members. There have been 
iny more on-site inspections than in previous years, to determine applicability of the Wetlands Protection 
;t, and to check on the status of various projects already under an Order of Conditions. In addition to the 
Leld work, there has been an increase in the number of Wetland Protection Act hearings, partially reflecting 
le fact that, as less buildable land is left in town, more building is attempted in wetland areas. One such 
icision was appealed to the State Department of Environmental Quality Engineering which, after subsequent 
tarings, reinforced the Commission's original Order of Conditions. In addition to the determination, hear- 
igs, and inspections, directly related to the application of the Wetland Protection Act, the Commission is 
ivolved in many other activities. 

le Conservation section of the Town's Open Space Plan was updated to allow Wilmington to continue to be eli- 
^ble for funds through the State's Self-Help program, which provides reimbursement of a large percentage of 
le purchase price of land acquired for conservation purposes. A sign denoting "Alderwood Acres," made by 
Roberts, is now in place at the end of Kenwood Avenue. This conservation land, located between Kenwood 
'enue and West Street, acquired with State Self-Help funds, provides an example of public use of public con- 
;rvation land, as a place for public skating. During 1977 a total of 30 acres of land was acquired, as a 
.ft from Jackson Brothers and as a purchase through Town Meeting from Albert Brun. 

series of four programs on "Your Environment" was sponsored jointly with the Wilmington Memorial Library, 
ivering the topics of "Wildlife," by Walter Kilroy, Vice President of the MSPCA: "Basic Solar Energy," by 
;ffery Brauer of the Solar Action Office; "Water Resource Conservation" by Ann Conway and "Home Energy 
inservation" by Tom Pelham, both from MAPC. The Commission donated 32 books to the library, both to the 
lildren's and adult sections, relevent to such issues as the energy crisis, solar and other forms of alter- 
te energy, ecology, wildlife conservation, the ocean and other water resources, and legal aspects of some 

these issues. Also, in the area of education, the Commission again sponsored three Wilmington boys at 
nservation camp. 

regional perspective on water resources is obviously necessary since water resources usually do not neatly 
t into the political boundaries of town, and because upstream activities may well influence downstream 
ter quality and supply. This applies to underground water sources as well as to the more obvious streams 
d rivers. Wilmington, at the headwaters of the Ipswich River, is fortunate in not yet having felt the 
nch of limited or polluted water supply to the degree that even some of our neighboring towns have. How- 
er, Wilmington, through the Conservation Commission, is becoming more aware and active in the regional 
cture, including such activities as maintaining contact by attending meeting of the Ipswich Watershed, pro- 
ding input for the MAPC produced Ipswich River Basin Report, and involvement with the concerns of adjacent 
wns such as Reading, Billerica and North Reading, where various activities in one town may have a definite 
fluence on the water quality, supply, etc. of the other town. 

addition to working on the regional level, the Commission seeks to understand and coordinate its efforts 
ith other boards and officials within Wilmington and attends meetings of other boards and groups where 
1 tters of joint concern are at issue. 

'e Commission lost a valued member when Alice Papaliolios resigned in the Spring, due to her husband's sab- 
I tical leave. The Papaliolios' are now residing in Tuscon, Arizona and we look forward to their return. 
Ill Ingram also resigned due to increasing demands of his work position. New members to the Commission this 
lar are Thomas McGinley, Jacqueline Allaman and Paul Rose. 



Conservation Project at Alderwood Estates 




25 



Police Department 



ARRESTS : 

Assault & Battery 35 

Arson 4 

Auto Theft 19 

Breaking & Entering 28 

Disorderly Conduct 14 

Fraud 36 

Larceny 93 

Narcotics 14 

Non-Support 18 

Receiving Stolen Property 7 

Robbery-Armed 2 

Sex Offenses 6 

Vandalism 14 

Violation of Liquor Laws 15 

All Other Offenses 104 

409 

MOTOR VEHICLE ARRESTS : 

Driver's License Violations 43 

Endangering 23 

Leaving Scene after Property Damage 8 

Operating Under the Influence 75 

Unregistered and Uninsured 40 

Speed 165 

Using Without Authority 7 

All Others 320 

681 

DETAINED FOR PROTECTIVE CUSTORY: NOT ARRESTED : 

Age 17 and Under 69 

Age 18 44 

Age 19 31 

Age 20 20 

Age 21 17 

Age 22 13 

Age 23 10 

Age 24 4 

Age 25 and over 86 

294 

OFFENSES REPORTED : 

Assaults: Gun 5 

Knife 5 

Other Weapon 9 

Hands, Feet, etc. 2 

Other Simple Assaults 42 

63 

BREAKING AND ENTERING : 

Forced Entry 258 

Entry, No Force Used 20 

Attempted Entry 96 

374 



ROBBERIES : 

Firearm 2 

Strongarm 2 

LARCENY : 

Pocketpicking 1 

Purse Snatching 2 

Shoplifting 2 

From Motor Vehicles 139 

Auto Parts & Accessories 67 

From Buildings 53 

From Coin Machines 1 

All Others 332 

597 

BICYCLES : 

Stolen 130 

Recovered 15 

MOTOR VEHICLES : 

Stolen from Wilmington-Recovered by Town 39 

Stolen in Town-Recovered Elsewhere 40 

Stolen Elsewhere-Recovered by Town 49 

128 

SEX OFFENSES : 

Attempted Rapes 3 

Indecent Exposures 17 

Indecent Assaults 5 

All Others 15 

40 

MISCELLANEOUS : 

Arson 7 

Bomb Threats 17 

Burglar Alarms Responded to 927 

Disturbances 967 

Domestic Problems 169 

Emergencies 222 

Fires Responded to 197 

Juvenile Problems 1914 

Lost and Found 93 

Malicious Damage 732 

Missing Persons 48 

Missing Persons Reported Returned 48 

Phone Calls, Suspicious, Obscene, etc. 49 

Prowlers 69 

Sudden Deaths 10 

Suicides, Attempts 6 

Threats to Persons 46 

Cruisers Dispatched 6764 

Motor Vehicle Accidents Reported 804 

Fatal Motor Vehicle Accidents 3 



11685 



26 



piER DEPARTMENT FUNCTIONS : 

iLrearm Identification Cards Issued 138 
Lcense to Carry Firearms Issued 205 
Brmits to Sell Ammunition 5 
jnsmith Permits 3 
Iquor I.D. Cards Issued 57 

A13 

Bports to Insurance Companies & Attorneys 
3r Verification of Residents with Claims of 
F Loss 37A 

srification of Loss by Phone & Mail 283 



Licenses Suspended by Registry of 15 
Motor Vehicles 

Licenses Revoked by Registry of 30 
Motor Vehicles 

Licenses Reinstated 26 

Empty Houses Checked While Resi- 136 
dents Away 

Summonses Delivered 374 



nee again, like in all other reports, I must remind each of you that the first part of this report are the 
umber of times we did this or did that throughout the year. 

us, we of the Department, they represent much more than statistics, they represent a "lot of work - the 
ombined efforts of thirty-four Regulars, about twenty Specials, and twenty-two Traffic Supervisors, and three 
lerks . 



he Department makes note of some of the changes during the year 1977 : 

he retirement of Sergeant Patrick Leonard on February 24 
he appointment to Sergeant of Bernard Nally on August 1 
he appointment of Patrolman Larry Redding on October 10 
he appointment of Patrolman Robert Vassalla on March 14 

atrolman Erlmest Burns left this department on May 10 for the Fire Department 
raffic Supervisor Pat Gately resigned as of August 12 
raffic Supervisor Peggy Duffy resigned as of August 15. 

ome of the accomplishments of Members of the Department are hereby noted : 

ergeant Jay Palmer received his second Associate Degree in May 1977 in Security Administration. He is the 
irst Police Officer of the Town of Wilmington to have earned two degrees. Law Enforcement and Security Admin- 
stration. Sergeant Palmer is also the first Police Officer of Wilmington to attend the F.B.I. National Aca- 
emy at Quantico, Virginia. He was selected by Chief Paul J. Lynch to attend the National F.B.I. Academy from 
pril 3 through June 15, 1977. Jay graduated from the Academy on June 16, 1977 with honors in the academic 
ield and also was awarded the Sharpshooter's Badge in the F.B.I. Firearms Course. This is quite an accomplish- 
ent . I know how grateful Jay is to all those who made it all possible. His sincere thanks are hereby ex- 
ressed publicly for this distinctive honor. The thanks of Jay's Chief are also sincerely expressed. Also 
he "Chief's congratulations for a job well done." 

hose who are still "Giving it the Old College Try" are: Sergeants Donald Mercier, Jay Palmer, Bobby Stewart, 
ernie Nally and Patrolmen Joe Cuoco, John Ritchie, John Harvey, Arthur Lynch, David McCue, Jim Rooney, Robert 
pencer. Bill Gable and Bob LaRivee. Each of these men are to be congratulated for their determination to 
urther their education in the interest of their work. 

he Department clerical staff, Edith Narduzzo, Margaret Perry and Maryann Langone attended a four week program 
onducted by the Mystic Valley Mental Health Center concerning the problems surrounding rape victims. These 
ame three girls have attended classes and studies at Rape Programs conducted by Choate Memorial Hospital, 
t is urgently requested that any victim of a rape or attempted rape repor t this immediately to the Police De- 
artment. Be assured that you may request that one of these three persons handle your case to your satisfac- 
ion. 

n concluding this, my Thirtieth Annual Report, may I once again take this opportunity to express my sincere 
hanks and appreciation to all those people who have in any way been of help or assistance to the Wilmington 
olice Department in the year 1977. 

pecial thanks and appreciation are hereby extended to the Town Manager, Assistant Town Manager, Board of 
electmen, members of the Wilmington Police Department, Department Clerks, Traffic Supervisors, Wilmington 
olice Associates and all Department Heads and their wonderful workers for their every efforts and spirit of 
ooperation during the year 1977. A Great Big "Thank Youl" 



27 



Fire Department 



The manual force consists of the Chief, Deputy Chief, four Lieutenants and twenty-eight Privates. There is 
a call force of ten members. The department responsed to a total of one thousand seven hundred and twenty- 
six calls . (1,726) . 



Residential Buildings 54 

Commercial Buildings 7 

Vehicles 97 

Brush, grass and rubbish 518 



Out of Town Assistance 27 

False Alarms or Needless Calls 117 

Rescue and Ambulance 682 

Service Calls 224 



Estimated value of property endangered was 
Estimated property loss was 
Permits issued for storage of oil 
Permits issued for blasting 

Permits issued for home fire alarms and inspections 



$23,898,245.00 
$ 156,200.00 
74 
17 
52 



As required by law, inspections were made of all schools, public buildings and all inflammable storage. 

The Fire Prevention Bureau, under the direction of Deputy Chief Wandell, made all necessary inspections of 
all business establishments in Town. Local industries were assisted in the organization and training of fii 
brigades. Fire Prevention lectures were given to the Schools. 

The Fire Alarm Division, under the direction of Private Blaisdell, made all necessary repairs to the fire 
alarm system and made eighty-six (86) changeover s for the light and telephone companies. Checked and servi< 1 
all fire alarm boxes. Put two new alarm boxes in service (Box 3292 Jeffery Chemical, 789 Woburn Street and 
Box 3318 Compugraphic , 25 Industrial Way). Replaced one (1) fire alarm box (324) at Lowell and Bay Streets 
Put up two (2) miles of new R.C. wire on Church Street, Wildwood Street, Lowell Street and Middlesex Avenue 

Private Walter Sowyrda conducted a twenty-hour refresher course for all Emergency Medical Technicians and 
also a First Responder and a C.P.R. course for all members of the Department. These courses are a require- 
ment of the State. At this time I would like to publicly congratulate Private Sowyrda for doing such a 
terrific job instructing the above courses. 

Deputy Chief Wandell, Lieutenant Blonigen, Privates Corcoran and Meuse attended fire-related courses at 
Community Colleges. 




Town Engineer 



/aluation of Work Load 

1 examination of the work load for the Engineering Department reveals that we spent our time this year as 
5II0WS : 25% Highway Department, Construction Projects; 25% Water and Sewer Board, Construction Projects; 
D% Planning Board, Subdivisions; 10% Town Wide and Future Projects; 10% Town Manager and Selectmen; 10% All 
:hers. We continue to revise our scheduling to provide service on a more balanced and equitable basis. 

i-House Procedures 



le yearly updating of Assessors' maps has over the last year been done on a more frequent basis and this has 
roved to be a valuable tool for the town's citizens and other town departments, boards and commissions. 

italoguing of the department's material, which was started sometime ago and then suspended, was resumed with 
le help of CETA personnel. 

rejects for the Year 



rreets that were prepared for Town Meeting action this year were the layouts of Fletcher Lane, Morgan Road, 
id Presidential Drive. Subdivision streets inspected during the year to assure compliance with Town stand- 
rds for future street acceptance were in Lucaya Estates, Cormier Park, Jewel Industrial Park, and Woburn 
;ights . 

1 addition to the routine projects which the department performs, we try to complete one project of lasting 
'.gnificance each year. This year, the department prepared, printed, and distributed a new "Zoning District 
ip" which is sold separately and with the Zoning By-Law in several Town Departments. 

)nclusion 



18 department continues to adjust time and resource priorities to better serve Town-wide interests. 



Redevelopment Authority 



le Wilmington Redevelopment Authority was pleased to greet a new member, Wilson Belbin, who joined the Board 
1 March 1977. 

Lso, in 1977, the Wilmington Redevelopment Authority welcomed a new company to the Industrial Park on Fames 
rreet. Harwick Chemical of Cambridge purchased a 2.75 acre lot of land and started construction in the Fall, 
ley expect to be operative in the Spring of 1978. 

.B.F. Scientific, one of the first industries to locate in the park, purchased an additional 2 acres of land 
)utting their property to accommodate their planned future expansion. 

le Wilmington Redevelopment Authority's goal for the coming year is to see the completion of Jewell Drive, 
lis they feel will attract prospective buyers for the remaining lots in the development. 

le only pending court proceeding for damages for land taking was disposed of during 1977. 



29 



Highway Department 



All the regular highway maintenance work was carried out during the year, such as patching streets, cleaning 
catch basins, sweeping streets, erection of street signs, picking up trash along our roadsides, painting anc 
replacing guardrails, scraping back roads, replacing broken curbing, etc. 

Sidewalk Program : 

We started the construction of a sidewalk on Forest Street from Burlington Avenue to Aldrich Road, approxi- 
mately AlOO feet. The construction is about 65% completed. It will be completed in the spring. 

Drainage : 

The drainage problems on the following streets have been eliminated: Brand Avenue, Broad Street, Lawrence 
Street, Dunton Road, Glen Road, Woodland Drive, Shawsheen Avenue, Blanchard Road, Marjorie Road, and High 
Street. 

Drainage systems on the following streets have been started and will be completed in the Spring: Chestnut 
Street and Faulkner Avenue. 

Chapter 90 Construction : 

Lowell Street was upgraded with 3 inches of bituminous concrete, from Route 38 to West Street, with the ex- 
ception of the intersection of Lowell and Woburn Street. The intersection will be finished in the summer 
after we obtain a new layout. 

Chapter 90 Maintenance and Hot Top Program : 

Church Street, from Wilmington Square to Middlesex Avenue, and Middlesex Avenue from Church Street to the 
railroad tracks in North Wilmington were upgraded with about 2 1/2 inches of bituminous concrete. 

Snow and Ice Removal : 

Snow and ice removal is a very expensive and major problem. The cost for snow and ice removal this year was 
$198,018.38. 

Roadside Pickup : 

This program is sponsored by the Chamber of Commerce. I would like to take this opportunity to thank the 
Chamber of Commerce and all the volunteers who participated in this program, picking up roadside litter and 
bagging it. The Highway Department assisted by hauling the litter away. 

Brooks and Streams Maintenance : 

As in the past years we used N.Y.C. and C.E.T.A. personnel .(Federally sponsored program), for our brooks and 
streams maintenance. 

Road Safety Program : 

This is another program funded by the Federal Government with C.E.T.A. personnel. Under this program, we fi 
ed and painted all our guardrails, cut brush along our roadsides and cleaned up the shoulders of our streets 

Equipment : 

The mechanics, foreman and I have checked over the equipment and sincerely conclude that we must replace 3 
dump trucks, 2 pickup trucks, 1 sweeper and 1 sander body for snow and ice removal. 



30 



concluding my report, I would like to take this opportunity to thank the Police Department for keeping us 
formed during the winter months of the road conditions between the hours of 4:00 p.m. and 7:30 a.m. week- 
ys, Sundays and holidays; the Water and Cemetery Departments for their help during snow storms; the vari- 
s departments for the cooperation extended this department during 1977; and the Town Manager and the Board 

Selectmen for their support throughout the year. Last but not least, to the men of the Highway Department 
o made 1977 a very productive year, my sincere thanks and appreciation. 



Tree Department 



tiereby submit my annual report for the Tree Department for the year 1977. 

i Tee Department carried on its routine work of trimming, cutting and removing trees. We also cut 33 
imps. In April the annual tree planting program took place. At this time 266 trees were set out, and most- 
cared for by the people who requested them by submitting their request at the Town Hall. Fifty-one di- 
ised and dead roadside trees were removed. Cut trees for the Highway Department Forest Street sidewalk 
istruction project. The insect control began in April. Odd jobs were done when requested for the School 
Lntenance Department. At Christmastime, we put up lights and decorations at the request of the Beautifica- 
)n Committee. A number of trees were fed and cared for to insure proper growth. Removed approximately 100 
rnets' nests on requests of residents. The Tree Department pick-up truck was used by the Highway Depart- 
\t to plow snow. 

a Leaf Beetle and Dutch Elm Disease: 



aples of elm trees believed to be diseased were sent to the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Mass. 
leteen diseased trees had to be taken down. 

:h Department : 

i control of such insects as oak skeletonizers , Japanese beetle, pine saw flies, ticks and clinch bugs, 

was maintained through continuous spraying; also the spraying of poison ivy. Trees were sprayed for 
!tern tent caterpillars and fall web worms. 

squito Control Program : 

i fog generator, owned by the Tree Department, is used for mosquito control. Between the hours of eight 
I twelve o'clock in the evening, fogging is carred on. We ask that the parents caution their children 
)ut the dangers involved in follow?.ng the fogger. Larvaecide was put in all trapped water holes to surpress 
h mosquito larva. 

rould like to thank the Town Manager and the Board of Selectmen for their support, the Town departments for 
lir cooperation, and the men of the Tree Department for their efforts during the year 1977. 



31 



Inspector of Buildings 



Dwelling (single family) 
Residential Garages 
Additions & Alterations 



Industrial Buildings 

Commercial Buildings 

Add. & Alterations (non-res.) 

Swimming Pools 

Signs 

Utility Buildings 
Office Buildings 
Recreational Buildings 
Sheds & Barns 
Medical Building 
Temporary Building 



No. 

72 
9 

129 



5 
2 
16 
42 
15 

1 

7 





Valuation 

$ 1,957,000 
40,350 
288,390 
$ 2,285,740 

$ 1,230,000 
5,400 
2,108,400 
97,750 
17,575 

70,000 

14,260 



$ 3,543,385 
$ 5,829.125 



No. 

68 
8 

132 



4 
4 
21 
47 
17 


1 
7 





Valuation 

$ 1,951,000 
37,000 
490,625 
$ 2,478,625 

$ 1,010,000 
64,600 
482,300 
130,850 
7,927 



145,000 
4,950 



$ 1,845,627 
$ 4,324,252 



No. 

51 
10 
110 



6 
4 
17 
43 
11 


1 
9 
1 
1 



Valuatioi 

$ 1,435,001 
36,601 
418,751 
$ 1,890,351 

$ 5,528,001 
219,001 
549, 00( 
158, 05( 
11,48: 



1,701 
21,01' 
2,009,00( 
1,20( 
$ 8,498,45' 

$10.388.8(> 



Renewals 

Demolitions 

Fire Damage & Repair 

Foundation 



14 
23 
5 
34 
374 



84,400 
47,000 
71,500 
202,900 



REPORT OF FEES RECEIVED AND TURNED OVER TO TREASURER: 



Building Permits 
Wiring Permits 
Gas Permits 
Plumbing Permits 



374 
362 
121 
150 
1008 



$ 13,164.00 
4,047.75 
1,043.00 
1,246.50 

$ 19.501.25 



5 
13 
2 
30 
359 



359 
376 
100 
118 
953 



$ 95,950 
20,000 
53,500 

$ 169,450 



$ 11,206.00 
3,849.75 
876.00 
701.50 

$ 16,633.25 



5 
7 
1 

9 

286 



286 
343 
125 
85 
839 



36,40( 
14,00(' 
19,50( 
69,90( 



$ 29,036.51 
4,131.7 
894. 0( 
894. 0( 

$ 35.199.7.' 



32 



Cemetery Department 



I addition to work on the expansion program, routine maintenance was done throughout the year. The regular 
iployees were assisted by five boys from the SPEDY 1977 program and men from the Comprehensive Emplojonent 
aining Act. 

le department has been constantly clearing .brush, wood and stumps and grading for expansion. One thousand, 
te hundred and eighty-two tons of fill was hauled from Cronin's pit and used for landscaping. An area des- 
nated as Section K was partially developed for two-grave lots. Nine hundred and ninety yards of loam was 
rchased from Deloury Construction Company. 

number of winter graves and sunken graves were loamed and seeded. Areas where the grass was sparse were 
rtilized and reseeded. Trees and shrubs were bought and planted in Section J and C. 

bbish barrels were painted and placed at the Town Park, Town beaches. Little League Park and the Common, 
ring the summer months the barrels were emptied three times a week; twice a week in the spring and fall 
d weekly the rest of the year. 

o days were spent at the Town Park repairing the bleachers. Vandals removed all of the nuts and bolts 
d scattered the irons around the field. The parking areas were constantly cleaned of broken glass. 

number of fall webworm nests were sprayed and removed from the foliage. The garden area at Harnden Tavern 
s graded and seeded. 

sign was erected for the Conservation Committee at the site of conservation land located at the end of 
nwood Avenue. 

e department assisted highway employees with snow removal. 

je department extends many thanks to Town Officials and Town Employees who assisted throughout the year. 

rials : Receipts : 

Residents died in Wilmington 8 Interments $ 8,702 

Residents died elsewhere 60 Liners 80 

Non-residents 45 Foundations 1,047 

Cremations 2 Setting markers 265 

Babies 1 Affidavits 18 



116 $10,112 
Trust Fund: 



Sale of lots $8,542 Perpetual Care $ 7,700 



33 



Housing Authority 



ORGANIZATION 

The Wilmington Housing Authority is authorized by Section 3 of Chapter 121B of the General Laws, as amended 
MEMBERS 

Mr. George W. Hooper, Chairman 

Mrs. Lorraine C. Brozyna, Vice Chairperson 

Miss Lulu E. Sanborn, Treasurer 

Mrs. Barbara H. Larson, Assistant Treasurer 

Mr. Kevin J. McMillan, Secretary 

Mr. Henry E. Borrazzo, Executive Director 

STATUTORY REFERENCE 

1. Housing Authority Law: Section 261 of the General Laws, as amended. 

2. Act of providing Housing for Elderly Persons of Low Income: Chapter 667 of the Acts of 195A, as amende 

BALANCE SHEET AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1977 - 667-1 
ASSETS LIABILITIES 



Administration Fund 
Accounts Receivable 
Investments 
Prepaid Insurance 

Modernization Award Development Cost 
Development Cost 
Less: Dev. Cost Liquidation 
Total Assets 



$ 10,086.33 
217.41 
14,119.92 
603.82 
53,127.44 
575,000.00 
- 135,000.00 
$ 518,154.92 



Accounts Payable 
Employee's Payroll Deductions 
Deferred Credits-Prepaid Rents 
Grants Authorized 
Notes Issued 
Less: Notes Retired 
Modernization Grant 
Debt Service Reserve 
Operating Reserve 
Residual Receipts (Deficits) 
Total Liabilities and Reserves 



? 3,311. 
162.. 
66.1 
440,000.1 
135,000.1 
-135,000.1 
53,033.: 
21,575.1 
11,896.; 
(11,889. 



BALANCE SHEET AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1977 - 705-1 



ASSETS 



Administrative Fund 
Accounts Receivable 
Prepaid Insurance 
Development Costs 
Total Assets 



667-1 



8,314.19 
0.00 
316.98 
162,005.80 
170,636.97 



LIABILITIES 

Accounts Payable - 667-1 
Accounts Payable - Vendors 
Grants Authorized 
Prior Year Deficit 
Residual Receipts (Deficits) 
Total Liabilities 



$518,154.' 



217.^ 
425.; 
180, 000. ( 
(6,290.{ 
(3,714.<' 



BALANCE SHEET AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1977 - Section 8 



ASSETS 



Cash - General Fund 
Total Assets 



4,251.31 
4,251.31 



LIABILITIES 

Accounts Payable-With. Taxes 
Accounts Payable-HUD 
Prepaid Annual Contributions 
Unreserved Surplus 
Operating Reserve 
Project Account 
Cumulative HUD Contributions 
Interest Income 
Expenses Paid 

Total Liabilities 



$ 170,636. 



123.: 
2,540.! 
5,421.C 
(39, 776. C 
41.7 
20,882.5 
18,893.4 
44.6 
(3,920.2 
4,251.3 



34 



BALANCE SHEET AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1977 - MODERNIZATION 

ASSETS LIABILITIES 

ash $ 18,793.84 Contract Retentions $ 1,615.00 

odernization Costs 38,154. 74 Modernization Grants 55,333.58 

Total Assets $ 56,948.58 Total Liabilities $ 56,948.58 



aring 1977, under the Chairmanship of George W. Hooper, the Wilmington Housing Authority was successful in 
:;quiring a committment from the Department of Housing and Urban Development for an additional 25 units of 
Dusing. During the course of this construction, a portion of employment and purchasing of material will be 
applied by local companies and local people to aid the local economy. 

977 also saw the completion of the long awaited and long needed underground heating and water filtration 
ystem. 

fter one year of operation of the Section 8 Housing Program, the program has been operating effectively and 
Ef iciently . 

Dplications have been prepared and submitted to the Department of Community Affairs to obtain additional 
jnding for continued Modernization Programs at the Deming Way development. These funds will be earmarked 
3r replacement of bathroom floors, roofs, and windows. 

lis past year, the Tenant Organization became active under the Presidency of George Murray, and has been 
Efective in developing tenant advisory programs as well as social programs. 

^quests have been made to the Shawsheen Valley Technical High School to build a gazebo for the tenants' 
jmmer use and a garage for storage. 

le Wilmington Housing Authority is totally funded by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and is not depend- 
it upon the Real Taxes of the Town of Wilmington. 



Sealer of Weights & Measures 



le following is a list of all weighing and measuring devices, scales, pumps, meters, and weights that were 
;sted, sealed, not sealed, and condemmed during the year 1977. 





Sealed 


Not Sealed 


Adjusted 


Condemmed 


Balances, Scales, Weights 


182 


18 


76 


20 


Liquid Measuring Meters 


191 


10 


63 


32 


Capacity Measures 


28 


11 


22 


24 


Other Measuring Devices 


42 


19 


32 


23 


Prepackaged Foods Reweighed 


4,700 









35 



Recreation Department 



Broadly defined, leisure is unobligated time - freedom from work. Recreation is what one does during his 
leisure, solely for the enjoyment or satisfaction obtained therein. 

Leisure has had an increasingly important effect upon the American way of life. Our society has changed froi 
one that was basically work-oriented to one that is increasingly leisure - centered. 

The Recreation Industry has become a 50 billion dollar a year enterprise, in this country alone. The demand 
for public Recreation Services is increasing at a steady rate as people seek relief from boredom and stress 
from modern day living. 

The following departmental objectives guide us in our efforts: 
OBJECTIVES 

To provide opportunities for self expression. 
To develop a sense of personal worth. 

To provide activities that allow for personal achievement and accomplishment. 
To provide activities that are fun and enjoyable. 

To provide physical activities which are new and different, offering a certain amount of challenge to 
participants . 

To teach skills in various activities that will have carry-over value in later life. 

To provide a healthful and diversified program of recreation activities in an attempt to meet the needs of 
the people being served. 

The Recreation Department in its seventh year with a full-time director presents the following information or 
1977 programs and activities: 

YOUTH PROGRAMS 

Summer Playgrounds : The summer playground program registered about 2,000 local youth between the ages 
of 6 and 12. The seven school locations, where the playgrounds were located, operated on a Monday through 
Friday basis from 9:00 to 3:00 p.m. over a seven week period. The playgrounds were staffed by three leaders 
and a Neighborhood Youth Corps aide at each location. Each playgr'ound was responsible for planning and im- 
plementing a wide variety of recreational activities for their registrants. Included as part of each play- 
ground's program were: arts and crafts, drama, interplayground competition, tennis, field trips, special 
events, family night cookouts, sports and games, quiet games, tournaments and pool days. Arts and crafts 
as presented by the specialist in that medium was, as always, a popular activity. Special events included 
the Knights of Columbus Soap Box Derby and three-day Olympics, Croquet Open, Horseshow Tourney, Tennis Tour- 
ney, Police Association Beach and Swim Day, and the "Little Red Wagon" a touring drama show that twice 
thrilled crowds of over 400 on the Common. A tremendous amount of volunteer and financial support by citi- 
zens and civic groups make this program unique and well received by the entire town. 

Tiny Tots : This was a new summer program for pre-schoolers. The Buzzell School served as the location. 
The program consisted of two, three week sessions. Within each session there was a morning class and an 
afternoon class, both of which met each day for the three week period. Activities included many kinds of 
games, songs, skits, arts and crafts, special events such as Indian Week and field trips to the Stoneham Zoo, 
Boston Children's Museum and our local Fire and Police Stations. This program received a very high level of 
success. This can be attributed to much planning and a competent and dedicated staff. 



36 



Special Needs : For the third year In succession we were fortunate In that we were allowed to utilize 
amp 40 Acres for this program. The program was staffed by thirteen supervisors and leaders plus Neighborhood 
outh Corps personnel and many volunteers. Because we are so fortunate in having such assistance, the young- 
ters were supervised almost on a one on one basis. Transportation for the approximately 50 campers was sup- 
lied by the donation of two station wagons by Fred F. Cain, Inc. This program also, like the playgrounds ran 
or seven weeks on a Monday through Friday basis. Their operating times were 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Activi- 
ies at the Camp included: arts and crafts, drama, field trips, pool days, active and quiet games, family 
ookouts, overnight camping and physically corrective activities in the Woburn Street School Gym. Special 
vents included participation in the Playground Oljrmpics and Beach Day, Kiwanis Club Cookout , family night 
upper and awards at the K of C Hall plus the conducting of our third annual Super Stars Competition sponsored 
y the Tewksbury-Wilmington Elks and participated in by 8 surrounding towns. This program is 50% reimbursable 
rom the Commonwealth. 

Teen Center : This past summer marked the third year of this program for local teens. The Walker School 
as utilized as the Center with the downstairs being used as a lounge, and the two main floor classrooms be- 
ng used as game rooms. The Center ran for 6 weeks on a Monday to Friday basis. Intermediate School youth 
ad use of the facility on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday mornings from 9:00 to 12:00 noon plus Tues- 
ay evenings. Grades 9 through 12 were involved during the evening hours of 7:00 and 10:00 p.m. on Monday and 
ednesday evenings plus Thursday afternoon. Friday was special event day. Over 400 youths registered and re- 
eived membership cards. Included in this program, which was staffed by three adult supervisors, were: active 
tid quiet games, tournaments, dances, swimming at the Shawsheen Tech Pool and various field trips. 

Baseball : Our Northeast Baseball League team was comprised of local boys between the ages of 15 and 18. 
tie team played a 18 game schedule in an 8-team division within the league. The season ran from June through 
Illy with home games being played on the High School field. Coaches and managers for the team volunteer their 
arvices. The team had the best record of any previous Wilmington team in this league to date. 

Softball : Girls between the ages of 13 and 16 played Softball during June, July and August in our intra- 
Dwn league. Nearly 100 girls participated in this 4 team intra-town league. Games were played on Saturdays 
t the Town Park. The travelling team played in the 12 team Middlesex League. Girls, ages 17 and over, formed 
team that played an independent schedule. 

Seven teams of boys, ages 13 to 17, formed our intra-town one pitch league. Over 100 boys participated, 
leir games were played on Tuesday, Fridays and Saturdays at the Town Park. All of the many fine coaches 
^rved as volunteers. 

Town Beach : Many children and parents as well use the Silver Lake beaches. The public beach was super- 
Lsed by qualified lifeguards seven days a week from June through Labor Day. The Town is fortunate to have 
ich a valuable natural recreation asset within its borders. 

Swimming Lessons : The Tech Pool was used in the fall for youth lessons, free swim and adults only so 
lat all swimmers in Wilmington had a chance to use this fine facility. 

During the summer, free lessons were conducted at Silver Lake. Three sessions of two-weeks duration 
ire held for beginners between the ages of 6 and 10. An advanced lifesaving and water safety course was also 
rfered free of charge. These lessons were for residents, ages 16 and over. Adults had the opportunity to 
irticipate in a free swim, and learn to swim, program at the Tech Pool. All of our swimming programs have 
ien received as well as any other program. There is usually a waiting list for these lessons. 

Basketball : Our winter basketball league, in its 14th season registered approximately 500 people from 
;es 9 on up. There were 46 teams in the three youth divisions and men's divisions. The season ran from 
icember through March. Games were played on Wednesday and Thursday evenings plus most of the day on Satur- 
^y and Sunday. Nearly 100 volunteers served as coaches and officials for this winter league. 

I Girls' teams practiced on Tuesday evenings from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. in the Woburn Street School Gym. 
)men practiced in the same gym from 8:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Boys' teams practiced in the West Intermediate 
;hool Gym on Thursdays from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m., while the men practiced in that gym from 8:00 p.m. to 10:00 P.M. 

Tennis Lessons : In June, lessons were offered to all ages. The lessons were given on weekends at the 
irth Intermediate School. There were three age groupings and a total of six classes. The response was good, 
I was to be expected due to the popularity of this sport. 



37 



Gymnastics : The response to our spring program for girls ages 3 on up was overwhelming. Many people 
interested in this sport. Over 300 girls participated in this new program with separate sessions in the s 
summer and fall. 

Baton : This also was a new program that was offered in the spring. Over 40 girls participated in th 
10 week course. 

Girls Ice Hockey : Our hockey team for teen age girls played in the Merrimack Valley Girls' Hockey Le 
from September through April. Games were played on Sundays in Tyngsboro. 

Soccer : Our two spring soccer teams for boys competed in the Middlesex Youth Soccer League. The A t 
for boys, ages 15 and under, played on Sunday while the B team, comprised of boys ages 13 and under, playe 
on Saturdays. The season ran from April through mid-June with home games being played at the Shawsheen Sc 

Elementary Open Gyms : The Shawsheen and Woburn Street School Gyms were open to grades 1 through 6 on 
Saturday mornings from January through March. A variety of active sports and games were available for the 
children. These gyms are usually filled to capacity during the open gym hours. 

Intermediate Open Gym : Both the North and West Intermediate School Gyms were utilized by intermediat 
age students on Saturday afternoons from 1:00 to 4:00 p.m. Basketball, gym hockey and tumbling were avail 
to participants. This program also ran from January through March. 

Bowling : This is an extensive school year program which runs out of Pleasure Lanes in North Reading. 
The program ran every weekday after school from early October through mid-April. Included were grades 4 t 
ough 12. Each bowler and school participated once a week. Bowlers received bus transportation from the s 
to the lanes and back to the vicinity of each bowler's home, plus 2 strings of bowling, a bowling shirt, i 
struction, supervision and a chance to win one of many trophies. A free field trip to Canobie Lake Park w. 
conducted in May for the bowlers. 

Santa's Workshop : Nearly 400 good little boys and girls visited Santa and his elves at their busy Wo 
shop in the former Mildred Rogers School. The Workshop was open from December 18 through 20. Children we 
able to sit on Santa's knee and receive a color snapshot with Santa. They also received a candy cane, a h( 
lium filled balloon and a chance to win prizes from under Santa's tree all free of charge. Donations re- 
ceived in connection with the program were sent to Globe Santa. 

Others: The Recreation Department either sponsored or participated in the following programs for Will 
ton youth: vacation programs, ski trips, dances, Jr. Winter Carnival, Celtics trips, Easter Egg Hunt, fre^ 
public skating. Memorial Marathon, free throw competition. Horribles Parade and Student Government Day, an' 
teen ballroom dancing, and soccer trips. 

ADULT PROGRAMS 

Men's Open Gym: Men, ages 18 and over, were able to participate in an informal gym program on Thursd 
evenings from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. in the West Intermediate School Gym. This program is usually well attend 
and runs from November through March. ' 

Basketball : Men competed in a separate league within the Basketball League. Their games played in t 
High School Gym on Sundays and Wednesday evenings. The season began in December and lasted through March. 

Ladies Open Gym: Ladies, ages 18 and over, had the use of the Woburn Street Gym Tuesday evenings froit 
8:00 to 9:30 p.m. Informal basketball was the activity provided. The program ran from early December thp 
March. 

Co-Ed Volleyball : This popular co-ed adult program ran on Wednesday evenings from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. 
the North Intermediate School Gym. The program ran from November into March and was always well attended. 

Ladies Slimnastics : The class ran from January to April on Wednesday evenings in the Shawsheen Schoo 
Gym. The ladies exercised to music, jogged, participated in informal competitive games and were given ins 
tion in belly dancing, folk dancing and tennis by professional teachers. 

Softball: A very active and successful men's softball league was conducted over the summer at the Tc 
Park. This entire program is supervised and conducted by volunteers spending much valuable time to insure 
continued success of this program. 



38 



Ballroom Dancing : Our most popular adult program ran on Monday evenings in the North Intermediate School 
feteria. Beginners, intermediate and advanced classes were conducted in 10-week programs. There were fall, 
nter and spring sessions most of which were filled to capacity. Nearly 500 Wilmington couples have partici- 
ted in the program. 

Others : Additional adult programs involving the Recreation Department were: men's ice hockey, ladies 
ftball, ladies bowling, Memorial Marathon, swimming lessons, use of the Town Park and beaches plus various 
eld trips. ^ 

MMUNITY YOUTH 

Several youth organizations in town received partial financial support through the Recreation Department 
dget. These excellent programs are run by interested volunteers who devote their time in helping our younger 
ople receive enjoyment through recreation activity. These organizations are Youth Hockey, Figure Skating 
ub, Pop Warner, Senior Little League and Pony League. 

Providing a well-diversified program of leisure recreation offerings is a town-wide function. Much sup- 
rt is necessary for the fulfillment of our programs. The Recreation Commission and Director thank those 
blic and private citizens plus the many civic and fraternal organizations for their generous support in help- 
g to provide a well-rounded program of recreation activities for the Town. 




39 



Board of Health 



Joseph Paglia was re-elected Cha irman of the Board of Health for the period 1977—1978. Thomas Morris was 
appointed by the Town Manager to replace Marion Boylen as a Board Member. 

. . . A town-wide flu program was conducted with the Wilmington Womens ' Club at no cost to the Town. 

. . . The annual rabies clinic for dogs was held May 21, 1977, at the Highway Garage. Innoculation fees 
covered the expense of the clinic. 

. . . A Diabetic Screening Program was held that included school personnel. 

. . . A Hypertension Program was held during the year with separate clinics for school and town personnel. 

. . . The Board of Health's nursing program was reinstated at the request of the Council for Aging at the 
Drop-In-Center . 

. . . Tuberculosis testing was made available to High School Seniors and other school personnel. 

. . . The Dental Program was expanded to include servicing of the eight grades and to provide class room 
demonstrations on dental care. 

. . . The Board continued funding Share during 1977. 

. . . A tetanus, diphtheria booster clinic was held for the High School Senior Class. 

. . . The services of a Physio Therapist was retained on a limited basis during 1977, at a minimal cost to 
the Town. 

. . . The Board continued to fund Wilmington Family Counseling. 

. . . The Board worked closely with school authorities in establishing measles clinics in the schools from 
kindergarten through grade 12. The immunizations were in order to conform to State requirements. 

. . . The Board continued its effort to reduce air pollution by working with the state and local industries 
resulting in fewer odor complaints in 1977. 

. . . The Board participated in Good Government Day. Mr. James Durkee accompanied a group of students to 
view the resource recovery plant in Saugus and to visit the Lawrence Experiment Station. 

. . . The Board approved a fifteen dollar fee for all field testing done in conjunction with sewage dis- 
posal systems. 

. . . The Director was given an award at the Annual Health Officers Conference for his efforts in enacting 
legislation relative to Title 5 of the State Code. 

. . . The Board entered into an agreement with the Combined Nurses of North Reading, Reading, and Wakefield 
to provide bedside nursing to the Town at no cost to the Town. 

. • • The Board began enforcing the provisions of the new Title 5 relative to sewage disposal effective 
July 1, 1977. 

. . . Article II of the State Sanitary Code dealing with housing became effective August 1977. 
A. COMMUNICABLE DISEASE 

1. Monthly Immunization Clinic Attendance 119 

40 



2. Tetanus/Diphtheria Booster Clinic 




Number innoculated Senior Class 


108 


3. Measles Immunization 




Kindergarten thru grade 12 


1084 


4. Communicable Diseases Reported During 


1977 




56 






Home visits 


16 






Office visits 


76 


5. Flu Immunization Clinic 




Total immunizations given 


544 


6. Tuberculosis Report 




New cases reported 


1 






Hospitalized during year 


1 






Home visits 


39 






Office visits 


164 






T.B. tests to seniors 


108 






T.B. tests to school personnel 


144 






T.B. tests to children at Head 


Start 41 


No money was expended, again in 1977, 


for 


tuberculosis hospitalization. 




PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING 








1. Nursing Visits During the Year 






1431 






Fees collected 


$378.50 


2. Premature Births Reported 




Reported 


8 




Home visits 


9 


3. Newborn Infants 




Home visits 


21 


4. Hypertension Program 




Office visits 


78 




Attendance 


283 






School personnel 


180 






Town employees 


42 


5. Diabetic Screening Program 




Clinic attendance 


98 






School personnel 


172 






Town employees 


38 


6. Drop-In Center 




Number counseling sessions 


50 






Attendance 


1060 


/ • IT li y o 1, lie L ciu y 




Home visits 


184 






Payment for service 


$944 . 00 


DENTAL HEALTH 




Children serviced 


1663 


DOG CLINIC 




Dogs innoculated 


526 






Fees collected 


$1,052.00 


ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH 








1. Licenses and Permits 




Sewerage 


105 






Food 


70 






Milk (store) 


49 






Milk (vehicles) 


3 






Recreation camps 


2 






Piggeries 


1 






Funeral Directors 


2 






Refuse transportation 


9 






Installers 


44 






Stable 


27 






Total Fees Collected 


$1,474.50 



41 



ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH (continued) 
2. Food Establishments 



Inspections 
Permits issued 
Fees collected 

Water samples collected 

Samples collected 

Inspections 
Licenses issued 



68 
70 

$350.00 
6 
12 



3 . Bathing Facilities 

4 . Water Analysis 

5 . Recreation Camps 

6 . Subdivisions 

The Board processed four subdivisions during the year. 

7. International Certificates Certified 

8. Sewerage Inspections and Investigations 

The annual inspection of all the public buildings' septic systems to determine the need for 
pumping was made by the Board of Health. 



25 
559 

359 



9. Complaints 
10. Solid Waste 

Browning Ferris Company completed their first year of a three-year rubbish collection contract 
in June. The collection system was carried out with a minimum of problems. The acceptability 
factor for this new system was good. 



1 1 . Inspector of Animals 



12. Court 



Animals quarantined 47 

Animals released from quarantine 47 

Animals disposed of 320 

Premises inspected for domestic animals 44 



Two appearances were made at the District Court. The Board was able to resolve many public healt, 
problems thereby avoiding court disputes. 



SHARE 



During 1977, 89 Wilmington residents received counseling in either residential or outpatient treat 
ment . 



J 



The Morningstar Counseling Program has counseled 25 youths and their families outside school froi 
Wilmington for a total of 584 counseling weeks. 

The Emergency Shelter Program has housed one individual adolescent from Wilmington for 29 days of 
shelter care. 

The Central Intake Unit has evaluated eight individuals from Wilmington in 1977. 

Morningstar Counselors have counseled fifty-five adolescents inside Wilmington High School and at^ 
Intermediate Schools. These students have been usually referred by school department personnel 
because they have a problem with substance abuse or other adolescent adjustment issues. | 

Other SHARE services include Psychiatric and Psychological Consultation, which is provided by Dr. 
Margolis and Dr. Smith to the Wilmington Guidance Department and the Wilmington Alcohol Concerns 
Group . 

42 



WILMINGTON FAMILY COUNSELING SERVICE, INC. 

Number of scheduled appointments 1144 

Number of cancelled appointments 216 

Cost at $24.00 ea. appointment $28,422.00 

Client fee $ 9,712.05 

Assessment to Town $18,749.45 

The Board did not sign a contract with Wilmington Family Counseling for the 1978 Fiscal Year. 
$14,500 was appropriated for this period. 

MYSTIC VALLEY MENTAL HEALTH CENTER 

In November 1977, a Burlington/Wilmington branch of Mystic Valley Mental Health was established at 120 
Cambridge Street in Burlington. This branch is open Monday through Friday. In addition, the staff is 
available through a 24-hour emergency answering service. For appointments call 272-3740. The following 
services are available at the Burlington office: 

Out-patient services, consultation and education services, emergency services, day treatment 
services, community residence services, foster care services, early intervention services for 
children with special needs, and mental retardation services. 



Wilmington Clients' Services Child Adult Total 

Number of clients seen 29 77 106 

Number of actual treatment hours 410 1188 1598 

Number of clients seen by crisis intervention team 20 

Clients seen in day treatment program 7 

Clients seen by mental retardation team 8 




Lillian Woodside and Friends for Hospital 



43 



Historical Commission 



During the past year the Wilmington Historical Commission has been actively pursuing knowledge of our loca; 
history through the important research required in completing our historical assets survey reports. Many 
hours have been spent at the Registry of Deeds in Lowell and in interviewing local residents. This work w: 
continue through 1978. 

We have been fortunate to have at our disposal the talents of Mr. Brian Pfeiffer, survey consultant recommt< 
ed to us by the Massachusetts Historical Commission, who has been working with us under a grant from the St( 
and has successfully completed surveys for most of the 19th Century homes of interest in our Town. In add: 
he has completed preliminary work on two areas in Town which are potential Historic Districts. These are l 
"Buck's Corner" area at Wildwood and Woburn Streets, and the "Old Town Center" on Middlesex Avenue at Glen 
Road . 

The Commission is pleased to report the successful installation of a security system at Harnden Tavern dur:i 
the spring. Acquisitioning, which has been long delayed pending the installation of security measures, ma] 
now proceed with items being accepted for display subject to approval of the Commission. Cataloging proce; 
of several local museums have been studied and compared by Adele Passmore and Melinda Murphy, and what app< 
to be a satisfactory system has been initiated. 

Much study and groundwork has gone into the project of replacing the roof of Harnden Tavern. Regretfully, 
anticipated matching funds for this project were not forthcoming, and the work must proceed in the spring \ 
a limited budget. Through the generosity and interest of the Beautif ication Commission, a palate of brick 
been given to the Harnden Tavern for the construction of walkways on the grounds. In addition, funds have 
been made available for the erection of an old, farm-type stonewall to enhance the front yard and entrance 
the old house. This work, also, is expected to proceed in the early spring. 

During the summer months Commission Chairman, Adele Passmore, and Town Clerk, Esther Russell, were successli 
in having the crumbling remains of our most valuable Town record, the first book of Town Meeting proceedinj. 
dating from 1730 through mid-1807, restored. It has been completely cleaned and handsomely rebound in a hci 
tooled, reversed-calf binding by the New England Document Center in North Andover. 

This year has seen great progress in the establishment and growth of "The Friends of Harnden Tavern", a gr( 
initiated and sponsored last year by the Historical Commission. The "Friends" have now been incorporated ; 
a social and fund-raising group in order to further the development and use of the Col. Joshua Harnden Tav( 
our Town-owned museum facility. 

The excellent response to several very successful cultural, social and historical activities, such as a prc' 
gram of colonial music, an old-fashioned sleigh ride, as well as a photo contest featuring Wilmington's pas 
has created the funds necessary to acquire several worthwhile pieces of furniture and articles of interest 
which are now on permanent display at the Tavern. In addition, through the generosity of a number of resici 
several other interesting pieces have been acquired either on loan or as outright gifts. 

With the assistance of the Commission, the Wilmington Women's Club availed itself of the resources of the 
Harnden Tavern by presenting a well-executed, and equally well-attended, art exhibition and sale. 

As we look forward to an even more productive year ahead, the Historical Commission takes this opportunity 
thank all those who have encouraged and supported us in our efforts to preserve and protect the local histc 
cal heritage of our Town. 



44 



I 



Water & Sewer Department 



PUMPING STATISTICS 



A.TER SUPPLY 


1973 


1974 


1975 


1976 


1977 


aximum Gallons Per Day 


4,370,000 


4,120,000 


4,364,000 


4,922,000 


4,421,000 


aximum Gallons Per Week 


23,202,000 


23,961,000 


26,641,000 


31,232,000 


26,521,000 


aximum Gallons Per Month 


91,448,000 


97,404,000 


105,599,000 


116,396,000 


102,432,000 


verage Gallons Per Day 


2,624,000 


2,557,000 


2,647,000 


2,762,000 


2,840,000 


verage Gallons Per Month 


79,838,000 


77,790,000 


80,508,000 


84,006,000 


86,375,000 


DIAL GALLONS PER YEAR 


958,051,000 


933,478,000 


966,090,000 


1,008,080,000 


1,036,494,000 


anual Rainfall 


46.26" 


37.90" 


50.97" 


34.67" 


46.31" 




CONSUMPTION STATISTICS- 


-GALLONS 






ssidential Use* 


288,843,244 


302,309,627 


324,240,479 


329,744,851 


398,858,053 


arcent of Total 


41.4% 


42.0% 


46.8% 


44.6% 


51.4% 


idustrial Use 


406,449,978 


417,011,892 


369,269,678 


409,497,779 


376,981,836 


arcent of Total 


58.4% 


57.9% 


53.2% 


55.3% 


48.6% 


Jtal Water Metered 


695,293,222 


719,321,519 


693,510,157 


739,242,630 


775,839,889 


2rcent of Water Pumped** 


72.5% 


77.0% 


72.0% 


73.3% 


74.9% 



tesidential use includes small commercial users, that is, all water passing through 5/8" meters only. 



*The difference between the water pumped and the water metered, 260,654,111 gallons in 1977, represents 
Iter used for flushing of water mains, for fires and other hydrant uses, and water lost due to breaks and 
^akage throughout the system. 

^TER SUPPLY : 

3 can be seen from the above tables, the Town's water consumption continues to increase. The demand on our 
imping facilities is at it's peak during the summer months. It was necessary to impose restrictions on the 
itside use of water during the summer months. Without these restrictions, our storage facilities would have 
2en depleted to a dangerous level. It is expected that the same water restrictions will be needed during 
)78. 

^ter conservation will have to become part of everyone's daily life. Conservation is not the answer to our 
iter supply problems, however, it is a part of good water supply management. Additional water supply is go- 
ig to be needed in the immediate future. Water supply facilities require many years of planning and construc- 
Lon before the first drop of water can be used. While conservation practices may "stretch" the available 
Iter supply, they must not be allowed to delay action on critical issues which will guarantee the continued 
ipply of good quality water. 



45 



At the present time, two wells with a capacity of 1.5 million gallons per day are shut down due to excessiv 
amounts of iron and manganese. A new treatment process for treating iron and manganese known as the Vyredo 
System was investigated. This system has been used successfully in Europe, but has never been attempted in 
the United States. In an effort to determine the feasibility of using this process on one of our wells pre 
ently not in use, a pilot plant was installed at the Butters Row well. The operation drew a lot of attenti 
from State health officials because of the novel nature of the process. The tests were completed in Novemb 
At this time, the results are being evaluated and a report is expected in January. 

It appears that if we are to continue to supply the residents with a sufficient quantity of good quality wa 
a treatment plant will be needed to treat the wells shut down due to iron and manganese. This treatment ma 
involve the new Vyredox System and/or conventional water treatment. We plan to have an article for a treat 
ment plant ready for the Annual Town Meeting. 

The rehabilitation program at Brown's Crossing Wellfield consisting of replacing the old 2 1/2 inch tubular 
wells with 4 inch wells continued. The work is now 70% complete. The capacity of the wellfield has been 1 
creased from 0.8 million gallons per day to 1.0 million gallons per day. A Federal grant in the amount of 
$52,000. was used to finance a portion of this work. 

To reduce the water system's vulnerability to power outages, we began a program of providing standby auxili 
power at several of the pumping stations. A propane gas engine was purchased for the Salem Street Pumping 
Station. When the installation is completed early in 1978, at a cost of $9,000., it will enable this stati 
to be operated during power failures. Another engine will be purchased for a second station during 1978. 

It was necessary to clean and redevelop several wells which had diminished in capacity due to iron encrusta 
tion. This is a common maintenance problem with wells. It will be necessary to clean several wells a year 
on a rotating basis. 

WATER QUALITY : 

On June 24, 1977, an important Federal regulation pertaining to water quality went into effect. This act, 
known as the "Safe Drinking Water Act", contains regulations which specify maximum contaminant levels for 
chemical and microbiological constitufents, monitoring frequencies, public motif ication and reporting requir 
ments. The additional monitoring requires us to take 26 samples per month at a monthly cost of $140.00. 
These samples indicate that our water supply meets EPA standards for bacterial quality. We do experience, 
however, water quality problems in the system due to the iron and manganese content of the water. For the 
most part, periodic flushing of the water mains alleviates the problems associated with iron and manganese 
"rusty" water. 

WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM : 

A grant from the Economic Development Administration in the amount of $590,000. was used to strengthen the 
distribution system. This grant was made under Round II of the Local Public Works Program. The improvemen 
consist of a 12 inch reinforcing main between our two storage tanks which will permit better utilization of 
the Hillside Way tank and provide more equal pressure distribution throughout the Town; the second half of 
the project consists of a 12 inch reinforcing main on Salem Street which will eliminate a bottleneck in the 
distribution system, which will result in a more efficient pumping. The contract for this work has been 
awarded and construction will be completed in the summer of 1978. 

METERS : 

A meter testing program was initiated for all meters 3 inches and larger. There are 18 such meters in the 
system. They are used by the largest consumers. The re-calibration of these large meters will result in a 
ditional water revenue. In addition, the reading of these meters was changed to monthly; billing remains c 
a quarterly basis. 

SEWER SYSTEM 

Construction of Phase II of the Silver Lake Interceptor began during the fall. The program consists of abc 
14 miles of sanitary sewer which will improve the ground water quality in the Silver Lake area and in North 
Wilmington. The program has been broken down into seven contracts. Three contracts were awarded in 1977 a 
construction started on two of these. Before construction started, many months were spent in planning, hee 
ings, reports and obtaining local. State and Federal approvals. The construction has caused some problems 
and inconveniences. We are attempting to keep these problems to a minimum. 

After receiving approval from the 1977 Annual Town Meeting, the Water & Sewer Board sponsored an amendment 
to Chapter 297 of the Acts of 1958 which increased the sewer betterment interest from 4% to 5%. This bring 
the sewer betterment in line with the interest on water betterments. 



46 



nnual contracts were renewed with Billerica and Tewbsbury to allow them to dump septage wastes into an MDC 
anhole on Woburn Street. Approval was received from the MDC for this dumping. Wilmington receives $10,000. 
er year from each town. 

he MDC is requiring closer monitoring of this septage dumping. This will require the purchase of land and 
he construction of a small building to house an attendant. 

n 1977 Mr. Arnold Blake did not accept reappointment to the Board of Water and Sewer Commissioners. He con- 
ributed 19 years of dedicated service to the Town. His vacancy on the Board was not filled during the year. 




Construction of New Sanitary Sewer Trunk Line 



47 



Jury List 



(Revised - August 1, 1977) 



NAME 


RESIDENCE 


OCCUPATION 


Allaire, Paul D. 


22 Biggar Avenue 


Restaurant Chef 


Allard, Russell A. 


33 Clark Street 


Journeyman, Electrician 


Allard, Albert L. 


17 Cedarcrest Road 


Prod, Manager 


Allen, Mary E. 


5 Ridge Road 


Housewife 


Allen, Robert E. 


13 Muse Avenue 


Locomotive Engineer 


Amaro, John R. 


Boutwell Street 


General Supervisor 


Amicangioli , Gladys I. 


857 Main Street 


Electronics, Assembly Li: 


Anderson, April A. 


3 Hathaway Road 


Accounts Receivable Supr 


Anderson, Elizabetli 


337 Salem Street 


At home 


Arbing, Helen 


18 Dobson Street 


Packer 


Arnold, Gary L. 


29 Dorchester Street 


Service Sta. dealer/owne: 


Aruda, Barry 0. 


15 McDonald Road 


Unemp 1 oyed 


As lanis , Karen Ann 


522 Shawsheen Avenue 


Housewife 


Atamian, Harry N. 


14 Hathaway Road 


Sr. Draftsman 


Badiali, Juliette V. 


35 Marcia Road 


Hous ewi f e 


Bahia, Walter 


48 Marcia Road 


Postal Clerk 


Baker, Irene B. 


127 Grove Avenue 


Home Health Care 


Baker, Kathleen M. 


1 Mystic Avenue 


Senior Clerk 


Baker, Raymond J. , Jr. 


1 Mystic Avenue 


Extruder Operator 


R^iT*}^P»T" Ronfllfi T 

UCL^ C JL , LLa «J • 






Barclay, Rowena 0. 


436 Middlesex Avenue 


Housewife 


Barry, Leo G. 


8 Chandler Road 


Supervisor Data Processi 


Barry, Mary 


8 Chandler Road 


Engineering Clerk 


Barry, Richard V. 


8 Longview Road 


Manager 


Berry, William E. 


36 Forest Street 


Mfgr. /Welding & Heat. Eq 


Beville, John A. 


4 Cedarcrest Road 


Shoeworker 


Bibeau, Arthur J. 


10 South Street 


Elevator Assembler/Engrai 


Billings, Weyman H. 


21 St rout Avenue 


Sr. Prod. Eng. i 


Bimbo, Anthony 


21 Marjorie Road 


Tool & Die Maker 1 


Bonarrigo, Carmen M. 


6 Marcus Road 


Audit Manager i 


Booth, Raymond C. 


38 Lowell Street 


Self-employed salesman i 


Boylen, Rosemary E. 


2 Ledgewood Road 


Unemployed 1 


Bradley, Henry E., Jr. 


20 North Street 


Maintenance Dept. 1 


Brans combe, Robert E. 


8 Maple Street 


Chemical Worker 1 


Brans field, Marion E. 


15 Glendale Circle 


Jr. Clerk Typist 1 


Breau, Joseph E. 


41 North Street 


Engineman 


Brewster, Ann M. 


13 Shady Lane Drive 


Waitress 


Bristol, Walter Joseph, Sr. 


399 Shawsheen Avenue ' 


Supervisor 


Burpee, Henrietta A. 


1 Grove Avenue 


Technician 


Capone, Donald W. 


20 Hillside Way 


Insurance Writer i 


Casey, John P, 


1 Lucaya Circle 


Repairman 


Capozzi, James M. 


190 Chestnut Street 


Examiner 


Capritta, Anthony 


38 Congress Street 


Energy Consultant 


Carlson, Roy H., Jr. 


10 Jones Avenue 


Welder 


Catalano, Alice V. 


12 Cedar Crest Road 


Cafeteria Worker 


Clark, John C. 


28 Sheldon Avenue 


N. E. Sales Mgr. 



48 



RESIDENCE 



OCCUPATION 



203 Aldrich Road 


Clerk-typist 


19 Faulkner Avenue 


Executive Secretary 


40 Park Street 


Plant Arranger 


10 Hamlin Lane 


Insurance Agent 


15 Suncrest Avenue 


Computer Programmer /Analyst 


13 Central Street 


Supr. of Financial Program 


27 Hillside Way 


Purchasing Agent 


29 Fairmont Avenue 


Assistant Manager 


14 Harris Street 


Machinist 


30 MacDonald Road 


Project Engineer 


3 Chase Road 


1st Line Supervisor 


53 Swain Road 


Waveguide Machinist 


Hiiisiae way 


Industrial Sales & Service 


27 Richmond Street 


Printing Dept. Packer 


290 Middlesex Avenue 


Furniture Salesman 


46 Lawrence Street 


Bank Examiner 


10 Thurston Avenue 


N. E. Tel. 6c Tel. 


7 Shady Lane Drive 


Group Leader QC Insp, 


9 Pilling Road 


Licensed Electrician 


58 Glen Road 


Quality Control Tech. 


15 Belmont Avenue 


Asst. Dir. Physical Plant 


322 Woburn Street 


Saleswoman 


42 Adams Street 


Self-employed Tax Consultant 


Kilmarnock Street 


Rep . Gas Co . 


8 Hillside Way 


Disabled 


lo OaKdaie Road 


At home 


18 Oakdale Road 


Unemployed 


69 Butters Row 


Letter Carrier 


29 Marcia Road 


Repairman 


6 School Street 


Secretary 


4 Rollins Road 


Carpenter 


9 Burnham Street 


Staff buyer 


52 Federal Street 


Flight Crew Scheduling 


2 Muse Avenue 


Housewife 


39 Lawrence Street 


Insurance Salesman 


97 Grove Avenue 


Retired 


3 Morgan Road 


Accounting Mgr. 


56 Main Street 


Ass' t. Credit Mgr. 


10 Shawsheen Avenue 


Mfg. Engineering 


Kilmarnock Street 


Metal Spinner 


397 Salem Street 


Unemployed 


45 Butters Row 


Dir. Sr. Citizens Program 


12 Lloyd Road 


Information Clerk 


36 Oakdale Road 


Mechanic 


17 Kenwood Avenue 


Sr. Systems Analyst 


17 Marcia Road 


Technical Instr. 


42 B West Street 


Housewife 


44 Dell Drive 


Asst. Parts Mgr. 


65 Salem Street 


Retail Sales Mgr. 


5 Seaford Street 


Unemployed 


4 Shady Lane Drive 


Unemployed 


8 Lawn Street 


Clerk 


113 Grove Avenue 


Retired 


23 School Street 


Jr. Civil Engineer 


88 Clark Street 


Gen. Ins. Agent 


34 Glen Road 


Sr. Workmen's Comp. Exam. 


25 Dell Drive 


Clerk 


42 Marcia Road 


Elec. Prod. Engineer 


3 Randolph Road 


Account Adm. 



49 



Jury List: (continued) 



NAME 


RESIDENCE 


OCCUPATION 


Loder, Joseph P. 


7 Pinewood Road 


Bus Operator 


Logan, Annette L. 


7 Marcia Road 


P. T. Student 


London, Olin M. 


120 Church Street 


Systems Analyst 


Lovrry, Thaddeus J. 


24 Moore Street 


Sr. System Analyst 


Lunetta, Linda A, 


2 Nunn Road 


Sales Rep. 


Lux, Ralph 0. 


7 Biggar Avenue 


Vice President 


Lynch, Bernice 


98 Grove Avenue 


Housewife 


Lynch, Marilynn H. 


100 Grove Avenue 


Housewife 


Macaluso, Grace C. 


259 Main Street 


Secretary 


MacCarthy, Leo M. 


8 Amherst Road 


Letter Carrier 


Mader, Norbert K. 


6 Drury Lane 


Chemis t 


Manning, William J., Jr. 


8 Lloyd Road 


Unemp loyed 


Marchant, Carol J. 


4 Lloyd Road 


Assembly Line Worker 


Marchant, Debra 


4 Lloyd Road 


Accounts Payable Clerk 


Marino, Antonio S. 


3 Linda Road 


Credit Manager 


Mathews , Robert J . 


7 Redwood Terrace 


Shipping Clerk 


Matonis, Julius 


40 Fairmeadow Road 


Mechanic 


Mauriello, Frank P. 


50 West Street 


Data Entry Mgr. 


McCain, Esther V. 


4 Harris Street 


Homemaker 


McCain, James G. 


4 Harris Street 


Maint. & Bowling Mechanic 


McCann, Maryann 


64 Lawrence Street 


Housewife 


McCarthy, Joseph F. 


14 Birchwood Road 


Transp. Asst. Mgr. 


McHugh, Robert L. 


31 Glen Road 


Cost Estimator 


McQuaid, Everett P. 


71 Middlesex Avenue 


Elec. Engineer 


McKenzie, John G. 


18 Pinewood Road 


Truck Driver 


McLaughlin, Michael J. 


Ballardvale Street 


Self-employed 


Meegan, Alfred N. 


48 McDonald Road 


Indus t. Lift Mechanic 


Miselis, Lillian T. 


154 Federal Street 


Housewife 


Morelli, Alfred F. 


7 Webber Street 


He liar c Welder 


Morrissette, Richard A. 


11 Dadant Drive 


Electronic Dev. Engr. 


Morrissey, James F. 


139 Salem Street 


Mechanic 


Murphy, Edward J. 


300 Salem Street 


Signal Maintainer 


Moulton, Lloyd G. 


2 Meadow Lane 


Sheetmetal Worker 


Murray, Audrey E. 


173 Wildwood Street 


At Home 


Murray, Evangeline E. 


2 Laurel Avenue 


At Home 


Noelcke, Carl L,, Jr. 


15 Roberts Road 


Chm. Design Rev. Bd. 


Oikle, Philip A. 


3 Fletcher Lane 


Q. C. & Audit Engr. 


Penney, Marilyn Y. 


3 Glenview Road 


Order Filler 


Phillips, Brian C. 


21 Clark Street 


Parts Dept. 


Pierce, William A. 


712 Woburn Street 


Setup for Fabrication 


Pilla, Helen 


135 Wildwood Street 


Homemaker 


Proctor, Richard W. 


33 R Melrose Avenue 


Purchasing Agent 


Radochia, Walter J. 


256 Woburn Street 


Water Meter Reader/Insp. 


Regan, Cornelius J. 


5 St. Paul Street 


Mech. Inspector 


Ring, John S . , Jr. 


Cunningham Street 


Systems Programmer 


Ritchie, Charles E. 


18 Kelley Road 


Postal Supervisor 


Robicheau, Joseph R. 


14 Marcus Road 


Auto Body Mech. 


Ronan, Bernard J. 


197 Middlesex Avenue 


Janitor 


Russell, William H. 


10 Wildwood Street 


Retired 


Ryan, Philip W. 


18 Wilson Street 


Wholesale Dept. 


Schultz, Mary F. 


5 Randolph Road 


Sub-teacher, Kitchen Work 


Semmler, Robert C. 


4 Birchwood Road 


Welder 


Shea, Ernest F. 


773 Salem Street 


Owner of Cement Prod. Co. 


Sheehan, Dorothy T. 


8 Concord Street 


Housewife 


Smith, Carl R. 


6 Harnden Street 


Foreman 


Smith, Richard K. 


7 Dorothy Avenue 


Design Analyst 


Spinney, Chester R. , Jr. 


3 Pineridge Road 


Semi-retired-grocery 


Stevens, Francis W. 


195 Federal Street 


Unemployed 


Sullivan, John P. 


14 Crest Avenue 


Grocery Clerk 


TenHuisen, Harold J. 


54 Chestnut Street 


Chief Accountant 


Trigllio, James A. 


230 Lowell Street 


Adm. Supply Tech. 



50 



T List 



(continued) 



NAME 



RESIDENCE 



OCCUPATION 



irtus, John T. 
oner, Joseph T. 
oiler, Elmer H. 
ood, Carolyn C. 
oodbury, Richard B. 
oodside, Lillian M. 
entile, Thomas W. 
oung, Donald 
accagnini, Lorenzo i 
immerman. Earl W. 



6 Ridge Road 

9 Pleasant Road 
29 Main Street 
18A Mystic Avenue 
16 Roberts Road 
14 Roberts Road 
45 Shawsheen Avenue 
8 State Street 
305 Middlesex Avenue 

7 Charlotte Road 



Supervisor 
Cement Finisher 
Supervisor of Maintenance 
Cost Clerk 
Service Manager 
Housewife 

Sr. Engineering Aid 
Self-employed 
Press Operator 
Ind. Engineer 




Sgt. James Palmer Graduates from F. B. I. Academy 
51 



Board of Appeals 



Applicant 
Case #1-77 

Graham Builders, Owner 

Ms. Donna Simmons 

Roberts Carpet Co., Applicant 



Case #2 


-77 


John J. 


Freitas 


Case #3 


-77 


Rolland 


L. Sturtevant 


Case #4 


-77 



Alan F. Chapman 



Case #5-77 

Ronald & Ruth Cuthill 
Joseph F. Courtney, Agent 



Case #6-77 

James V. Campbell 

Case #7-77 

Henry E. Boisvert 

Case #8-77 

Susan and Neil Buckley 
Case #9-77 

Ralph M. Plummer, III 

Case #10-77 

James V. DeCarolis 

Case #11-77 
Ronald F. Harvey 

Case #12-77 
Frank J. McGivern 



Reason for Appeal 



For a variance to erect additional signs, area in excess 
of the shopping plaza master plan, within the required 
reserve yard area at 474 Main Street. 



For a variance to erect a carport within a required side 
yard at 3 Frederick Drive. 



For a variance to erect a shed within the required reserve 
side yard area at 17 Hillside Way. 



For a variance from Section 1-2-B of the Zoning By-Laws 
(storage of contractor's equipment - school bus - in a 
residentially zoned area at 9 Marcus Road. 



For a variance to sub-divide a parcel of land into two lots 
each having insufficient area and depth in order to obtain 
a building permit for the construction of a single family 
residence at 13 Cunningham Street. 



For a variance to enlarge a building for an existing non- 
conforming use. Section VI-IC, at 139 Main Street. 



For a variance to build an addition to the existing dwelling 
within a required reserve side yard area at 23 Amherst Road. 



For a variance to build an addition to the existing dwelling 
within the required reserve side yard at 13 Brattle Street. 



For a variance to erect a garage within the required reserve 
side and rear yard areas at 10 Dobson Avenue. 



For a variance to install driveway within a flood plain area 
on Woburn Street (Assessor's Map 85, Part of Lot 7C) . 



For a variance to erect a single family dwelling on a lot 
having sufficient frontage and area, but lacking the re- 
quired depth at every point along the lot frontage on 
Roberts Road (Assessor's Map 17, Lot 17L) . 



For a varinace to erect a single family dwelling on a lot 
having more than the required area but lacking sufficient 
frontage on Middlesex Avenue (Assessor's Map 79, Lot 7A) . 



Denied 



Denied 



Grantee 



Withdrav 



52 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



se #13-77 

ewart M. Trickett 

seph F. Courtney, Agent 



se #14-77 

ewart M. Trickett 

seph F. Courtney, Agent 



For a varinace to erect a single family dwelling on lot Denied 
having insufficient frontage, depth and area on Chelsea 
Street (Assessor's Map 41, Lot 135C) . 



For a variance to erect a single family dwelling on a lot Denied 
having insufficient frontage, depth, and area on Chelsea 
Street (Assessor's Map 41, Lot 135A) . 



se #15-77 

mes V. DeCarolis 



se #16-77 

awsheen Valley Vocational 
chnical High School 



se #17-77 

ephen F. Bottari 

seph F. Courtney, Agent 



se #18-77 

ephen F. Bottari 

seph F. Courtney, Agent 



se #19-77 
wn of Reading 
micipal Light Dept. 
D. Rhinerson, Agent 

se #20-77 

orge and Bette Robicheau 



se #21-77 
seph Valasi 



j se #22-77 

ter Carbone & Sons, Inc. 



he #23-77 
■F.L. Realty Corp. 
Srnard F. Wagstaff, Sr. 
fiderick Jackson, Agent 

[ ie #24-77 

labone Corp., Applicant 
I;5 Income Prop . , Owner 
Jseph F. Courtney, Agent 



For a varinace to erect a single family dwelling on a lot Granted 
having sufficient frontage and area but lacking the re- 
quired depth at every point along the frontage on Federal 
Street (Assessor's Map 64, Lot 4). 



For a variance to erect a sign larger than that which is Granted 
permitted by Section III-l-A-9h of the Zoning By-Laws on 
a lot on Boutwell Street (Assessor's Map 18, Lot 7A) . 



For a variance to erect a single family dwelling on a lot Denied 
having insufficient frontage, depth, and area on Christine 
Drive (Assessor's Map 53, Lot 14J; Map 44, Lots 144 & 146). 



For a variance to erect a single family dwelling on a lot Denied 
having insufficient depth and area on Christine Drive 
(Assessor's Map 53, Lots 14K and 14L) . 



For a variance to enlarge a non-conforming use (Electric Granted 
Substation) in accordance with Section VI-l-C on Wildwood 
Street (Assessor's Map 50, Lot 105). 



For a variance to sub-divide an existing lot into two non- Granted 
conforming lots , with less than the minimum side yard re- 
quirements, at 6 McDonald Road. 



For a variance to change the use gioup of a lamp shop and Granted 
repair service to an office for business use at 30 Lowell St. 



For a variance authorizing permission to establish a cream- Denied 
ery, milk distribution station in accordance with Section 
III-4-B-2 of the Zoning By-Laws at 874 Main Street. 



For a variance and/or special permit authorizing an automotive Granted 
repair shop in an Industrial District at 200 Andover Street. 



For a variance from the off-street parking requirements of the Granted 
Wilmington Zoning By-Law as specified in Section IV-3 of said 
By-Law, in order to authorize a building permit for a 7500 
square foot addition to an existing industrial building occupied 
by Compugraphic Corp. as lessee and located at 66 Concord St. 



53 




Applicant 
Case #25-77 

Northeastern Engine Works 
L.F.L. Realty Corporation 
Joseph F. Courtney, Agent 

Case #26-77 
Wesley C. Nelson 
Jon-Nel Realty Trust 
Joseph F. Courtney, Agent 

Case #27-77 

Wilmington Board of Water 
& Sewer Commissioners 

Case #28-77 

Wilmington Board of Water 
& Sewer Commissioners 

Case #29-77 

David J. Cronin, Tenant 
L.F.L. Realty Corp. 
Frederick Jackson, Agent 
Leland Jackson, Agent 

Case #30-77 

Dunkirk Express, Tenant 
Frederick Jackson, Agent 
Leland Jackson, Agent 
Simon Cutter, Agent 

Case #31-77 
Paul J. Howell 



Reason for Appeal 



For a variance authorizing the use in an Industrial District 
of an Engine Rebuilding Shop and Machine Shop in accordance 
with Section III-4-B-5 of the Zoning By-Laws on property 
located on 200 Andover Street. 



For a variance to sub-divide a parcel of land on Roosevelt 
and Taft Road into two building lots, one with insufficient 
area and depth, and one with Insufficient area, frontage, and 
depth (Assessor's Map 19, Lot 55). (Granted for one lot only) 



For a special permit to allow for the construction of a Sanitary 
Sewerage Pumping Station on a lot having Insufficient depth and 
area located on Pilcher Drive (Assessor's Map 82, Lot 155A) . 



For a special permit to allow for the public use of land located 
in the flood plain district in accordance with Section III-6-C 
(Assessor's Map 26, Lot 9; Map 30, Lot 13; Map 31, Lot 13). 



For a variance and/or a special permit in accordance with 
Section III-4-B-5 for the purpose of doing all types of weld- 
ing at 200 Andover Street. 



For a variance and/or a special permit in accordance with 
Section III-A-B-5 of the Zoning By-Laws for the storage and 
cleaning of tractor trailers at 200 Andover Street. 



For a variance to install a swimming pool within the required 
reserve side yard area at 279 Shawsheen Avenue. 



Decisic ■ 



Grante 



Grant* 



Granttt 



Granti 



Granti 



Grant! 



Granti 



Case #32-77 
Kevin D. Harrigan 



For a variance to build an addition to the existing dwelling 
within the required reserve side yard areas at 29 Marion St. 



Grant 



Case #33-77 

Philip and Betty Welmer 



For a variance and/or special permit authorizing the sale of 
candy products at retail from a single family residence at 
34 Burlington Avenue. 



Denie . 



Case #34-77 
Richard Braden 



For a variance to enlarge an existing dwelling on a non- 
conforming lot, addition to be within the required reserve 
side and front yards at 6 River Street. 



Grant 



Case #35-77 

David Kindred, Applicant 
Joseph F. Courtney, Agent 
Anna J. Jensen, Owner 



For a variance to sub-divide a parcel of land on Andover Street 
into building lots with insufficient depth (Assessor's Map 
104, Lot 3A) . 



Grant 



54 



Applicant 



Reason fo r Appeal 



Decision 



SB #36-77 

ephen & Margaret Whitney 
oyd P. Smith, Agent 



To appeal the determination of the Building Official denying 
a building permit and, alternatively, to obtain authorization 
for a building permit for a non-conforming use pursuant to 
Section III-1-A-9-G of the Zoning By-Laws for property located 
at 132 Salem Street. 



Denied 



se #37-77 
omas Sullivan 



se #38-77 
ward C. Hill 



For a variance to allow for the construction of a single 
family dwelling within a required reserve front yard area 
on Commonwealth Ave. (Assessor's Map 40, Lot 160). 



For a variance to build a single family dwelling on a lot on 
Clyde Avenue having insufficient area and depth (Assessor's 
Map 55, Lot 249). 



Granted 



Granted 



se #39-77 
rjorie E. Wilson 
lliam C. Wagner, Agent 



For a variance to sub-divide a lot which is located in a SRA 
Zone into two lots; seeking variances from Section V (V-1) 
as to lot frontage; V-5 as to measurements of right angles 
at 19 Shawsheen Avenue. 



Denied 



se #40-77 

ymond and Diane Lepore 



For a variance from required reserve side yard area setback 
on a lot on Parker Avenue (Assessor's Map 50, Lot 20). 



Granted 



se #41-77 

niel B. Halliday 



For a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of Requirements to 
allow for the subdivision of a certain parcel of land at 28 
Butters Row into two non-conforming lots (Assessor's Map 27, 
Lot 4) . 



Granted 



se #42-77 

lliam & Audrey Paolini 
seph F. Courtney, Agent 



For a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of Requirements) to 
allow for the subdivision of a certain parcel of land at 120 
Faulkner Avenue into two non-conforming lots (Assessor's Map 
69, Lots 22 and 24). 



Granted 



36 #43-77 

bert R. Butters, Sr. 



For a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of Requirements) to 
allow for the construction of a shed within a required reserve 
side yard at 40 Middlesex Avenue. 



Granted 



#44-77 
in & Dolores Marshall 



ie #45-77 
f.hony Paolini 
'';eph F. Courtney, Agent 



For a special permit pursuant to Section III-l-B-2 of the 
Zoning By-Law to authorize physicians' professional offices 
and related medical services and health care as a limited 
ambulatory care center at 255 Lowell Street. 



For a special permit pursuant to Section II-l-B-5 to authorize 
operation of a non-profit clubhouse and lodge on premises at 
Ballardvale Street (Assessor's Map R-3, Lot 43). 



Granted 



Denied 



e #46-77 
rence J. Flynn 



For a variance to build an addition to the existing dwelling 
within the required reserve front yard area at 7 Dewey Avenue. 



Granted 



55 



Applicant 

Case #47-77 

Joseph Langone 

Joseph F. Courtney, Agent 

Case #48-77 

Joseph Langone 

Joseph F. Courtney, Agent 

Case #49-77 

Church Street Hardware 
Simon Cutter, Agent 



Case #50-77 
Thomas F. Miller 



Reason for Appeal 



For a variance to allow the construction of twelve single 
family dwellings on 12 lots on Mill Road, each having in- 
sufficient depth (Assessor's Map 3, Lots 9 and 110). 



For a variance to allow a lot with an existing single family 
dwelling on Chestnut Street having insufficient frontage on 
Chestnut Street (Assessor's Map 3, Lot 109). 



For a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of Requirements) 
to allow for the subdivision of a parcel of land into two 
non-conforming lots both having more than the minimum re- 
quired area located at 3 Church Street. 



For a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of Requirements) 
to allow for the construction of a carport within a required 
reserve side yard located at 41 Park Street. 



Case #51-77 

Henry & Janet Gilhooly 
Ernest Delledonne, App. 



For a variance from Section IV-1 which requires a permanent 
means of access not less than thirty (30) feet in width 
located at 29 Lake Street. 



Case #52-77 
Richard Proctor 
Simon Cutter, Agent 



For a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of Requirements) 
to allow for the subdivision of a parcel of land into two 
non-conforming lots both having insufficient frontage, 
depth, and area located at 33R Melrose Avenue. 



Case #53-77 

John T. Spinelli Co. 

Thomas Regan, Agent 



Case #54-77 

William and Barbara Frey 



For a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of Requirements) 
to allow a sign to be erected within a required reserve 
front yard located at 56 Jonspin Road. 



For a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of Requirements) 
to construct an addition within a required reserve side yard 
located at 46 Middlesex Avenue. 



Case #55-77 

Thomas & Nancy Yentile 
Paul and Ruth York 



For a variance from the Wilmington Zoning By-Law to divide 
the parcels of land pursuant to the plan submitted and to 
make both lots legal non-conforming lots in all respects, 
including, but not limited to frontage, lot size, and set 
backs pursuant to the Zoning By-Law located at 45 Shawsheen 
Avenue and 49 Shawsheen Avenue. 



Case #56-77 
John C. Clark 



Case #57-77 
Clifton E. Wheeler 



For a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of Requirements) 
to allow for the construction of an addition within a re- 
quired reserve yard located at 28 Sheldon Avenue. 



For a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of Requirements) 
to allow for the construction of a garage within a required 
reserve side yard located at 10 Freeport Drive. 



Grant 



Grant€ 



56 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



ase //58-77 

ompugraphic Corporation 
. Theodore Cohen, Agent 



ase #59-77 

ompugraphic Corporation 
. Theodore Cohen, Agent 



ase //60-77 

ompugraphic Corporation 
. Theodore Cohen, Agent 



ase #61-77 

ompugraphic Corporation 
. Theodore Cohen, Agent 



Pursuant to Article 1, Section 110.0 of the Commonwealth Granted 
of Massachusetts State Building Code for a variance from 
the provisions of Article 3, Section 309.2 of the State 
Building Code so as to allow the construction of a one and 
two-story building on a lot comprised of two parcels adja- 
cent to 80 Industrial Way with a 2C type of construction and 
minimum fire separation of 45 feet, 6 inches. 



Pursuant to Section VIII-4.B.3 of the Town of Wilmington Granted 

Zoning By-Law for a variance from the provisions of Section 

II, Definitions Paragraph 10, Parking Space, of the Zoning 

By-Law so as to allow the use of parking spaces having a 

width of not less than nine (9) feet for parking one motor 

vehicle, on land owned or leased by the Applicant adjacent 

to 80 Industrial Way. 



Pursuant to Section VIII-4.B.3 of the Town of Wilmington Granted 
Zoning By-Law for a variance from the provisions of Section 
IV, Special Regulations Governing Use Districts, Paragraph 
IV-3, Off-Street Parking, Subparagraph A, of the Zoning By- 
Law so as to allow the use of off-street parking more than 
300 feet from the principal building on land owned or leased 
by the Applicant adjacent to 80 Industrial Way. 



Pursuant to Section VIII-4.B.3 of the Town of Wilmington Granted 
Zoning By-Law for a variance from the provisions of Section 
IV Special Regulations Governing Use Districts, Paragraph 
IV-3 Off-Street Parking, Subparagraph A. , Sub-subparagraphs 
7 and 8, of the Zoning By-Law so as to allow the use of one 
parking space for each 150 square feet of floor area or frac- 
tion thereof devoted to the use as an office and one parking 
space for each 300 square feet of floor area devoted to manu- 
facturing and storage use in a building on land owned or 
leased by the applicant adjacent to 80 Industrial Way. 



ise #62-77 

ompugraphic Corporation 
Theodore Cohen, Agent 



Pursuant to Section VIII-4.B.3 of the Town of Wilmington Granted 
Zoning By-Law for a variance from the provisions of Section 
IV Special Regulations Governing Use Dis-tricts, Paragraph 
IV-3 Off-Street Parking, Subparagraph A., Sub-subparagraphs 
7 and 8, of the Zoning By-Law so as to allow the use of one 
parking space for each 150 square feet of floor area or frac- 
tion thereof devoted to the use as an office and one parking 
space for each 300 square feet of floor area devoted to manu- 
facturing and storage use in a building on land owned or 
leased by the Applicant adjacent to 80 Industrial Way. 



ise #63-77 

)mpugraphic Corporation 
il Theodore Cohen, Agent 



Pursuant to Section VIII-4.B.3 of the Town of Wilmington Granted 
Zoning By-Law for a variance from the provisions of Section 
IV, , Special Regulations Governing Use Districts, Paragraph 
IV-3, Off Street Parking, Sub-paragraph D, of the Zoning By- 
Law so as to allow the use of two contiguous lots in differ- 
ent ownership to provide the off-street parking for a principal 
building on land owned or leased by the Applicant adjacent to 
80 Industrial Way. 



57 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



Case #64-77 
Rocco Yentile 
Wilmington Seafoods 
Joseph Antoon, Agent 

Case #65-77 

Robert A. & Emily DeSantis 



For a variance to allow for the preparation and sale of 
cooked seafood and related products not for consumption on 
the premises at 415-417 Main Street. 

For a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of Requirements) 

to allow for the construction of an addition within a required 

reserve side yard area at 64 Glen Road. 



Denied 



Case #66-77 

Robert & Louise Surran 



For a variance from Section V-1 (Schedule of Requirements) 

to allow for the construction of an addition within a required 

reserve side yard at 13 Crest Avenue. 



Case #67-77 
Henry Chasen, Owner 
Lee's Variety and 
Cold Cut Center 
Richard J. Lee, Lessee 

Case #68-77 
Joanne L. Vilasi 
Peter C. DeGennaro 
Wm. H. Diamond, Agent 



Case #69-77 
Richard Wetzler 



Case #70-77 

Willard M. Swan 

Wm. C. Wagner, Agent 



Case #71-77 

James & Janet Surette 



Case #72-77 

Charles & Annie Baldwin 



Case #73-77 

Leonard P. Ouellette 



Case #74-77 

T. Edmond Garrity 



Case #75-77 

T. Edmond Garrity, Owner 
Thomas Garrity, Agent 



For a variance in accordance with Section III-3-B-5 to allow 
for the erection of signs not to exceed 100 sq. feet at 
510 Main Street. 



For a variance to subdivide a parcel of land into two non- 
conforming lots, one having insufficient frontage and the 
other insufficient depth located on land between Grove Avenue 
and Quincy Street (Assessor's Map 34, Lot 36). 



For a variance from Table V-1 (Schedule of Requirements) 
to allow for the construction of an addition (porch) within 
a required reserve front yard area on property located at 
28 Fairmont Avenue. 



For a variance to subdivide a lot which is located in an SRA 
Zone into two lots, seeking a variance from Section V-1 
(Schedule of Requirements) as to lot frontage (Assessor's 
Map 65, Lot 5B) . 



For a variance to allow for the construction of a swimming 
pool within a required reserve side yard at 19 Marcia Road. 



For a variance to construct a single- family dwelling on a 
lot having insufficient frontage after removing an existing 
building, located at 24 Cunningham Street. 



For a variance to build an addition within a required reserve 
front yard at 2 Allen Park Drive. 



For a variance from Table V-1 (Schedule of Requirements) and 
in particular lot frontage and depth requirements for three 
lots all having more than required area and to acquire per- 
mission to build single family dwellings on each, said prop- 
erty located on Concord Street (Assessor's Map 62, Lot 1). 



For a variance on a lot having insufficient frontage but more 
than six times the required area and to acquire permission to 
build a family dwelling located on Seaford Street. 



Denied 



Withdraw 



Grantee 



58 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



tse #76-77 

ickson Brothers, Inc. 
irrie Belle Kincaid 



ise #77-77 

)hn F. Gerrior, Jr. 



For a variance from Section V-5 lot depth of the Zoning By- 
Laws for seven lots having sufficient frontage and area, 
located on Mill Road (Assessor's Map 3, Lots 9 and 110). 



For a variance from Schedule of Requirements (Section V-1) 
to allow for the erection and construction of a tennis 
court within a required reserve side and rear yard at 7 
Burt Road. 



Withdrawn 



Denied 



ise #78-77 

Lilian F. Whi taker 



For a variance to authorize a subdivision of land into four 
building lots, three of which have Insufficient frontage 
and depth, and one which has insufficient depth on 157 
Lake Street. 



Denied 



tse #79-77 
)cor. Inc. 

:. E.S. Nuwayser, Agent 



For a special permit in accordance with Section II-4-B.4 for 
the raising and keeping of animals in an Indoor laboratory 
for medical and scientific research at 850 Main Street. 



Granted 



ise #80-77 

;wls & Margaret Carbone 



For a variance from Schedule of Requirements (Section V-1) 
to subdivide a parcel of land into two non-conforming lots, 
both having less than the minimum required frontage at 71 
Lowell Street. 



Denied 



ise #81-77 

:op & Go Sandwich Shop 
1. L. Keough, Agent 



For a variance from the provisions of the Zoning By-Laws to 
authorize the operation of a Sub and Sandwich Shop for the 
consumption and take-out of food and non-alcoholic beverages, 
without dancing or entertainment at a former sporting goods 
store located at 382 Middlesex Avenue. 



Granted 



ise #82-77 
Ichael D'Errlco 



For a variance from the Zoning By-Law Schedule of Require- 
ments (Section V-1) to subdivide a parcel of land into 
three (3) non-conforming lots on Park Street (Assessor's 
Map 92, Lot 3). 



Withdrawn 



se #83-77 
;hn W. Cutter 
.mco Transmission Co. 



For a variance to erect a sign within a required reserve 
front yard at 611 Main Street. 



Granted 



se #84-77 

S.H. Realty, Inc. 

H. Lotto, Agent 



For a variance from Schedule of Requirements (Section V-1 
of Zoning By-Laws) to erect a sign within a required reserve 
front yard and Section IV 3. A. 7 "off-street parking require- 
ments" for parcel of land on Main Street (Assessor's Map 42- 
Lots 22E-1 and 22E-2) . 



Granted 



:se #85-77 

.ul & Ruth St.Hllaire 
|.mon Cutter, Agent 



For a variance from Table V-1 (Schedule of Requirements to 
allow for a dwelling to be constructed within a required 
reserve front yard on Dorchester Avenue (Assessor's Map 11 - 
Parcel 52) . 



Granted 



se #86-77 
nald Stone 



For a variance from Table V-1 (Schedule of Requirements) to 
permit a structure to remain within a required reserve front 
yard at 12 Sheridan Road. 



Granted 



59 



t 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decisic 



Case #87-77 
Alan F. Chapman 



For a variance from Section 1-2. B of the Zoning By-Laws 
allowing for the open storage of contractor's equipment 
(school bus) in a residential area at 9 Marcus Road. 



Case #88-77 

John and Mary Harvey 



Case #89-77 
Paul Theodos 



For a variance to construct a single family dwelling on a lot 
having more than required area and depth but insufficient 
frontage at 6 Parker Street. 



For a special permit as specified in Section VIII-4-C to 
allow as an accessory use of an existing structure for 
dead storage and/or storage of non-commercial and/or com- 
mercial vehicles within said structure at 125 Glen Road. 



Grant 



Case #90-77 

Peter & Margaret Pellerin 



Case #91-77 
Lillian F. Whitaker 
Joseph F. Courtney, Agent 



For a variance to subdivide a lot into two non-conforming 
lots each having sufficient frontage on an accepted way, 
but insufficient depth and area at 84 Shawsheen Avenue. 



For a variance to authorize a subdivision of the parcel into 
four building lots, three of which have insufficient frontage 
and depth and one which has insufficient depth at 157 Lake St. 



Denie 



Case #92-77 

Dawson-Macdonald Realty Tr. 
Winston F. Corbett, Trustee 
Joseph F. Courtney, Agent 



For a variance from Section V-1 of the Wilmington Zoning By- 
Law to authorize a minimum front yard setback less than 50 
feet and a minimum setback from the center line of Woburn 
Street less than 75 feet for an existing building at 845 
Woburn Street. 



Grant 



Case #93-77 

Anthony & Eleanor Carnabuci 



For a special permit to allow for home occupation by the 
resident, a registered electrologist , at 30 Fairmont Ave. 



Denie 



Case #94-77 

Gloria S. Ferraguto 



Case #95-77 

Pasquale & Marion Stoia 



For a special permit as specified in Section VIII-4-C to 
allow for the alteration and conversion of a one-family 
detached dwelling at 178 Taft Road to accomodate a Mother- 
In-Law apartment. 



For a special permit to erect a carport within a required 
reserve side yard at 46 Washington Avenue . 



Grant 



Grant 



Case #S-40-77 

Chester H. & Dorothy Hall 



Case #S-41-77 

Joseph & Sally Brennan 



Case #S-42-77 
John J. D'Elia 
Eastern Realty Tr. 



For a variance to construct a single family dwelling on land 
owned by applicants on a way known as Lee Avenue (Assessor's 
Map 58, Lot 36). 



For a variance to construct a single family dwelling on land 
owned by applicants on a way known as Mill Road (Assessor's 
Map 3, Lot 7). 



For a variance to construct a single family dwelling on land 
owned by Eastern Realty Trust on a way known as Wabash Road 
(Assessor's Map 8, Lot 28B) . 



Grant 



Grant 



Granti 



60 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



For a variance to construct a single family dwelling on land 
owned by applicant on a way known as West Jamica Avenue 
(Assessor's Map 70, Lots 19 and 20). 



Denied 



For a variance to construct a single family dwelling on land 
owned by Joyce K. Brisbois on a way known as Fairview Avenue 
(Assessor's Map 41, Lots 86 and Part of 87). 



Granted 



For a variance to construct a single family dwelling on land 
owned by applicants on a way known as Fairfield Road 
(Assessor's Map 70, Parcels 35 and 36). 



Granted 



For a variance to construct a single family dwelling on land 
owned by applicant on a way known as Randolph Road 
(Assessor's Map 8, Parcel 62). 



Granted 



For a variance to construct a single family dwelling on land 
owned by Robert Erickson on a way known as Albany Street 
(Assessors Map 11, Parcel 21). 



Granted 




Wilmington Figure Skating Club 
61 



Accepted Streets 



STREET 




LOCATION 


LENGTH 


Adams Street 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Parker Street 


2,915 


Adelaide Street 


from 


Church Street to Middlesex Avenue 


666 


Aldrich Road 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 


6,740 


Allen Park Drive 


from 


Fairmont Avenue to Fairmont Avenue 


2,319 


Andover Street 


from 


Salem Street 


180 


Andover Street 


from 


Andover Line to beyond Woburn Street 


11,300 


Anthony Avenue 


from 


Salem Street to Catherine Avenue 


300 


Apollo Drive 


from 


Charlotte Road to Draper Drive 


300 


Arlene Avenue 


from 


Salem Street to Dorothy Avenue 


789 


Auburn Avenue 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


755 


Ayotte Street 


from 


Westdale Avenue to Crest Avenue 


240 


Baker Street 


from 


Brand Avenue to beyond Phillips Avenue 


684 


Baland Road 


from 


Ballardvale Street 


540 


R*!! 1 »>T"/^irQl £^ C t- V t- 

Dcti.J.clZ-UVclJ>c: oLI-CCL 


from 


Odi-ClU OLLCCL. L L> x\OLlLc 




Ballardvale Street 


from 


Route 125 to Andover Line 


12,000 


Bancroft Street 


from 


Liberty Street 


400 


Barbara Avenue 


from 


Anthony Avenue to Dorothy Avenue 


850 


Beacon Street 


from 


Church Street to Belmont Avenue 


970 


Beech Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Byron Street 


1,005 


Beeching Avenue 


from 


Cunningham Street to Faulkner Avenue 


440 


Belmont Avenue 


from 


Columbia Street to State Street 


980 


Benson Road 


from 


Radcliff Road to Tewksbury Line 


616 


Biggar Avenue 


from 


Salem Street to Ring Avenue 


1,282 


Birchwood Road 


from 


Shady Lane Drive 


1,197 


Birchwood Road 


from 


Judith Road 


400 


Boutwell Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Aldrich Road 


4,144 


Brand Avenue 


from 


Bridge Lane 


510 


Brand Avenue 


from 


Baker Street to beyond Wisser Street 


950 


Brattle Street 


from 


Massachusetts Avenue to Garden Avenue 


1,066 


Brentwood Avenue 


from 


Woburn Street to Woods ide Avenue 


1,017 


Bridge Lane 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


455 


Bridge Lane 


from 


Main Street to beyond Brand Avenue 


754 


Broad Street 


from 


King Street 


1,377 


Burlington Avenue 


from 


Main Street to Burlington Line 


8,588 


Burnap Street 


from 


Grove Avenue 


1,145 


Burnap Street 


from 


Winchell Road 


484 


Burt Road 


from 


Cedar Street to beyond Water Street 


1,653 


Butters Row 


from 


Main Street to Chestnut Street 


3,577 


Buzzell Drive 


from 


Draper Drive to Evans Drive 


600 


Canal Street 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Burt Road 


1,505 


Carolyn Road 


from 


North Street to Marcia Road 


1,268 


Carson Avenue 


from 


Marie Drive to beyond Hathaway Road 


1,017 


Carter Lane 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to beyond Norfolk Avenue 


1,411 


Catherine Avenue 


from 


Anthony Avenue to Arlene Avenue 


1,000 


Cedar Street 


from 


Burt Road to Harris Street 


687 


Cedar Crest Road 


from 


Pinewood Road to Judith Road 


1,100 



62 



STREET 

Central Street 
chandler Road 
Jhapman Avenue 
charlotte Road 
;hase Road 
'hestnut Street 
;hurch Street 
:lark Street 
'ochrane Road 
Columbia Street 
Concord Street 
Congress Street 
"ook Avenue 
]oolidge Road 
;orey Avenue 
Cottage Street 
^rest Avenue 
]ross Street 
Cunningham Street 
ilypress Street 

)adant Drive 
)avis Road 
)ayton Road 
)ell Drive 
)obson Street 
)orchester Street 
)orothy Avenue 
)raper Drive 
)rury Lane 
)ublin Avenue 
)unton Road 

James Street 
Jdwards Road 
!lwood Road 
Cmerson Street 
Jnglewood Drive 
ivans Drive 

■■airfield Road 
^airmeadow Road 
'airmont Avenue 
'airview Avenue 
'aneuil Drive 
'aulkner Avenue 
'ay Street 
'ederal Street 
'erguson Road 
'letcher Lane 
'loradale Avenue 
ordham Road 
crest Street 
rederick Drive 

len Road 
lendale Circle 
ilenview Road 
owing Road 
race Drive 
rand Street 





T VNHTH 

J-lLjl^Vj i. LI 


DATE 


(s) ACCEPTED 






1950 






from Adflni<? 9fT"*^f»l" tn TCpI 1 pv T?npH 


400 


1957 






-L I. ciii nd 1- lid way ixL/au i.^ oiic i. J-UCili ixlicIU 




1 QSI 


1971 




f\m r^imH^T"Cf^n T?oaH t*i^ 1^0"\7nTiH Atm^iIi^ T^T"i"\7*i 

J- 1. Ullt Ijr LLLIUC i. o VJll rvL^ d U. L.\J UcVLfLlU. nJJL'i.J.L/ ULi-VXi 




1 Q71 

J.7 / J. 






i. L viii nd L.tidwct y iVL/du 


^ 7 / 


i7_) J 






J. i. Cm L> U L i. X.llg L-LflL fWcLlLlC L WdJLlLll ijJ.LlC 










J- L \JiU rid i. 11 L L cc u UU ri i. LlLl icocA. rive LiUC 


L 98'=; 


i. 7H 






from Main Street to Church Street 




1894 


1969 




from Forest Street to Wabash Road 


800 


1947 






i. L iJlll l^llLlLdl OLLccL L(J UcyULLU DcJ-UIdlL /WcLLLLc 


1 1 Sfl 


1 QnR 
i. 7U0 


1933 




r T" /Am TP £^ £^ 1^ ^ I Ct''Vdz:it" t~ W /^>~f~r^ TJdQ/lir^fy T iri^i 
X. L (Jilt rcUcLdJ- oLI-CcL L(J LNULLll xxcdU i-lL^ J-i 1. He 


D , OU J 


i. 07f 






frotn FoiTGSt StiTGGt to Binrlington LiriG 


'ill 


1939 






■f T* Ctm Main Qt"T"^ipt" 

1, L \Jm lld-Lli OUi-CCL. 


813 


1946 






i~ y~ om T-f a t* Vi aT.ia \7 Rr^aH 
i. i- v^Lii nd L-iidWd y ixCdU 


270 


i 7 4. 






J. JL V^Lll ILd J- 0^i-ee(_ \—\J \J 1. d LlVii O i. C e L. 


366 


1951 






■p T om Main ^f"TPPl" 

J- i. WLII i id 1.L1 O <- i- CC l- 


927 


1954 






J~ I. WlLl Ay CUI-C OUl^CCL. 


558 


1 947 

J. 7'-r / 






■f "mm Mann Qt'ffiAf" tr* T 11 ^ t" Tf^ a t* 


697 


1894 






"Ffom ^pIptti ^1"TPPt" t n R<=»pr'Vn' no" Avptiiip 

J- J. will lJ d J-dll tJ(-l-eei— L w UCC^ll-i. O V e 1 lUe 


2,447 


1944 


1953 


1952 


from Glen Road 


'26O 


1951 






frnm Mnrt"h *^frppf ^n Norfh *^^r^ip^ 


1 ,760 


1964 






J. 1. will L lex ^11 lJI-1>CCL. 


500 


1952 






■pTom Ha t^Vi aua V R naH 
±. i. dii ndt-iidwdy i\udu 


170 


1951 






J. 1. UUl ID U i. J.Xll^Ldl /WCllUC 


1 ,794 


1958 


1971 




nltf»n Rr^arl t'r\ h<s\7A'nH fZayt^f^Ty AiJ^nTiP 

JL J. Lflll uJ-Cll JAUdLl Lfcy dlU Od-l-uCll nVCLl LlC 


1 402 


1954 






from Billerica Line 


l!214 


1951 






from Arlene Avenue to Barbara Avenue 


1,490 


1960 






J. L wilt ^ L111U.C L O (Jll rVOdU L (J Ei V dllo JJI. J.V C 




i. 7 7 


1971 




L L (Jul O J-t-ll IVUdU. LU OCIIL/U J. O L L CC L 


J J 


i70 J 






J. I. (JLLl Lldi.ll OLi-CCL 


500 


1 QS1 

X 7 X 






J. I. Ulll INdoodLl fWcll U.C 


649 


X 7_^U 






LLKJUl rldin oLLCCL LU WOOUlII oLtccL 




1 7H 






r T" i^TTt Tn'iTffiot" C i~ y ^ ^ i~ t~ r^^"\Ti^n/l RqIW t.t n n R q /n 

jL l (Jilt ruicoL oLiccu HJ ucytj iiu. DdJ-U.wj.ii is.udu. 


450 


1 QA7 

X 7H- / 






L L l_ml rULtlaL oLLccL 


642 


X 7 U 






J_ I- Ullt r d 11 J. IV lie L /\Vc LlLlc L-U WdlVw^JUU. X\L/dU 




X7 JX 






L L kjUx IIWUUU U L J. V C 


4SS 


1 Q71 

X 7 / X 






I, L Um U Ulltl c X. o (Jll t\UdU. Lw U L cL\Jxz L JJlJ-Vc 


7 n? 1 


1 Q71 

X 7 / X 






trom Main S treet 


1 9QQ 


X 74-Q 






from Nichols Street to Nichols Street 


2,328 


1958 






from Malloy Road 


952 


1971 






rrom otate otree t 


vJ*+0 


J. 7 J J 






from Massachusetts Avenue to beyond Hax*vard Avenue 


/ 7U 








rrom uien Koaci to jacoob oLrecL 


J. , 7^D 




X 7 _J J 




from G len Road to Garden Avenue 


71i. 
/ It 


i7 JO 


1945 




i. L Um rlJ.U.ULcocA. r\Vc tlUc LU W*-»L/UL11 ol-l-CCL 


S 74f) 


J. 7*4" 






■prnm ^haxj<ihpf*n Avpniip 

J. J. will W i id W >i3 I-l Ll CW^LL't^^ 


1,073 


1967 






from Kilmarnock Street to Morgan Road 


792 


1977 






from Burlington Avenue 


627 


1970 






from North Reading Line 


3,714 


1971 






from Burlington Avenue to Aldrich Road 


4,100 


1894 


1976 




from Salem Street 


1,070 


1966 






from Middlesex Avenue to Main Street 


6,870 


1894 






from Glen Road to Lawrence Street 


1,304 


1952 






from Suncrest Avenue 


365 


1959 






from Park Street to Marcus Road 


941 


1956 






from Shawsheen Avenue to beyond Melody Lane 


2,514 


1966 






from Corey Avenue 


815 


1952 







63 



STREET 



LOCATION 



Grant Street from 

Grove Avenue from 

Grove Street from 

Gunderson Road from 

Hamlin Lane from 

Hanson Road from 

Hardin Street from 

Harnden Street from 

Harold Avenue from 

Harris Street from 

Harvard Avenue from 

Hathaway Road from 

Hawthorne Road from 

High Street from 

Hillside Way from 

Hilltop Road from 

Hobson Avenue from 

Hopkins Street from 

Industrial Way from 

Jaquith Road from 

Jere Road from 

Jones Avenue from 

Judith Road from 



Federal Street 

Main Street to Lake Street 

Reading Line 

Marie Drive to beyond Evans Drive 

Lawrence Street 
Woodland Road 

Aldrich Road to Jaquith Road 
Main Street to Glen Road 
Shawsheen Avenue to Reed Street 
Burlington Avenue to Cedar Street 
Main Street to River Street 
Woburn Street to Evans Drive 

Woburn Street 

Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 
Chestnut Street to Burlington Line 
Suncrest Avenue 

Pine Avenue to beyond Wisser Street 
Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 
Woburn Street to West Street 

Shawsheen Avenue 

Fairmeadow Road to Fairmeadow Road 
Glen Road 

Cedar Crest Road to Birchwood Road 



Kelley Road 
Kendall Street 
Kenwood Avenue 
Kiernan Avenue 
Kilmarnock Street 
King Street 
Kirk Street 



from Chandler Road 

from Aldrich Road to Blanchard Road 

from Woburn Street to beyond Englewood Drive 

from Lowell Street to beyond Naples Road 

from West Street to beyond Morgan Road 

from Glen Road to Broad Street 

from Main Street 



Lake Street from 

Lang Street from 

Laurel Avenue from 

Lawrence Court from 

Lawrence Street from 

Ledgewood Road from 

Lexington Street from 

Liberty Street from 

Lincoln Street from 

Linda Road from 

Lloyd Road from 

Lockwood Road from 

Longview Road from 

Loumac Road from 

Lowell Street from 

Lowell Street Park from 



Main Street to Shawsheen Avenue 

Bancroft Street 

Parker Street to Molloy Road 

Lawrence Street 

Glen Road to Shady Lane Drive 

Suncrest Avenue 

Cunningham Street to Mornings ide Drive 
Federal Street 
Federal Street 

High Street to beyond Pineridge Road 
Main Street 
Ballardvale Street 
Middlesex Avenue 
Drury Lane 

Main Street to Reading Line 
Lowell Street 



Mackey Road 


from 


Federal Street 


Magazine Road 


from 


Wisser Street 


Magazine Street 


from 


Tap 1 in Avenue 


Main Street 


from 


Tewksbury Line to Woburn Line 


Marcia Road 


from 


North Street to beyond Carolyn Road 


Marcus Road 


from 


Cowing Road 


Marie Drive 


from 


Woburn Street to beyond Gunderson Road 


Marion Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to beyond Clifton Street 


Marjorie Road 


from 


Main Street 



64 



STREET 




LOCATION 


LENGTH 


DATE 


(s) ACCEPTED 


assachusetts Avenue 


from 


Main Street to beyond Brattle Street 


810 


1945 




cDonald Road 


from 


Salem Street 


2,621 


1944 




eadow Lane 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


364 


1957 




elody Lane 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Grace Drive 


245 


1966 




iddlesex Avenue 


from 


Main Street to Salem Street 


12,140 


1894 




iles Street 


from 


Main Street to Hobson Avenue 


380 


1945 




iller Road 


from 


Glen Road 


638 


1945 




oofe Street 


from 




1 S?8 


J. 7u / 




organ Road 


from 


Kilmarnock Street 


653 


1977 




orningside Drive 


from 


Lexington Street to Fairfield Road 


693 


1974 




orse Avenue 


from 


Woburn Street to beyond Lawn Street 


1,360 


1939 




ystlc Avenue 


from 


Middlesex Avenue 


598 


1908 






from 




1 , JDO 






athan Road 


from 


Senpek Road 


1,057 


1971 




ichols Street 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 


3,801 


1894 




ickerson Avenue 


from 


West Street 


953 


1947 




orfolk Avenue 


from 


Carter Lane to Nassau Avenue 


537 


1954 




orth Street 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Marcia Road 


3,515 


1945 




unn Road 


from 


Kelley Road 


214 


1965 




ak Street 


from 


Salem Street 


355 


1951 




akdale Road 


from 


Short Street to Judith Road 


2,301 


1950 




akridge Circle 


from 


Gowing Road to Cowing Road 


1,730 


1958 




akwood Road 


from 


Main Street to beyond Emerson Street 


800 


1946 




Ison Street 


from 


Church Street 


122 


1957 




ark Street 


from 


Woburn Street to North Reading Line 


4,180 


1894 




aiiver ot-reet 


from 




^ , yjyjyj 


Lyu / 


1010 


atricia Circle 


from 


Dell Drive 


595 


1958 




ershing Street 


from 


Federal Street 


720 


1943 




hillips Avenue 


from 


Wild Avenue to beyond Baker Street 


1,519 


1946 


1954 


illing Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


954 


1959 




ine Avenue 


from 


Main Street to Hobson Avenue 


380 


1945 




ineridge Road 


from 


North Street to Linda Road 


914 


1960 




ineview Road 


from 


Cobalt Street to Adelman Road 


450 


1953 




inewood Road 


from 


Shady Lane Drive to Oakdale Road 


1,364 


1954 




leas ant Road 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Linda Road 


750 


1962 




owder House Circle 


from 


Middlesex Avenue 


710 


1954 




residential Drive 


from 


Boutwell Street 


826 


1977 




rogress Way 


from 


Industrial Way 


630 


1974 




^dclif f Road 


from 






1 Q71 




ailroad Avenue 


from 


Clark Street 


650 


1909 




adwood Terrace 


from 


Kenwood Avenue 


645 


1970 




aed Street 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to beyond Harold Avenue 


1,090 


1971 




Lchmond Street 


from 


Main Street to Shawsheen Avenue 


1,800 


1973 




idge Road 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


365 


1956 




ing Avenue 


from 


Salem Street to Biggar Avenue 


1,150 


1975 




Lver Street 


from 


Massachusetts Avenue to Harvard Avenue 


453 


1962 




oberts Road 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Burlington Avenue 


1,861 


1967 




3llins Road 


from 


Marion Street to Fenway Street 


200 


1954 




)osevelt Road 


from 


Boutwell Street to Swain Road 


1,980 


1946 




)ute 62 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Salem Street 


3,343 


1958 




)yal Street 


from 


Salem Street 


1,043 


1951 




ilem Street 


from 


Tewksbury Line to beyond Ballardvale Street 


8,895 


1894 




ilem Street 


from 


North Reading line to beyond Woburn Street 


6,475 


1894 




•altrito Drive 


from 


Salem Street 


785 


1974 




:hool Street 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to beyond Drury Lane 


1,139 


1915 


1963 


:npek Road 


from 


Wildwood Street to Nathan Road 


280 


1971 





65 



STREET 




LOCATION 


LENGTH 


DATE 




from 


Hathaway Road 


300 


1955 


shady Lane Drive 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Lawrence Street 


2,904 


1950 


Shawsheen Avenue 


from 


beyond Richard Street to Billerica Line 


11,845 


1894 


Sherburn Place 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


723 


1975 


Sheridan Road 


from 


Woburn Street to Hathaway Road 


1,021 


1951 


Sherwood Road 


from 


Forest Street to Cochrane Road 


445 


1971 


Silver Lake Avenue 


from 


Lake Street to Dexter Street 


455 


1954 


Sprucewood Road 


from 


Shady Lane Drive 


690 


1952 


State Street 


from 


Belmont Avenue to Fairview Avenue 


315 


1933 


S trout Avenue 


from 


Lowell Street 


908 


1955 


Suncrest Avenue 


from 


West Street to Ledgewood Road 


1,246 


1954 


Quii 1 n RoaH 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Forest Street 


2,290 


1922 


Taft Road 


from 


Boutwell Street to Swain Road 


1,986 


1938 


Tpnl in Avpnup 


from 


Wisser Street 


461 


1946 


Tap 1 in Avenue 


from 


Baker Street 


900 


1946 


Temple Street 


from 


Church Street 


214 


1911 


Thrush Road 


from 


Salem Street to Marie Drive 


400 


1961 


Thurston Avenue 


from 


Church Street to beyond Kidder Place 


623 


1907 


Truman Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


300 


1953 


Unnamed Street 


from 


Salem Street to Andover Street 


470 


1958 


Upton Court 


from 


Andover Street 


500 


1894 


Veranda Avenue 


from 


Main Street 


847 


1916 


Virginia Road 


from 


North Reading Line to North Reading Line 


1,105 


1954 


Walker Street 


from 


Main Street 


423 


1958 


Warren Road 


from 


Wightman Road to Tewksbury Line 


97 


1954 


Washington Avenue 


from 


Clark Street to Stone Street 


1,650 


1920 


Webber Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue 


677 


1969 


Wedgewood Avenue 


from 


Moore Street 


476 


1967 


West Street 


from 


Woburn Street to Reading Line 


8,372 


1894 


Westdale Avenue 


from 


West Street 


1,211 


1942 


Wicks Circle 


from 


Everett Avenue 


533 


1971 


Wightman Road 


from 


Warren Road to Tewksbury Line 


239 


1954 


Wild Avenue 


from 


Grove Avenue 


1,050 


1910 


Wildwood Street 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 


5,920 


1894 


Williams Avenue 


from 


Main Street 


706 


1940 


Wilson Street 


from 


Federal Street 


760 


1943 


Wilton Drive 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


1,151 


1966 


Winchell Road 


from 


Grove Avenue to Burnap Street 


193 


1945 


Wing Road 


from 


Woburn Street 


746 


1958 


Wisser Street 


from 


Main Street to Brand Avenue 


1,146 


1950 


Woburn Street 


from 


Andover Street to Woburn Line 


23,122 


1894 


Woodland Road 


from 


Lowell Street 


1,174 


1969 



66 



Carter Lecture Fund 



A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE CARTER LECTURE FUND: 



The donor, Mrs. Sarah Davis (Jaquith) Carter, was born in Wilmington in 1832. In 1874 she married Cyrus Lewis 
Carter, and died in Wilmington in 1907. 

In her will, Mrs. Carter bequeathed to the Town of Wilmington the sum of Six thousand dollars, in trust to in- 
vest the principal sum to expend the income in maintaining courses of lectures for the benefit of the people 
of Wilmington. 

Town Meeting March 1, 1909 : The town unanimously voted to accept the legacy of Mrs. Carter, and that the same 
be placed in the hands of the Board of Trustees of Trust Funds for investments, and the income derived there- 
from be paid annually to a committee consisting of five members. 

We hope you will take advantage of these free programs planned for you. 

******** 

On Thursday evening, April 14, 1977, the committee presented Mr. John Roberts - "A NEW NORWAY". Mr. Roberts 
was well received by an enthusiastic audience. The School Department made it possible for the High School 
students to see Mr. Roberts' program the morning of April 15th. 

The 1978 program - "SCOTLAND", a new film by William G. V. Sylvester will be presented on Thursday evening, 
April 13 at 8:15 in the Herbert C. Barrows Auditoriim, Wilmington High School. 

THE WESTERN ISLES .. .wonderful lands of tranquility. 

SHETLAND ... the Viking tradition, young Vikings. 

THE NORTH SEA. . .and its oil. Thrilling technical marvel, sea of brutal storms and calm moods. 
WILDLIFE ... Red deer, baby foxes, wildcats, reindeer. 

HIGHLAND GAMES .. .Piper Bands, unbelieveable "Heavies" Hill Race, fun at Duncon and Ft. William. 

LIVING AND EATING IN SCOTLAND. .. "B&B" , Inns, luxurious Hotels, Castles, inexpensive Pub Lunch and 

High Tea. Burns Tradition. 

LOCHS, COUNTRYSIDE, CITIES ... from the Borders to the North, West to East, Loch Lomond, Loch Ness, 

River Ness, Inverness to Glasgow. 

The School Department will present Mr. Sylvester's program to the High School students the following morning. 



67 



Council on Aging 



Many new programs and social services have been implemented for the Wilmington Senior Citizens during the yei 
of 1977. 

The Council on Aging, comprised of an eleven member board, and its Coordinator, Pat Nee Bradbury, operate ' 
senior programs and maintain the Senior Drop-In Center. This center has been donated by Mr. Mike DeMoulas c 
DeMoulas Supermarkets, and is utilized by approximately twelve hundred seniors a month. The Senior Citizen 
mini-bus, staffed by two part-time drivers, is operated out of the Center. The bus is used by seniors for 
medical appointments, transportation to Hot Lunch Program, to and from the Drop-In Center and various other 
appointments. Four to five hundred seniors use this service per month. 

The Senior Hot-Lunch Program has been in operation for a full year and has proven a great success. Seniors j 
are served meals at the North Intermediate School during the entire school year. The dedicated staff of the 
school has worked hard to provide nutritious meals and special surprises for the seniors. Senior shut-ins 
may have their meals delivered to their homes on school days. During the summer months the meals were pre- 
pared by the staff of the Woburn Street School for the shut-ins alone. The program is run through the Senic 
Center in cooperation with the School Department, each month it services at least five hundred seniors at th 
North Intermediate and six hundred deliveries to senior shut-ins. 

A regular schedule of activities is available to Wilmington's Seniors. They have included swimming at the 
Shawsheen Valley Technical High School, Whist and Card parties, organized bowling, dance lessons, arts and 
crafts, socialization, and walking programs. A film program was developed with the cooperation of the Wilmi 
ton Public Library, films are shown to seniors on a bi-monthly basis at the Library. A weekly blood pressur 
clinic is also held at the Drop-In which services at least 70 seniors a month. Nurses are provided for this 
service without charge through the cooperation of the Wilmington Board of Health. During the course of the 
year. Seniors also attended many lectures and discussions held by guest speakers at the Drop-In Center. 

Recreational activities for the year included bus trips to the Science Museum, Boston Flower Show, Chateau d 
Ville, North Shore Music Theatre, Boston Harbor Cruise, Fall Foliage ride. Red Sox game. Senior Day at Sails 
bury Beach, Dinner Theatre with the Spotlighters providing free entertainment. Sweetheart Ball, Halloween ar 
Christmas parties. The seniors also enjoyed many other parties and dinners provided for them by local clubs 
and organizations. 

Senior volunteer effort has also rated very highly this year with participation in phone answering services, 
drivers for replacement of mini-bus services, visiting association, Dial-A-Friend , tutoring students at the 
North Intermediate School, making special gifts for Senior Shut-ins, Sunshine Lady and host and hostesses fc 
the Drop-In' s coffee canteen. 

We have also been serviced by the Minute Man Home Care Corporation which provides chore and homemaker servic 
legal services, a meal site in Burlington, and information and referral services. A member of our Council, 
Mrs. Nema Miller sits on the Board of Directors with Mr. Ed MacDonald as the alternate member. Annual dues 
to this Corporation are paid by the Council on Aging. A new staff member to the Council on Aging assisting 
us twenty hours a week and federally funded through the Senior Aides Program has been provided through the 
efforts of this agency. 

Social Programs for the seniors have included counseling with the Wilmington Family Counseling Service and 
Mystic Valley Mental Health. A probation program worked through the Woburn District Court and our Coordinat 
provided free labor to Wilmington's seniors for a total of one hundred hours of work. The Friendly Visiting 
Association, which consists of members of the community as well as our seniors, visit those who are unable 
to get out. Shut-in referrals come from the Board of Health Nurses, other seniors and community people. 
There is also a new program called "Dial-A-Friend" whereby volunteers make daily phone calls to check on 
seniors living alone. These programs have grown throughout the year and have helped the Council on Aging 
reach new seniors who are shut-in their homes. 

The Council on Aging was a participant in Student Government Day this year. Two High School girls sat on ti 



68 



ouncil for a meeting, attended senior activities, visited a senior shut-in and had a tour of the Department 
f Elder Affairs in Boston. It was an enjoyable and learing experience for the girls and our seniors. 

year of giving from the young people of our community has been appreciated by Wilmington's Seniors. Elemen- 
ary to High School students have all shown a caring attitude as well as the businesses, clubs and adult 
rganizations of the town. It has been a year of growing and giving and our special thanks is extended to all 
ho have helped us and to the townspeople who have appropriated the budget which has made possible the Council 
n Aging's success. 




Seniors enjoying Council-sponsored party 



Beautification Committee 



le Beautification Committee has been involved in the study of Various submitted preliminary plans for the 
iwn Common. In the spring, we will present the plan we feel is most condusive to the activity within the 
lea. 

1 were pleased to add Christmas lights to the display at Rotary Park, as well as on the gazebo on the Town 
Inanon. 

ns Committee regretfully accepted the resignation of Hilda Nelson. Her extensive knowledge about planting 
be greatly missed. 

^ welcomed Hugh Wiberg and Joseph Cuoco as new members. 



69 



School Committee 



The School Committee of the Town of Wilmington herewith presents its report for the year 1977. The present 
membership of the Committee is as follows: 

Linda T. McMenimen, Chairperson 
Lester E. White, Vice Chairperson 
John D. Brooks, Secretary 
James A. Demos 
Francis A. Ottati 
James D. Tighe 

Wilmington opened its school doors this year on September 7, 1977, with a total enrollment of 4897 students. 
This figure is down 155 from last year's official enrollment of 5052. 

HIGH SCHOOL RENOVATION 

The School Committee decided to embark on an internal renovation and conversion project at Wilmington High 
School during 1976. The purpose of the program was to update obsolete and archaic instructional facilities , 
and equipment, as well as to provide additional instructional space through converting some non-instructiona 
areas into instructional sites. 

Phase I was initiated and completed in 1976. During the second phase, which was completed this past year, 
$65,325 was spent to create an additional teaching station for Physical Education, major equipment replacem 
for Occupational and Career Education, shelving and storage facilities, and some specialized equipment for o 
science laboratories. Another major portion of this project involved the replacement of at least half of ou 
old auditorium seating with new chairs. The remaining seats are scheduled for replacement during a future 
phase. 

ACCREDITATION I 

The School Department has recently received word from the New England Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools that Wilmington High School has had its accreditation continued through June, 1980. The progress ma 
during the aforementioned renovation is undoubtedly a contributing factor in this continuance. 

STAFF RECRUITMENT 

As in the four previous years, the number of qualified teachers applying for jobs greatly exceeded the limit 
number of positions available. The school administration received over 1,000 inquiries and applications fro 
certified teaching personnel. A significant number of these inquiries were received from out of state 
universities. 

PROJECTED ENROLLMENTS 

During the Fall of 1977, the Superintendent of Schools did a complete analysis of the actual and projected 
school enrollments for our system. The past period covered was 1970-1976. The period covered in the projec" 
tions is 1978 through 1982. As expected, the analysis documented a decline in the number of students that vLl 
be attending our schools through the next half decade. A chart showing the projections is included in this 
report. It can readily be seen that the School Committee will be facing some important staffing and budget:; 
decisions related to these enrollment figures. One of the most difficult decisions will be to determine th« 
feasibility of continuing to keep all of our existing schools open. 



70 



RESIGNATIONS AND RETIREMENTS 



quests for leaves of absence, resignations, and retirements were granted to thirty (30) teachers for the 
llowlng reasons: 

Leaves of Absence: 17 Resignations: 13 



Sabbatical Leave (Semester) 





Retirement 


1 


Maternity Leave 


12 


Teach in Other Communities 


2 


Graduate Study 


1 


Continue Education 





Temporary Relocation 


3 


Family Responsibility 


2 


Family Responsibilities 


1 


Career Change 


4 






Reduction in Force 


1 






Counseled Out 


3 



tirements 

e School Committee wishes to acknowledge the retirement of Mr. Ralph T. Ambrose who served our community with 
stinction as a teacher and administrator for thirty years. Mr. Ambrose was appointed Supervising Principal 
the Wildwood Elementary School in 1954, and of the Central District, involving the Buzzell, Swain, Walker, 
d Whltefield Elementary Schools, in 1966. A distinguished educator, Mr. Ambrose demonstrated a paramount 
imnitment to the physical safety, spiritual well-being and educational development of the children entrusted 
I his care. He was active in the profession as a member of the Massachusetts Association of Elementary Schoo] 
jincipals. His warm, compassionate nature and dedication to quality education is greatly appreciated by all 
'o worked with him. The Committee wishes to take this opportunity to extend its sincere appreciation to 
;. Ambrose for his dedicated service to the youth of Wilmington, and wishes him a happy and healthy retirement. 

3 Wilmington Public Schools were in operation 180 days beginning September 8, 1976, and ending June 30, 1977. 
? Committee held twenty-two (22) regular meetings, six (6) special meetings, fourteen (14) meetings relative 
j collective bargaining, one (1) public budget meeting for a total of forty-three (43) meetings for the year 
?7. 

i Committee is grateful to the Town Officials, other Town Departments, and to the citizens of Wilmington for 
feir excellent cooperation and assistance during the past year. 




Ralph Ambrose Retired This Year 



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72 



Superintendent of Schools 



I am pleased to submit the Annual Report of the activities of the Wilmington Public Schools for the year 1977. 

The problem with developing such a report is that the writer is in danger of neglecting to mention some signif- 
icant facet of a year's work, or some outstanding event which demonstrates an important contribution of a 
dedicated individual. 

Nevertheless, I will attempt to highlight some of the events and activities that addressed improvement in our 
various school programs. 

WILMINGTON HIGH SCHOOL 

Achievement Award Night - The achievements of our students are varied. Some are outstanding in their academic 
work, while others are outstanding in their extra-curricula activities. Close to seventy-five students were 
noted by their teachers as being outstanding in some capacity and were recognized at a special candlelight 
ceremony in June. 

School Attendance - Attendance in school and in class continues to be receiving a great deal of our attention. 
The tightening up of our attendance procedures has resulted in a marked decline in classroom absences while 
maintaining our school attendance of nearly 95%. 

Elective Program - Mindful of the criticism by some that schools have become too easy, the elective program 
was scrutinized in light of the diverse student population at the high school. As a result of this examina- 
tion, some courses with low enrollment were not offered again this year. 

Advanced Placement Program - The Advanced Placement Program continues to be offered at Wilmington High School. 
It is a cooperative educational endeavor between the high school and the College Entrance Examination Board. 
Many young people can, with profit, complete college-level studies in their secondary schools. We offer two 
A. P. P. courses: United States History and European History. 



Foreign Language Department - The pioneers of our totally elective Junior High Foreign Language Program are 
now seniors. Because of their interest and ability in foreign languages, we have added Spanish V to the 
curriculum. Twenty-three students are enrolled in Spanish V. We also have twenty-eight French V students, 
which is the largest number of French V students we have ever had. Thus, between our Spanish V and French V 
students, we have fifty-one seniors enrolled in a fifth year foreign language course. This means that five 
times more seniors are taking a fifth year language course than ever before. We are very proud of the inter- 
est and achievement of these students in foreign languages, and of their teachers. 

In May we inducted thrity-seven of our top Spanish students into the Spanish Honor Society, and twenty-three 
of our top French students into the French Honor Society. These two societies have existed for several years. 
However, in May we began a German Honor Society in order to recognize our top German students. Mrs. Lewis, 
who is our German teacher, was most instrumental in establishing the German Honor Society. James Nee, one 
of our inductees into the German Honor Society, scored in the 98th oercentile in a contest of German students. 
The advisors of all three honor societies are most enthusiastic and try to arrange a variety of activities for 
the students throughout the year. More than eighty of these students recently attended a Foreign Language 
Career Day at Boston College. 



G raduation Requirements - To raise the standards at our school, the minimum requirements for a high school 
diploma were increased. Students who graduate from our school will have to pass four years of Physical 'educa- 
tion, as well as one year of Mathematics, Science, and U. S. History. In addition, students will have to have 
earned 100 credits. 

73 



Guidance Services - A Group Guidance Program for Grade 9 was developed this past year. The purpose of the 
program Is to better orient the students to the diverse opportunities at the school and to make the transltl 
from 8th to 9th grade easier. A course developed by our guidance staff entitled Job Talk is designed to hel 
students learn about the qualifications for the thousands of jobs that are performed in today's complex worl 

High School Library - This year the high school library has a new look. The addition of green carpeting and 
walls, orange chairs, and teakwood table tops and shelving have made it more cheerful. The acquisition of 
new tables, study and AV carrels, bulletin boards, magazine and paper racks, and shelving have improved spac 
utilization. We have set aside a tiny room for reference and quiet study. Federal funds provided color and 
black and white VTR taping capabilities so that we can record educational programs and show them in the li- 
brary or in classrooms. With the additional help provided by a full-time CETA person and a student on a you 
employment program, we are providing more professional service to the teachers and students. 

National Merit Semi-finalist - Patrick J. Leonard was selected as a semi-finalist in the National Merit Corp 
ration, while three other students, Kurt Mueller, Scott Lane, and Andrew Blum were commended. These fine 
students and the others participating in our Advance Placement Program are a source of pride to the school £ 
well as to their parents. Students will be recognized for their academic achievement by our newly formed 
Honor Roll. 

Safety - Of paramount importance Is the safety of our students and staff. New signs were installed In our 
front driveway noting the Fire Lane and marking exit and entrance. In addition, speed bumps were installed 
in the side parking lot to slow vehicles. To help protect students' belongings, the practice of changing 
locker combinations annually is being continued. 

Scheduling - Our high school's schedule is very complex. Not only must we schedule over 1350 students into 
612 sections of 206 courses, we must also be mindful that our 85 teachers have a contract that governs theii 
working conditions. Paramount in scheduling is that we attempt to arrange our courses around what combinat: 
our students want. 

Student Activities - The after-school activity program continues to meet the needs of those students who an 
not sports oriented. Activities range from Interscholastic competition in mathematics and chess to drama 
and hiking. The Senior Class of the high school continued the tradition of sponsoring a town-wide blood- 
mobile. Over 240 pints of blood were donated in the name of the Town of Wilmington. In addition, the clas> 
sponsored the construction of a gazebo on the Town Common. Under the leadership of senior David McMillan, 
townspeople, business, faculty and students donated supplies, energy, and time In building a lasting classi 
gift to the Town of Wilmington. 

Work Study - Work study is an alternative educational program! It has been a solution to the educational 
problems of many students who otherwise would be forced to leave school due to a host of problems. Because 
of the versatility of the program, these students are able to earn a high school diploma as well as prepare 
themselves for earning a profitable living. Many of these students will not be going on to further educati 
but will be able to work full-time in skilled occupations. At present, there are 65 students in the progra 
consisting of 24 seniors, 19 juniors, 14 sophomores, and 8 freshmen gaining experience and skills in the 
world of work. The major portion of these students will be going Into full-time employment with the compa 
in which they are now employed. It is estimated that the salary of work-study students will be $155,500 fo 
the 1977-1978 school year. 

CAREER AND OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION 

Career education consists of all those activities and experiences through which one learns about work. As 
such, it makes no restrictions in meaning whether one speaks about the work of the homemaker, the musician, 
the lawyer, or the bricklayer. Some work will require advanced college degrees while other work may Includ 
no formal schooling of any kind. Some work will be In the form of primary work roles, paid or unpaid, whl] 
other work will be carried out as part of one's leisure time. To the extent that work is judged "successfi ' 
it does typically — and, in these times. Increasingly — require some learned set of vocational skills. 

The introduction of a job placement center at the High School is one of our main accomplishments this year. 
In cooperation with the Massachusetts Division of Employment Security, the Wilmington Public Schools has be i 
able to establish a Job Center In the Career and Occupation Education Department staffed by Mrs. Donna Jenlis 
In an effort to help those seeking part-time and full-time employment, Mrs. Jenkins is interviewing and relr- 
rlng students, as well as high school dropouts who are seeking job opportunities. At the present time the Jb 
placement center has Interviewed approximately 254 students for jobs and has placed many of these students a 
jobs. Also, this office is set up to aid those who need Social Security Cards and has obtained 33 as of t\s 
date. 

74 

I 

i 



I 



ENGLISH-LANGUAGE ARTS 

iandwriting Instruction - The adopted program for teaching handwriting has been expanded to the first four 
grades. Manuscript writing is taught in grades 1 and 2. Grade 3 is a transition year to cursive writing, 
rhe program will add an additional grade level each year until all six grade levels are included. 

Citle III at North Intermediate - The English Department at the North was awarded a Title III grant for devel- 
jping an individualized reading program that emphasizes visual and aural processes. A pre- and post-assessment 
is being performed to determine the effect of the program upon the students' attitudes toward reading. 

i'oet-In-Residence at West Intermediate - The Mass. Arts and Humanities Foundation awarded a grant to the 
5nglish Department to participate in the Poet-in-Residence Program. In the spring, Mr. Gary Miranda, a pub- 
lished poet and experienced teacher, will work with the students in the English classes in a ten-day poetry 
rorkshop. The purpose of the program is to interest students in reading and writing poetry through direct 
;ontact with a professional writer. 

College Prep Courses at High School - In the past two years, there has been a dramatic increase in the number 
if students who select college preparatory electives. In 1973-74, only 25% of our juniors and seniors were 
jnrolled in these courses. By 1976-77, the number virtually doubled. In 1977-1978, 50% of the juniors and 
seniors selected one or more of the following electives: Advanced Grammar and Usage, Logic and Semantics, 
Writing Workshop, American Themes, Satire and Comedy, Shakespeare, and College Skills. 

PUPIL PERSONNEL SERVICES 

Je have been successful working with SHARE, in obtaining the services of their psychiatrist, Dr. Jerry 

largolis, to provide in-service training for our counselors. Thus far, he has discussed with us some problems 

ind solutions in dealing with alcoholism, children in broken homes, suicidal teens and general problems of 

iidolescence. We are currently engaged iii working on case studies. Last spring, we adopted a program for 

jiigh school seniors without plans beyond graduation. 
I 

everal of our counselors have participated in evening sessions of the alcohol workshop and two of them also 
articipated in the Boston University and General Electric vocational training program. 

READING 

eading Specialists are in every elementary school classroom two days a week for 45 minutes a day. Reading 
pecialists team with the classroom teachers and work with all children during the course of the school year, 
n this way Reading Specialists help teachers to individualize instruction and provide an effective Reading 
rogram for every child in the classroom. 

est Intermediate Reading Skills Program - Several content area teachers at the West Intermediate School are 
teaching reading skills as part of their everyday instruction. The planning of this pilot program started 
last fall and continued throughout the school year. Teachers met- after school hours to outline specific 
'eading goals and to develop a reading skills program that could be integrated into their daily teaching 

ractices . 

he Reading Department was awarded a Title III Grant of $7,499 to help support this program, 

increased enrollment in the Reading Field Service , an independent study in which high school students are 
'rained to tutor elementary school children in reading, has enabled the Reading Department to place high 
chool tutors at the Walker, Woburn Street, Swain, Wildwood, Shawsheen, and Glen Road Schools. 

n its fifth year of operation the Volunteer Reading Tutor Program has expanded its training program to pre- 
are parents to tutor children in Reading in grades 1-8. The training program which originally placed parents 
n grades 1-3 is a 20-hour program which includes classroom observation as a part of the instruction. Irene 
eaton, Donna Butt, Shirley Callan, Thomasina Carlson, Ruth Filipowicz and Norma Medieros are currently 
erving as V.R.T.'s. Mrs. Irene Beaton is the Community Coordinator for the program. 



75 




Title I PACS have been established at each Title I School. The Title I Chairpersons for this year are: 



Kay Smith 
Marie Woodland 
Louise Fuller 
Barbara Metcalfe 
Annette Shelley 
Marie Simone 
Arlene Potenza 



Boutwell 

Glen Road 

Shawsheen 

Shawsheen 

Swain 

Wildwood 

Woburn Street 



In addition, Mrs. Shelley and Mrs. Smith serve as chairpersons of the districtwide PAC. 

The Title I Reading Program received $81,466 in Federal Funds this year. 

Mini-Course for Parents - In order to promote awareness of the reading needs of middle-grade youngsters, thfi 
Reading Department has developed a five session mini-course for parents who have children in grades 4-8. 
Parents are learning how to combat the effects of television and provide a home environment conducive to 
effective growth in reading. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 

During the 1976-1977 school year, 130 students were referred for individual Core Evaluations, as provided fi 
in Chapter 766. The following graph indicates, by grade level, the number of referrals received. 



REFERRAL PATTERN FOR SPECIAL NEEDS STUDENTS 
1976-1977 School Year 




\e major goal of Chapter 766 is the mains treaming of special needs students into the regular education pro- 
ramming. The Special Education Department has worked closely with all schools and departments in an effort 
3 achieve this goal. The following two graphs indicate the reduction of special education service time and 
rogram classification for special needs students for the 1976-1977 school year. Also for this period 38.5% 
E the school system's over 600 special needs students were able to have their special education services re- 
iced, thus moving the youngsters closer to full regular education mainstreaming . 



*240 

200 

160 

120 

80 

40 




241 



50 

1 



MOVEMENT AMONG PROTOTYPES 



1976-1977 School Year 



20 



Prototype Reduction: 



502.1 
502.2 
502.3 
502.4 
502.5 
502.6 
502.9 



No Movement 
13 Students 
33 Students 
2 Students 
No Movement 
No Movement 
2 Students 



I I *Total Number of Reviews 

Number of Reviews Reduced by Prototype 



Number of Reviews Increased by Prototype 



*Annual Reviews - Plans Received by Special Education Office to Date 



77 



REDUCTION OF SERVICE TIME 



1976-1977 School Year 




TOTAL NUMBER OF STUDENTS REDUCED IN SERVICE HOURS 

AVERAGE MEAN REDUCTION 2.5 HRS. 

MEDIAN REDUCTION 2 HRS . 

Does Not Include 502.2 Students Receiving Speech and Language Therapy Only. 

The Special Education Department has taken advantage of the federal government's new Special Education Law, i 
P. L. 94-142, by obtaining federal grant monies in an effort to further upgrade the level of services to sp 
needs students. 



Specifically, a grant totalling $32,000 is currently operating within the school district. With this moneyfhe 
School Department has hired two additional speech pathologists and a part-time communication assistant. Wi i 
this additional personnel, Wilmington has been able to reduce the caseloads of speech pathologists from app»x 
mately 65 to 70 students to 35 to 40, thus providing far more intensive speech and language therapy in the 
school system. 

Wilmington's entitlement under P.L. 94-142 will increase substantially for the 1978-1979 school year. Estiiti 
entitlements should total over $64,000 and the Special Education Department will be writing federal proposaJ 
an effort to obtain these monies. 



78 



STATUS OF CLASS OF 1977 



Percent to four year non-state colleges and universities... 15.6 

Percent to four year state colleges and universities 15.9 

Percent to two year non-state colleges 2.6 

Percent to two year state colleges 9.4 

Percent to nursing schools 1.2 

Percent to other post high school education 1 . 

Percent to further education 45.7 

Percent to working forces 31.8 

Percent to military service 2.0 

Percent to marriage 1.3 

Percent that failed to respond to senior survey 19 . 2 

100.0% 



Lsted below are the colleges, universities, technical schools, and nursing schools to which our 1977 graduates 
ive indicated their intention to attend in the fall: 

)ur Year Colleges and Universities: 



lerican International College 

ma Maria College 

inhurst College 

sumption College 

bson College 

tes College 

ntley College 

thany College 

ston College 

ston University 

wdoin College 

andeis University 

cknell University 

lifornia College of Arts & Crafts 
se Western Reserve University 
Igate University 
rry College 
ckinson College 
manuel College 
irfield University 
irleigh Dickinson University 
anklin Pierce College 
brgia Institute of Technology 
brgetown University 
'Irdon College 
'jcher College 
'rvard University 
'ssachusetts College of Art 
''rlmack College 

htana School of Mineral Science & Technology 
•;son College 

Hampshire College 
■ theastern University 
ich University 
Dame College 
msylvania State University 



Quinnipiac College 

Regis College 

Ripon College 

Roger Williams College 

St. Anselm's College 

Salve Regina College 

Simmons College 

Southeastern Massachusetts University 

State College at Boston 

State College at Bridgewater 

State College at Fitchburg 

State College at Framingham 

State College at North Adams 

State College at Salem 

State College at Westfield 

State College at Worcester 

State University of New York & Albany 

State University of New York & Fredonia 

State University of New York & Old Westbury 

Stonehill College 

Suffolk University 

Syracuse University 

Trinity College 

Tufts University 

University of Bridgeport 

University of Lowell 

University of Massachusetts at Amherst 
University of Maine at Orono 
University of New Hampshire 
University of Notre Dame 
University of Miami 
University of Rhode Island 
Wentworth Institute 
Wheaton College 
Yankton College 



79 



Less Than Four Year Colleges: 



Bay State Junior College 

Boston University School of Graduate Dentistry 

Bunker Hill Community College 

Burdett College 

Colby-Sawyer College 

Endicott Junior College 

Ferrum Junior College 

Franklin Institute 

Katherine Gibbs School 

Lowell General Hospital School of Nursing 



Massachusetts Bay Community College 
Middlesex Community College 

Massachusetts General Hospital School of Nursing 

New England School of Photography 

Northeastern University Dental Assistant Program 

Northern Essex Community College 

North Shore Community College 

Peter Bent Brigham Hospital School of Nursing 

Springfield Tech. Community College 

Westbrook College 



In conclusion, I would like to take this opportunity to extend my appreciation to the School Committee, 
administrators, teachers, parents and students who contributed their efforts to the Wilmington Public Schools 
during the 1977 school year. A special note of thanks also is extended to the many town departments that 
cooperated with the school system during 1977. 



Revenue Sharing 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON 
DETAIL OF REVENUE SHARING _ 
JULY 1, 1976 to JUNE 30, 1977 



Federal Grants 



Balance on hand July 1, 1976 



Interest Received 
On Investments Expended 



Balance 
On Hand 

$53,882.45 Cash in Bank 

38,374.68 Encumbered B' B 
$92,257.13 



Received 7/1/76 through 6/30/77 $470,199.00 



$8,349.71 $563,074,42 



Balance on hand June 30, 1977 



$ 7,731.42 Cash in Bank 



Expenditures : 

Police Salaries 
Fire Salaries 
Blue Cross/Blue Shield 
and Group Life 



$185,988.22 
231,668.73 

145,417.47 
$563,074.42 



"I certify that this is a true extract 
of the Revenue Sharing Funds of the 
Town of Wilmington, Mass." 



Robert H. Peters 
Town Accountant 



80 



Community Schools Committee 



Community education is a concept which provides an opportunity for people to work together to achieve connnuni- 
ty and self-improvement. It offers learning and enrichment opportunities in education and recreation, cultural 
activities and social programs to citizens of all ages on a year-round basis, including evenings and weekends. 
It helps to coordinate existing services and offers opportunities for inter-agency cooperation. It is a move- 
ment which is nation-wide in scope, as the public, realizing that it has made a major investment in school 
buildings, begins to feel that these buildings should not be sitting idle more than 50% of the time I Approxi- 
mately forty-five communities in Massachusetts are now using their schools for some form of a Community Schools 
program. 

In the fall of 1976, the Board of Selectmen appointed a Community Schools Study Committee to look into the 
possibility of opening up the Wilmington schools for use by its citizens. 

After visiting several other programs in nearby communities, the committee realized that each community school 
program varies according to the needs and desires of their community. Therefore the first task was to take an 
inventory of the services and organizations which already exist in Wilmington. This was followed by a survey, 
sent to approximately 4500 households, to find out how Wilmington citizens felt about these services and life 
in the community in general. Over 900 responses were received in which people cited drug and alcohol abuse, 
lack of recreational activities (other than organized team sports) , lack of activities and places to go for 
adolescents, availability of health care and availability of educational and cultural opportunities as being 
major problems with which the town should be concerned. Many expressed surprise at the activities listed and 
requested further information about them. As a result of these requests, the committee plans to publish a 
brochure which would make available this information. 

Since our growing tax rate is a matter of concern to all of us, one of the problems the committee faced was 
to find a means of utilizing the schools in their off-hours and offering programs without adding an appreci- 
able increase to the town budget. As ways in which to operate were explored, it became apparent that if 
Community Schools were to be operated as a private, non-profit corporation, rather than as a Town Committee, 
it would be possible to raise independent funds outside the town budget and to also charge fees to users of 
the programs which would help to make them self-supporting, neither of which is possible as a Town Agency. 
A.11 Wilmington citizens interested in the aims of Community Schools would be eligible to be officers in the 
corporation or to be on its Board of Directors. 

As the main purpose of Community Schools is to involve and serve Wilmington citizens and make Wilmington a 
ibetter place to live, the committee feels that there needs to be some commitment from the town, and therefore 
a Warrant Article will be presented at the Annual Town Meeting to ask for a limited amount of funds to help 
underwrite the program and get it started. This would make Community Schools a "vendor of services" to the 
jtown (much like our existing services of Family Counseling and SHARE) , but would allow for independent oper- 
ation and fund raising. It is the committee's hope that the Wilmington taxpayers will agree that we cannot 
afford the waste that our idle schools now represents and will feel that at least some of them should be 
ased to their full potential, thus getting a more satisfactory return on our investment. 

jChe committee wishes to thank the School Department for its cooperation in helping us put out the survey, and 
wishes to thank Mr. Edward Sousa of the Data Processing Department, in particular, for his assistance in col- 
lating the results. The Cadet Girl Scouts and many High School students also assisted with the survey and 
itheir help was greatly appreciated. 



81 



Shawsheen Tech. School Committee 



Regular meetings of the Regional School Committee were held the second and fourth Tuesday of each month. 
Numerous additional special meetings were called by the Chairman as the need arose during this extremely 
active year. The time and place of all meetings are duly posted by the District Town Clerks at least forty- 
eight hours in advance. Unless otherwise noted, the meetings are held at the school facility located at 100 
Cook Street, Billerica. These meetings are open to the public and residents of the District are encouraged 
to attend. 



The elected representatives of the School Committee are: 



BEDFORD TEWKSBURY 
Anthony Mazzone Wilson E. Brazile 

Joseph Rogers, Chairman Richard E. Griffin 

BURLINGTON 

John G. Murphy WILMINGTON 

Lawrence Flaherty 

BILLERICA Frank McLean 

Kenneth L. Buffum, Secretary- 
Treasurer 
Paul Heffernan 



At an Organizational Meeting held in April 1977, Wallace B. Haigh was elected Chairman, Joseph L. Roger, V±ci 
Chairman and Kenneth L. Buffum, Secretary-Treasurer. Several changes took place during the past few months 
as resignations were forthcoming from Eugene L. Kritter, Wilmington and Wallace B. Haigh, Burlington. Josepl 
L. Rogers filled the position as Chairman. 

During January the budget was the main item of discussion. Representatives from the finance committees of t' 
five towns were present at meetings and voiced their opinion on various items of the budget which was finali 
zed on January 10, 1977. 

The following subcommittees were operational during the year: Negotiations, Personnel, Technical Advisory, 
Management Organizational Review, Data Processing, Curriculum. , 

John McDermott was appointed to the position of Area Coordinator for Career Education and Occupational Skilll 
We anticipate that Mr. McDermott will work closely with the school officials from the five towns to develop 
skill training within their own facilities, particularly for those students who do not plan to go on to col- 
lege after graduation. 

During the sunmier of 1977 an easement was granted to the Billerica Sewer Commission for the installation of 
a sewer line across the school property. It is anticipated that within the next year and a half our school 
will be tied into the Billerica sewer installation which will be to our advantage, because it will make the 
leaching field available for other purposes as well as eliminate the cost of the present sewerage system. 

In order to encourage more interest in the House Building Program, a residency requirement is no longer 
necessary. Proof of ownership of a lot of land within the District must be submitted. Other conditions 
were maintained as established. 

Contracts were finalized during the year with the administration, teachers' association and custodial union. 
Both the teachers and custodians have a three year contract. 

Budget discussions started in October. Again members of the finance committees were in evidence and had an 
opportunity to react on all areas of the budget in which they showed concern. After a number of meetings, 
a preliminary budget for the School Year 1978-79 was discussed at the meeting of December 13, with the inten^ 
to finalize the budget in January 1978. 

82 



\lthough we are a public school there are costs included in our budget which are not reflected in a local 
ichool department budget including, short term borrowing, debt retirement, debt service, retirement assess- 
lent and snow removal. In planning the facilities the School Committee utilized the ten year bond issue for 
'unding. There are presently three issues outstanding of which one will be retired in 1979-80, another in 
.980-81 and the third in 1984. The impact of the ten year issue will be significant next year since the cost 
iif one of the issues will no longer appear. 

lourt Case 

I sunnnary judgment was handed down at the Middlesex County Court House in favor of the Regional School Com- 
littee in an effort to regain the budget cut of $503,000 which was voted during the town meetings held in 
he spring of the year. It is hoped that this matter will be resolved in the near future in a way that 
'ould be equitable to all concerned. 




Shawsheen Tech. Superintendent 



1977 was the second school year that our new addition became operational. The increase of twelve new prograi^ 
now provides us a total of twenty-four vocational offerings which gives students and adults excellent opporti^ 
ities to acquire skills in many more areas. We are continuing to get very strong interest in enrollment as 
evidenced by the fact that we had room for 420 incoming ninth grade students and had over 900 apply. 

In order to fully utilize our facilities we have continued the following programs: I 

Day School Program serves 1,523 in twenty-four different vocational programs. The schedule in accordance wil 
state regulations is for all students to have a full week of shop and the alternate week academic programs, j 
During the academic weeks, students have an eight period day with no study periods. The daily schedule goes I 
from 7:50 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Enrollment figures as of October 1, 1977 were as follows: ( 



Town 


9th 


10th 


Uth 


12th 


Total' 


Bedford 


39 


27 


17 


29 


11' 


Billerica 


138 


131 


141 


102 


51. 


Burlington 


66 


68 


55 


53 


241 


Tewksbury 


98 


106 


99 


91 


39^ 


Wilmington 


73 


65 


66 


59 


26ji 


Totals 


414 


397 


378 


334 


1,52 



Afternoon Skill Training Program makes it possible for an additional 320 students to take their academic sub 
jects in the local school and to develop their skill training at Shawsheen in the shop program from 2:30 - ' 
5:00 p.m. each day. ' 

Summer School Program continues to grow as attested by the fact that this year over 1,200 students attended ' 
various classes for a six week period during July and August . 

Senior Skill Program enables those seniors in local high schools, who are not going to college after graduat 
to attend various shop programs full time after February 1 of the senior year. This enables them to acquire 
saleable skill by graduation time. 

Adult Education Program continues to grow with most programs being over subscribed on the opening evening of 
registration. These programs operate Monday through Thursday from 7-10 p.m. involving 1,296 students in fif 
programs . ! 

Career Education has resulted in our Area Coordinator assisting local high schools in developing skill train' 
ing programs within their own facilities. It is expected that these programs will expand as more and more ' 
students appreciate the need to acquire a skill before they graduate. 

Kevin M. Dwyer, Special Needs Coordinator ' 
The purpose of this program is to develop maximal independence for each student by preparing them for profit 
able employment in a vocational or technical career. The goal of economic self-sufficiency is recognized asfl 
being a vital objective for the special needs student. ■ 

Special needs Curriculum at Shawsheen consists of academic skills, vocational-technical preparation, daily ' 
living skills and personal-social skills. A continuum of alternative educational provisions specifically de 
signed to meet the individual needs of each student is provided. A full range of services is offered, from 
regular classroom placement with modification to intensive special education programming. An important basi 
assumption is that each student is programmed individually. For one student regular class placement with 



84 



lodification may be the best alternative, whereas another student may be most effectively placed in a special 
lass for the majority of the day. To be effective, this continuum must be flexible. It is recognized that 
itudent's needs change over a period of time and modifications of student's individual educational plans are 
lade accordingly. 

;pecial Needs personnel provide supportive and remedial instruction in resource rooms. Resource teachers and 
.nstructional aides serve special needs students on an individual or small group basis in the areas of Reading, 
[ath and Language development. Resource personnel also provide support services to regular class teachers 
hrough frequent communication with the academic and technical instructors concerning the individual needs of 
ach student. 

roviding an appropriate educational program for each special needs student at Shawsheen requires a team effort, 
he entire faculty — academic teachers, shop instructors, guidance counselors, instructional aides and adminis- 
rative personnel have responded to the special needs of these students. It is through their sincere interest 
nd dedication, that the special needs students are experiencing success — some for the first time. 

l ohn F. McDermott, Area Coordinator 

ihe need to service the 500 students unable to gain entry to Shawsheen each year is very evident. Bringing 
kill training programs into the local school systems is the most logical approach to fulfill this need. 

here is a minimum of 40% of our comprehensive high school seniors who are not going on to higher education 

nd who need basic job entry skills. Shawsheen can provide a service to the schools by assisting them in look- 

ng at the requirements of local industry and how they can be met. 

ince we are in the heart of the Electronics Industry in the Shawsheen region, we are developing an Electron- 
cs Skill Training Program in the five towns. Students are being trained in the electronics assembly skills 
ti local high schools with excellent opportunities for job placement upon completion of the training program, 
cidustry has been involved in the development of the program and will give preference for emplojTnent to these 
tudents . 

collaborative guidance program for the Afternoon Skill Training Program has received funding from the State 
apartment of Education for the 1978 school year. Counselors from the local school systems will counsel their 
tudents in the afternoon skill program at Shawsheen. This will provide a positive link for the students and 
taff to better serve the student and his or her parents in meeting the career education needs of the students. 

areer Education has been growing rapidly in the country. We in the Shawsheen District are striving to devel- 
? a greater working relationship between the schools and industry. This need is being met by bringing edu- 
ators, representatives of industry and civic leaders together through Career Guidance Leadership Institutes 
2ing funded by the National Alliance of Business. 

lawsheen acts as the catalyst for the development and implementation of new programs by forming a collabora- 
ve approach where we pool the resources of the five towns together to provide sound educational programs 
)r the citizens of our communities. 

/ Documentary Shawsheen Tech was honored this year being selected by the Board of Education for filming of a 
1 documentary on education. 

>ills Bank Newwork The importance of working together with industry was demonstrated by a meeting held at 
lawsheen involving the Skills Bank Network. This operation will make it possible for various industries to 
\ aware of what programs are going on in vocational schools so that they can draw on the "skill bank" to 
:et their skilled help needs. 



I 



oking Ahead As a member of an advisory committee I have been active in a project for developing a program 
tween community colleges and vocational schools in order to establish a cooperative system for mutual use 
vocational facilities. 

oject SEE (Shawsheen Education Experience ) Started this year involving fifth and sixth grade students 



rticipating in shop programs here at Shawsheen. This was of particular concern to encourage more and more 
:male participants in the various programs. 

|ergy Conservation has been a prime factor in the operation of the school. Periodic meetings have taken 
ace in order to take the necessary steps to conserve energy as much as possible through the efficient use 
lights, heat and power. We have also made an effort to inculcate students as part of their training here 



85 



at Shawsheen to be concerned with energy conservation. 



Breakfast Program continues to be well attended this year. The U.S. Department of Agriculture was impressed 
to the point where a video tape was made for the benefit of other schools. 

Student Activities The Spring of 1977 saw the completion of our house building project in Wilmington and the 
following September work was started on a house in Bedford. It is expected that this project will be comple- 
ted in June 1978. 

In conjunction with the Red Cross a blood mobile visited our school and a number of individuals participated 
The Red Cross was so impressed that they arranged another visit for the Spring of 1978. i 

I 

Work done around the school building by the crews of students from various shops has saved the District thou-' 
sands of dollars. In addition, considerable work was done in the Diesel Shop by serving vehicles of the fivi 
towns as well as work at the police station and on a refreshment stand on the athletic field in Billerica. 

We again participated in the Boston Globe Art Awards with three students receiving Gold Keys and two Honorabi 
Mentions. 

Open house was held in May in conjunction with the Art Festival. Features of the Open House included special 
demonstrations in the pool as well as all school shops in full operation. 

Junior Achievement, a unique student operated business venture was sponsored this fall by the General Electr 
Company, Wilmington and Liberty Mutual, Boston. || 

Athletics The Shawsheen Rams, competing in the Commonwealth Athletic Conference, had a very successful yeari 
Winter programs consisted of Hockey, Boys' Basketball, Girls' Basketball, Wrestling, Swimming and Winter Tra|: 
Our Hockey team, completing a 17-3 record, losing to Newburyport in the tournament, has now won the Common- 
wealth Athletic Conference Championship three out of four years that the league has been in existence. I 

Girls' basketball team shared the championships with Greater Lowell compiling a record of 11-3 and losing to 
Keith Hall in the State Tournament. 

During our Spring Program, the Rams competed in Tennis, Lacrosse, Baseball, Softball and Track and Field. T 
Baseball Team competed in the State Tournament beating Hull and being eliminated by East Boston compiling a 
14-5 record while the Girls' Softball Team, the defending champs, finished second in the league with a 12-5 
record. 

The Fall Season consisted of Football, Cross Country and Soccer. The Football Team ended its season with a 
record of 8-2; Cross Country Team defended its championship successfully and finished its dual season 8-1. 
The Shawsheen Rams Sports Program continued to grow in interest with 316 boys and 95 girls competing in a 
very successful year. We thank our district towns for their support in our athletic program. 

The success of Shawsheen Tech is evidenced by the excellent placement record of its graduates. The Class of 
1977 graduated on June 12 with some 249 seniors receiving diplomas. A report on senior placement follows: 



Employed in field 191 

Further Education 12 

Armed Services 14 

Employed in other fields 20 

Process of securing employment 4 

Not placed — Special Circumstances 15 



We at Shawsheen Tech are fortunate to have a number of programs which makes it possible to totally utilize o 
facilities. This is made possible by the understanding and support given by the Regional School Committee. 
In this way, it is possible to serve a maximum number of individuals who otherwise might not have an opporti 
ity to acquire a skill. Benjamin Franklin thought highly of skilled training when he said, "He that hath a 
trade hath an estate." Our graduates that have gone out into the world of industry and business have realii 
the wisdom of Benjamin Franklin and have proven themselves as evidenced by their successes in their respecti 
areas . 

86 



iVeteran^s Agent 



Veterans' services is governed by the General Laws of Massachusetts, Chapter 115, with strict compliance to 
;his Chapter, the rules and policies of which govern the disbursement of aid. Benefits are for the needy 
'eteran and his iimnediate family who have been subject to unforeseen needs. Final approval of benefits comes 
rom the Commissioner of Veterans' Services, Boston, Massachusetts. 

'he balance for the first six months of 1977, from previous appropriation, was $45,256.92. Money encumbered 
rom remaining balance was $2,625.86 for payment of bills and benefits waiting for authorization for period 
:nding June 30, 1977. Total available funds beginning July 1, 1977 was $37,625.86. Total expended for aid 
Veterans and their families for 1977 was $32,179.16. 

otal reimbursement for 1977 from settled assignments and/or accident cases authorized by the Commissioners 
ffice was $3,250.82. One case on assignment reimbursed to Town $1,802.67. (State participation authorized 
nly $1,199.67.) Agent collected full reimbursement. Because 50% of the amount authorized by the Commissi- 
oners Office is shared by the Town, the Town's share on assignment cases was $1,323.91, plus $603.00 which 
igent collected in full. The total amount of $3,250.82 has been turned over to the Town Treasurer, and the 
ommonwealth has been notified so adjustments of any monies can be made before State reimbursement to the 
own. 

his department deals continuously with new and changing benefits and/or laws pertaining to Social Security 
nd G.I. Education, plus aiding applicants for S.S.I. Unemployment due to strikes, shutdowns and lack of 
ork, always has an impact on expenditures, case load varies from time to time. 

tie appropriation for 1977 and six months of 1978 was $35,000.00 as voted at the Annual Town Meeting, a 
ilance of $25,157.86 forwarded for the first six months of 1978. 



}og Officer 



Dogs Licensed 1791 

Dogs Confined 277 

Complaints Covered 3263 

Court Complaints 359 

Court Fines Paid $3590 

Dogs Disposed of 463 

Dogs Killed by Cars 65 

Residents Notified for Licenses 1120 



87 



Town Meetincs 



WARRANT FOR THE ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - March 5, 1977 

WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON j 

TO: THE CONSTABLE OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By-Laws o; 
said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified to vote in Towi 
affairs to meet and assemble at the High School Gymnasium, Saturday, the Fifth of March, A. D. 1977 at 9:4 
o'clock in the forenoon, the polls to be opened at 10:00 a.m. and shall be closed at 8:00 p.m. for the elei 
tion of the Town offices: i 

ARTICLE 1. To bring in your votes on one ballot respectively for the following named offices, to wit: Tw 
Selectmen for the term of three years; One Moderator for the term of one year; Two members of the School 
Committee for the term of three years; One member of the School Committee for the term of one year (Unexpi d 
term); One member of the Housing Authority for a term of five years; One member of the Housing Authority fi 
a term of three years (Unexpired term) ; One member of the Redevelopment Authority for the term of five yea j 
and One member of the Regional Vocational/Technical School District Committee for the term of three years;; 
and to vote on two non-binding public opinion questions as follows: 

QUESTION NO. 1: "Shall the Board of Selectmen petition the Massachusetts Legislature and local representa 
tives to amend the statutory provisions of the Massachusetts General Laws to permit by Town Meeting action | 
vote by the Town of Wilmington for approval or disapproval of a School Budget based upon seventy-five per- 
cent of the votes cast at a Town Meeting on said school budget?" 

Yes 

NO 



QUESTION NO. 2: "Shall the Board of Selectmen petition the Massachusetts Legislature and local representa] 
tives to request that the Commonwealth return to the cities, and towns 100% of the revenue derived from th j 
State Lottery?" 

Yes 

NO 



You are also hereby further required and directed to notify and warn the said inhabitants of the Town of 
Wilmington who are qualified to vote on elections and Town affairs therein to assemble subsequently and mel 
in Town Meeting at the High School Gymnasium, Church Street in said Town of Wilmington, on Saturday, the 
Twelfth day of, March, A. D. 1977 at 1:30 p.m., then and there to act on the following articles: 

In accordance with the above Warrant, the meeting was called to order by the Moderator, Mr. John M. Callan 
at 9:45 a.m., as much of the Warrant as is noted above was read and upon a motion by Mr, Stanley Webber, 
and seconded it was voted to dispense with further reading of the Warrant. 

All voting machines were opened and the zero sheets were posted so that the candidates could examine them \\ 
before the polls were opened. The checkers were prepared with their voting lists and Voter Identification 
cards and everything was in readiness at 10:00 a.m. 

The polls were declared open at 10:00 a.m. by the Moderator, Mr, John M. Callan. 

At 8:00 p.m. the polls were declared closed by Esther L. Russell, Town Clerk, and the printer packs were 



88 



ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION (continued) 



removed from the back of the voting machines and one copy was given to the Total Tally clerks and the other 
copy was posted outside the railing so that each candidate could add his own totals at once. There were 
forty-two (42) absentee ballots cast which were added to the machine totals. 

The Town Clerk read the results of this election at 10:15 p.m. All those elected were present and were sworn 
to the faithful performance of their duties . 

Ml the totals from the twenty-five machines plus the absentee ballots were recorded and declaration thereof 
nade, as by law is directed and were for the following: 



SELECTMEN 


- Three years (Vote for two) 






Jlected 


James F. Banda, 7 Marie Drive 




1 A.Qn 




Peter Enos, 8 Hillside Way 




Ooy 




George W. Hooper, 12 Allen Park Drive 




7 An 


Jlected 


A. John Imbimbo, 22 Cottage Street 




1 ■%9n 

i. 




Bruce MacDonald, 181 Chestnut Street 




1306 




Blanks 




867 








6592 


lODERATOR 


- One year (Vote for one) 






Jlected 


John M, Callan, 571 Woburn Street 




iCU JO 




Blanks 




1238 








3296 


ICHOOL COMMITTEE - Three years (Vote for not more than two) 






;lected 


John D. Brooks, 300 Salem Street 








Lillian m. Buckley, 21 Lucaya Circle 




fil 7 




Paul R. Washburn, 20 Ballardvale Street 




i. ^ / J. 


klected 


Lester E. White, 29 Marcus Road 








Blanks 




1 S7S 










iCHOOL COMMITTEE - One year (unexpired term) (Vote for one) 








David J. Dingle, 21 West Street 




491 




John C. Heine, 224 Chestnut Street 




1080 


lected 


James D. Tighe, 14 Boutwell Street 




1295 




Blanks 




430 


1 






3296 


:tlmington 


HOUSING AUTHORITY - Five years (Vote for one) 






lected 


Lorraine C. Brozyna, 18 Boutwell Street 




1449 




Elmer F. Parker, 11 Forest Street 




996 




Blanks 




851 








3296 


ILMINGTON 


HOUSING AUTHORITY - Three years (unexpired term) (Vote 


for one) 






Matthew Harris, 12 Massachusetts Avenue 




593 


lected 


Kevin J. McMillan, 24 Parker Street 




1931 




Blanks 




772 


1 






3296 


ULMINGTON 


REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY - Five years (Vote for one) 






ylected 


Wilson J. Be lb in, 5 Morse Avenue 




1672 




"Sticker" or "Write-in" candidate-Joseph J. Hartka, 40 


Marcia Road 


537 




Blanks 




1087 



3296 



89 



I 



ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION (continued) 

REGIONAL VOCATIONAL/TECHNICAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE - Three years (Vote for one) 



William C, Cameron, 14 Liberty Street 621 
Robert A. DiPalma, 12 Harold Avenue 529 
Elected Lawrence P. Flaherty, 6 Hobson Avenue 1546 

Blanks 600 

3296 



QUESTION NO. 1. This question is not binding. 

The following is a non-binding public opinion question: 

"Shall the Board of Selectmen petition the Massachusetts Legislature and local representatives to amend the 
statutory provisions of the Massachusetts General Laws to permit by Town Meeting action a vote by the Town c 
Wilmington for approval or disapproval of a School Budget based upon seventy-five percent of the votes cast 
at a Town Meeting on said school budget?" 

YES 1329 



NO 281 



Blanks 1686 
3296 



SUMMARY 

The Selectmen have requested that this question be placed on the ballot in order to determine whether the 
voters favor or oppose direct fiscal control of the school budget by the town meeting vote of seventy-five 
percent of the votes cast. 



QUESTION NO. 2. This question is not binding. 

The following is a non-binding public opinion question: 

"Shall the Board of Selectmen petition the Massachusetts Legislature and local representatives to request 

that the Commonwealth return to the cities and towns 100 percent of the revenue derived from the State 
Lottery?" 

YES 1584 

NO 70 

Blanks 1642 
3296 

SUMMARY 

The Selectmen have requested that this question be placed on the ballot in order to determine the voters' 
preference relative to the distribution from the State of funds raised by the lottery. 

There were Tbree Thousand two hundred ninety-six (3296) votes cast in this election. 

Attest: (Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 

Town Clerk, Wilmington 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - March 12, 1977 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



The Moderator, Mr. John M. Callan, called the meeting to order at 1:47 p.m. there being a quorum present. 

The Town Clerk, Mrs. Esther L. Russell, notes that both the Special and Annual Town Meeting Warrants were 
properly posted, as by Town By-Law are required, 

Mr. Callan introduced Miss Donna Wayman who led the meeting in the pledge of Allegiance to the Flag. 
Rev. Richard Evans led the meeting in prayer. 



90 



»ECIAL TOWN MEETING (continued) 



Lss Wayman, Moderator for School Government Day, spoke on this subject. 

ITICLE 1. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds and 
)propriate for the Blue Cross/Blue Shield and Group Life Insurance Account #941 for Town employees; or do 
lything in relation thereto. 

jtion by Mr. Sterling C. Morris, Town Manager: "I move that the sum of $49,275.00 be appropriated for the 
Lue Cross/Blue Shield and Group Life Insurance Account #941; with the sum of $40,000.00 to be raised by 
ransfer from the current Authentication Fees and Miscellaneous Debt Account, and the balance of $9,275.00 be 
lised by transfer from the Veterans -Assistance Account." Finance Committee recommended approval. Vote taken 
r voice and the Moderator declared the ayes have it. Motion so voted. 

lere being no further business in this Special Town Meeting, a motion to adjourn came at 1:54 p.m. Motion to 
Ijourn so voted. 

r Transfer from the current Authentication Fees and Miscellaneous Debt Account $40,000.00 
iterans -Assistance Account 9,275.00 

$49,275.00 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - March 12, 1977 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



le Moderator called this meeting to order at 1:55 p.m. 

. Callan began the reading of the Warrant and was interrupted by Mr. Aldo Caira, Selectmen Chairman, "I 
ive that the Moderator dispense with further reading of the Warrant and take up and make reference to each 
tide by number." So voted. 

iTICLE 2. To hear reports of Committees and act thereon. 
1 reports were offered. 

iTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of paying 
ipaid bills of previous years, or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee approved. 

!tion by Mr. Morris: "I move to pass over this article." So voted, 

JTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, 
I borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1977, 
: accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to issue a note or notes therefor, 
lyable within one year, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one year in 
fcordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17, or do anything in relation thereto. 

ttion by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the 
ilectmen, to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year beginning 
<^ly 1, 1977, in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to issue a note 
< notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of 
Us than one year in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17." Finance Committee recommended 
nroval. Motion so voted. 

/iflCLE 5. To see how much money the Town will appropriate for the expenses of the Town and the salaries of 
J/eral Town Officers and Departments and determine how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, trans- 
it from available funds, or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. 

('lion by Mr. Morris: "I move that the several and respective sums as recommended by the Finance Committee be 
lised by taxation or by transfer from available funds and appropriated for the purpose set forth in 
'.Icle #5, each item to be taken up separately and voted on, subject to amendment." Motion so voted. 



91 



ARTICLE 5. (continued) 

ACCORDINGLY THE FOLLOWING AMOUNTS WERE VOTED BY TRANSFERS OR TAXATION: 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Selectmen-Legislative 

Salaries 

Expenses 

Selectmen-Elections 

Salaries 

Expenses 



Registrar of Voters 

Salaries 

Expenses 



Finance Committee 

Salary 

Expenses. . . . 



Town Manager 

Salary - Town Manager 

(Amendment by Mr. A. Daniel Gillis: "I move to amend the item Town Manager Salary 
from the amount of $32,810 to $25,000." Amendment lost.) 

Other Salaries 

Expenses 

Town Accountant 

Salary - Town Accountant 

Other Salaries 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay , 

Treasurer 

Salary - Administrative Assistant , 

Other Salaries , 

Expenses 

Tax Title Foreclosures 



Collector 

Salary - Collector 
Other Salaries . . 
Expenses 



Town Clerk 

Salary - Town Clerk 
Other Salaries. . . 
Expenses 



92 



Board of Assessors 

Salary - Principal Assessor 

Other Salaries 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 



fOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT. 



Town Counsel 

Salary (Retainer) 

Expenses (Court Appearances) 



Town Hall 
Salaries , 
Expenses , 



Planning Board 

Salary 

Expenses. . . . 
Capital Outlay. 



ROTECTION PERSONS & PROPERTY 



Police Department 

Salary - Chief 

Lieutenant 

Sergeants 

Patrolmen 

Amendment by Mr, Richard D. Duggan: "I move that the sum of $354,941 be appropriated 
or Police Department Salaries - Patrolmen. The sum of $230,590 to be raised by 
ransfer from the Revenue Sharing Account, and the balance of $124,351 by taxation." 
oted. Amendment so voted.) 

Traffic Supervisors 

Clerks 



Vacation-Fill-in Cost . . . 
Sick Leave-Fill-in Cost . . 
Miscellaneous Extra Details 

Paid Holidays 

Police Dog 



Specialists . , 
Expenses. . . . 
Capital Outlay. 



Constable 
Salary. 



Fire Department 

Salary - Chief 

Deputy Chief 

Lieutenants 

Privates 

1st amendment by Mr. R. Duggan: "I move that the sum of $342,501 be appropriated 
or Fire Department Salaries - Privates: and that the sum of $230,590 be raised by 



(jransfer from the Revenue Sharing Account, and the balance of $111,911 to be raised 
7 taxation.") 

gnd amendment by Mr. George W. Boylen, Jr.: "I move the Fire-Privates account be 



nended to read - $380,277 with $230,590 transferred from available funds and $149,687 
be raised by taxation." Moderator said we would vote on largest amount first, 
oice vote taken - chair in doubt. Standing vote taken - Yes-220 No-142 

93 



23,119.00 
19,064.00 
3,200.00 



45,383.00 



10,000.00 
9.000.00 
19,000.00 



18,370.00 
22,685.00 
41,055.00 



3,500.00 
12,850.00 
450.00 
16,800.00 

346,030.00 



30 
19 
96 
124 



,000.00 
,051.00 
,411.00 
,351.00 



39 
27 
40 
30 
32 
22 



,457.00 
,924.00 
,000.00 
,000.00 
,000.00 
,452.00 
800.00 
,050.00 
,450.00 
,940.00 



4, 
26, 
3, 

496,886.00 



100.00 



30,000.00 
20,488.00 
65,741.00 
149,687.00 



Fire Department (continued) 

sp.cond amendment so voted. (Main motion as amended so voted.) 

Call Fire & Ambulance 

Vacation-Fill-in Cost 

Sick Leave-Fill-in Cost 

Paid Holidays 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

Civil Defense 

Salary 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

Dog Officer 

Salary 

(Amendment by Mr. Joseph Balestrieri: "I move to amend under line item Dog Officer 
Salaries to $13,500, in order to nake this a full-time position in the town." 
Amendment lost.) 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

Building Inspector 

Salary - Building Inspector 

Other Salaries 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

Board of Appeals 

Salary 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 

Salary 

Expenses 



TOTAL PROTECTION PERSONS & PROPERTY 



15 
40 
19 
19 
13 
7 



,000.00 
,000.00 
,000.00 
,400.00 
,050.00 
,000.00 



379,366.00 



1,500.00 
1,015.00 
325.00 
2,840.00 



4,250.00 



2,400.00 



6,650.00 



16,879.00 
11,574.00 
2,350.00 



30,803.00 



1,075.00 
260.00 

1,335.00 



1,500.00 
50.00 
1,550.00 

919,530.00 



PUBLIC WORKS 
Town Engineer 

Salary - Town Engineer. . 

Other Salaries 

Expenses 

Highway 

Salary - Superintendent . 

Other Salaries 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

Drainage Projects .... 

Sidewalk Program 

Public Street Lights. . . 
Road Machinery - Expenses 
Chapter 90 Construction . 



23,014.0 
50,767.0 
2,100.0C 
75,881,0C 



21,533.00 
222,490.00 
145,350.00 
6,100.0( 
25,000.0( 
50,000.00 
100,000.001 
45,000,0(1 
3,536.O0l 



94 



Highway (continued) 

Amendment by Mr. Duggan: "I move that the sum of $40,000 be appropriated for 
lhapter 90 Construction; $36,464 to be raised by transfer from the Chapter 283, 
,cts of 1976 Account, and the balance of $3,536 to be raised by taxation." Voted 
is amended . ) 

Chapter 90 Maintenance $ 9,000.00 

628,009.00 



Chapter 81 Maintenance 

Motion by Mr. Duggan: "I move that the sum of $50,000 be appropriated for 
lhapter 81 Maintenance; and that the sum of $50,000 be raised by transfer from 
lhapter 283, Acts of 1976 Account, with a balance of zero to be raised by taxation.") 

Snow & Ice Control 

Salaries 76,488.00 

Expenses 11,470.00 

Motion by Mr. Duggan, Finance Committee, Chairman: "I move that the sum of 

87,000 be appropriated for Snow and Ice Control Expenses; $75,530 to be raised 

y transfer from the Anti-Recession Funds Account, and the balance of $11,470 

o be raised by taxation.") 

Capital Outlay 6,000.00 

93,958.00 

Tree Warden 

Salaries 23,268.00 

Expenses 7,100.00 

Motion by Mr. Thomas Sullivan to amend the figure of $4,600 to $7,100. The 

oderator took the highest figure first and the amendment to $7,100 was so 

oted. Main motion as amended was voted.) 

Capital Outlay 

Dutch Elm Control 

Salaries 20,028.00 

Expenses 2,500.00 

Gypsy Moth Control 

Salaries 14,586.00 

Expenses 2,500.00 

69,982.00 

Cemetery 

Salary - Superintendent 15,558.00 

Other Salaries 38,131.00 

>Iotion by Mr. Duggan: "I move that the sum of $55,232 be appropriated for the 

smetery Department Salaries - Other Account; $6,896 to be raised by transfer 

com the Sale of Cemetery Lots Account; $10,205 to be raised by transfer from 

16 Interest on Cemetery Trust Funds Account; and the balance of $38,131 to be 

lised by taxation.") 

Expenses 15,800.00 

Capital Outlay 

Amendment by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Capital Outlay Account under Cemetery 

2 amended to read $1,450." Lost.) 

69,489.00 

Parks 

Salaries 5,000.00 

Expenses 1,000.00 

6,000.00 

)TAL PUBLIC WORKS 943,319.00 



95 



HEALTH AND SANITATION 
Board of Health 

Salary - Director ? 20, 037. d 

Other Salaries 42,804.0" 

Expenses 2,250.0' 

Hospital & Medical Care 850.0 

Solid Waste Disposal 174,500.0 

(Finance Committee figure $181,500. Mr. Morris moved to amend the Solid Waste 

Disposal account under Board of Health to be amended to read $174,500. The 

Moderator took the highest figure first and it was lost. Vote on amendment so voted.) 

Mental Health 

(Motion by Mr, Morris: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and 

appropriate the sum of $33,000 for Mental Health and that the account be 

allocated as follows; $13,500 Share, $14,500 for Wilmington Family Counseling 

Service and $5,000 Mystic Valley Health Association." This being the larger 

figure it was voted on first and motion was lost,) 

(Motion by Mr, Richard D. Duggan: "I move that we zero line item Mystic Valley 
Mental Health Association - $13,500 Share and $14,500 Wilmington Family Counseling." 
Tonal $28,000 so voted.) 



TOTAL HEALTH & SANITATION 268,441.0 

VETERANS' AID 

Veterans' Aid & Benefits 

Salary - Part-time Agent 2,860.0 

Other Salaries 8,171.0 

Expenses 390,0 

Assistance, Veterans 35,000,0 

46,421,0 

MAINTENANCE OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS 
School Maintenance & Operations 

Salary - Superintendent 19, 485. C 

Salaries - Other 608, 169. C 

Expenses 121, 500. C 

Fuel Heating 180, 000. C; 

Cost of Vandalism 18, 000. C 

Capital Outlay 24, 050. C 

971, 204. C 

School Grounds Maintenance < 

Expenses 9,800.Ci 

Capital Outlay 3,000,C , 

12,800.C| 

Town Building Maintenance 

Expenses 78, 500. ( 

Capital Outlay 

78, 500. ( 

TOTAL MAINTENANCE OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS 1,062, 504, ( 

LIBRARY 

Board of Library Trustees 

Salary - Director 18, 934. ( 

Salaries - Other 98, Oil. ( 

Expenses 58,247. 



(Motion by Mr, Duggan: "I move that the sum of $69,320 be appropriated for the 
Library Expense Account; $6,413 to be raised by transfer from the State Aid to 
Public Libraries Account, $4,660 to be raised by transfer from the Interest on 
Library Trust Funds Account, and the balance of $58,247 to be raised by taxation." 
So voted.) 



96 



irary (continued) 
Capital Outlay 



;reation 

Salary - Director 

Other Salaries 

Expenses 

MANENT BUILDING COMMITTEE 

Salary 

Expenses 

Contractual Services 

lUtification committee 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

TORICAL COMMISSION 

Personal Services 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

Harnden Tavern 

SERVATION CCMMISSION 

Personal Services 

Expenses 

j. 

AL OF ABOVE BEGINNING WITH LIBRARY 
lOOL DEPARTMENT 

tion by Mr. John D. Brooks: "I move that it be and hereby is the 
ermination of the School Committee that the sum of $7,233,899 is the 
unt necessary for the support and operation of the public schools in 

Town of Wilmington for the 1977-1978 fiscal year, and that the budget 
; 1977-1978 be reduced by the estimated remaining unspent funds in the 
rcral accounts under public laws 864 and 874 in the amount of $42,292 
wing an amount of $7,191,607 to be raised by taxation." After much 
lormation by the School Committee and debate, the motion as read was so 
i^d and declared so by the Moderator.) 

Salaries & Operation 

Less Federal Funds 

Vocational Training 

Regional Vocational School District 

; . Morris amendment to $568,301. Finance Committee in agreement with 
I ndment so voted as amended.) 

C AL SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

: NCIL ON AGING 

Personal Services 

' Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

( endment by Mr. Belbin to add $510 to this account because their stove and 
r rigerator needed to be replaced. Amendment so voted. Main motion as 
a nded so voted to raise by taxation $1,200.) 



612.00 
175,804.00 



18,222.00 
75,724.00 
32.135.00 
126,081.00 



1,838.00 



1,838.00 



1,000.00 
2,050.00 


500.00 
3,550.00 



1,400.00 
1,585.00 
2,985.00 



310,258.00 



7,233,899,00 
42,292.00 
7,191,607.00 
5,400.00 
568,301.00 



7,765,308.00 



15,200.00 
23,945.00 
1,200.00 



40,345.00 



97 



Recess - now 6:00 p.m. to return at 8:00 p.m. so voted. Meeting reconvened at 8:06 p.m. 



MATURING DEBT AND INTEREST 

Schools $ 451,890.00 

General Government. . . 104,549.00 

Water 

(Motion by Mr. Duggan: "I move that the sum of $131,261 be appropriated for 

Maturing Debt and Interest - Water; $131,261 to be raised by transfer from 

Water Available Surplus, with a balance of zero to be raised by taxation." 

Motion so voted.) 

Sewer 48,110.00 

Authentication Fees & Misc. Debt 50,000.00 

TOTAL MATURING DEBT & INTEREST 654,549.00 

UNCLASSIFIED & RESERVE 

Insurance & Bonds C 

(Motion by Mr. Duggan: "I move that the sum of $194,044 be appropriated for Insurance 

and Bonds; $304 to be raised by transfer from the Insurance Dividend Account; 

$193,740 by transfer from Free Cash with a balance of zero to be raised by taxation.") 

Reserve 50,000.0C 

Blue Cross-Blue Shield & Group Life 147, 284. OC 

(Motion by Mr. Duggan: "I move that the sum of $460,000 be appropriated 

for Blue Cross-Blue Shield and Group Life; $312,716 to be raised by 

transfer from Free Cash and the balance of $147,284 to be raised by taxation.") 

Local Transportation 7,445.0C 

Town Report 3,000.0C 

Sewer Maintenance 4,000.0C 

Appraisals 15,000.0C 

Training & Conference - In State 9,026.0C 

Training & Conference - Out of State 3,000.0( 

Veterans' Retirement 35,000.0( 

Employees' Retirement (Unused Sick Leave Account) 5,000.0( 

Microfilming & Reader 1,000.0( 

Incentive Pay-Police 14,100.0( 

Incentive Pay-Fire 15,100.0( 

1978 Salary Adjustments & Additional Costs 185, 000. 0( 

Additional Employees by Department ( 



(Amendment by Mr. J. Christopher Neville: "I move to amend the figure 

of zero dollars as it is under the heading of Additional Employees to 

see if the Town will vote to authorize by taxation or transfer of available 

funds, the sum of $34,164 to fund the appointment of three additional police 

officers to be drawn from the current Civil Service Police List." Lost 

Unemployment Payments - Town & School 5, 000. OA 

Community Schools Study Committee 1,000.0( 

(Motion by Mrs. Barbara Hooper, Chairman: "I move that Article 5, Unclassified 

and Reserve, be amended by adding the following item: Community Schools Study 

Committee, $1,000." So voted.) 

TOTAL UNCLASSIFIED & RESERVE 499, 955. 0< 

Total Budget By Taxation $12,856,660.00 
Total Budget By Transfers 828,189.00 
Revenue Sharing Account 461,180.00 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purchase of the 
several following items of capital expenditures and further to authorize the sale or turn-in, if any, of 
several items listed below, and for the use of the several departments so designated, or do anything in ret 
lation thereto. The above was made into a motion and read by Mr. Morris and said motion was so voted. 

a. Police Department 

1. To purchase five Police vehicles. 



98 



.RTICLE 6. (continued) 

Motion by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of 
$25,000 for the purchase of five Police vehicles, and at the discretion of the Town Manager authorize the 
sale or turn-in of five vehicles presently used by the Police Department." Finance Committee recommended 
approval of $25,000. Motion so voted. 

2. To purchase a telephone recording system. 

Motion to pass over Article 6, Section a2, Police Department, and take no action thereon so voted. 
Fire Department 

1. To purchase a modular ambulance. 

Motion: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sxjm of $30,000 for the 
purchase of a modular ambulance for the use of the Fire Department, and at the discretion of the Town 
Manager authorize the sale or turn-in of an ambulance presently used by the Fire Department." Finance 
Committee recommended $30,000. Motion so voted. 

Engineering Department 
1. To purchase a van. 

Motion to pass over this article so voted. 
Highway Department 

1. Design plans for an addition to Highway Garage and Office. 
Motion to pass over this article so voted. 

2. To purchase a 5 to 7 yard dump truck with coverall assembly. 

Motion: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $19,000 for the 
purchase of a 5 to 7 yard dump truck with coverall assembly for the use of the Highway Department, and 
I at the discretion of the Town Manager authorize the sale or turn-in of a dump truck presently used by 
j the Highway Department." Finance Committee approved $19,000. Motion so voted. 

i 3. To purchase a 4 to 5 yard dump body with catch basin cleaner change-over. 

I Motion: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $13,000 for the 
I purchase of a dump truck for the use of the Highway Department, and at the discretion of the Town 
I Manager authorize the sale or turn-in of a dump truck presently used by the Highway Department," 
Finance Committee approved $13,000. Motion so voted. 

4. To purchase a 3/4 ton pickup. 

Motion: "I move that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $5,500 for the purchase of a 
3/4 ton pickup for the use of the Highway Department, and at the discretion of the Town Manager 
authorize the sale or turn-in of a pickup presently used by the Highway Department." Finance Committee 
recommended no action because of tie vote. Motion lost. 

5. To purchase a tractor. 

Motion: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $9,000 for the 
purchase of a tractor for the use of the Highway Department, and at the discretion of the Town Manager 
authorize the sale or turn-in of a tractor presently used by the Highway Department." Finance Committee 
recommended $9,000. Motion lost by voice vote. Seven rose to show doubt of the vote. Standing vote 
taken - Yes-162 No-91. So voted. 

Tree Department 

1. To purchase a 3/4 ton four wheel drive pickup. 

Motion: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $7,500 for the pur- 
chase of a 3/4 ton four wheel drive pickup for the use of the Tree Department, and at the discretion of 
the Town Manager authorize the sale or turn-in of a pickup truck presently used by the Tree Department." 
Finance Committee recommended approval of $7,500. Motion so voted. 

2. To purchase a Thermal Fogger for mosquito control. 

Motion: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $3,500 for the use 
of the Tree Department, and at the discretion of the Town Manager authorize the sale or turn-in of a 
fogger presently used by the Tree Department." Finance Committee recommended approval of $3,500. Motion 
so voted. 



99 



J 



ARTICLE 6. (continued) 
f. Public Buildings 

1. To purchase a platform truck with dump, I 
Motion to pass over this article and take no action thereon so voted. 

2. Roof replacement for the West Intermediate School. 

Motion: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $16,000 for the re- 
placement of the roof at the West Intermediate School." Finance Committee recommended approval of 
$16,000. Motion so voted. 

3. Roof repairs for the Woburn Street School. 

Motion: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $12,000 for the re- 
placement of the roof at the Woburn Street School." The Finance Committee approved $12,000. Motion 
so voted. 



4. Irrigation system for the High School football field. 

Motion to pass over this article and take no action thereon so voted. 

5. Sod for the High School athletic fields. 

Motion to pass over this article and take no action thereon so voted. 

6. Rebuild the High School track. 

Motion to pass over this article and take no action thereon so voted. 

7. Irrigation system for the North Intermediate Soccer and Baseball field. 
Motion to pass over this article and take no action thereon so voted. 



ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $2,000 for the observance of 
Memorial Day and Veterans Day, and that the Moderator appoint a committee who shall arrange and have chargi 
of said observances, or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. James F. Banda: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of 
$2,000 for the observance of Memorial Day and Veterans Day, and that the Moderator appoint a committee who 
shall arrange and have charge of said observances." Mr. Winters moved to amend the amount to $3,000. 
Finance Committee approved $3,000. Voted on the larger figure first. $3,000 so voted. Motion as amended 
so voted. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $750 each for a total of $l,50i 
for the purpose of renewing under authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws as amended the 
lease of: 

a. Veterans of Foreign Wars Clubhouse on Main Street for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters fo: 
the Nee-Ellsworth Post No. 2458 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States. I 

b. American Legion Clubhouse, Inc., in Wilmington for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters for til 
Wilmington Post No. 136 of the American Legion, or do anything in relation thereto. i 

The Finance Committee recommended disapproval. Mr. James F. Banda moved to appropriate $1,500 or $750 for I 
each of the above veterans' headquarters and to raise and appropriate the same by taxation. Motion so voteti 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and the Town Manager to apply 'j 
for, accept, and enter into contracts from time to time, for the expenditure of any funds without further 
appropriation allotted to Wilmington by the U. S. Federal Government under any Federal grant program, or do ) 
anything in relation thereto. Motion to move the above article. Mrs. Barbara Sullivan moved to amend the I 
above article by deleting the word 'or' between 'and' 'the' Town Manager. Amendment so voted. Main motion 
as worded above so voted. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to accept Section 1001 of Chapter 41 of the General Laws which prcl 
vides that the Town shall indemnify and save harmless municipal officers, elected or appointed, from person;] 
financial loss and expense including reasonable legal fees and costs, if any, in an amount not to exceed omj 
million dollars, arising out of any claim, demand, suit or judgment by reason of any act or omission includ) 
ing a violation of the civil rights of any person under any federal law, if the official at the time of sucl 



100 




ARTICLE 10. (continued) 

act or omission was acting within the scope of his official duties or employment, or do anything in relation 
thereto. 

totion by Mr. James R. Miceli: "I move that the Town vote to accept Section 1001 of Chapter 41 of the General 
Laws which provides that the Town shall indemnify and save harmless municipal officers, elected or appointed, 
from financial loss and expense including reasonable legal fees and costs, if any, in an amount not to exceed 
one million dollars, arising out of any claim, demand, suit or judgment by reason of any act or omission in- 
cluding a violation of the civil rights of any person under any federal law, if the official at the time of 
such act or omission was acting within the scope of his official duties or employment." Finance Committee 
recommended approval. It was put to a voice vote and the Moderator declared that the "ayes" have it. So 
voted. 

On December 15, 1976 the Town Clerk received the following letter from the Town Manager to put on file prior 
to the Annual Town Meeting: 

irs. Esther L. Russell 
rown Clerk 
Town Hall 
Wilmington, Ma. 

tear Mrs . Russell: 

[ wish to file with you the following statement in accordance with Section 10 of Chapter 43B of the General 
[iaws : 

[ propose that Chapter 592 of the Acts of 1950, An Act Establishing a Town Manager Form of Government for the 
■own of Wilmington, be amended by adding after Section 12 (a) the following subsections: 

Jection 12 (a) 1: Notwithstanding paragraph 12 (a), the Town Manager may appoint a Director of Public Safety 
Lnstead of the appointment a Chief of Police and/or Chief of the Fire Department. 

Yours very truly, 

s/Sterling C. Morris 

!CM/md Town Manager 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to amend in accordance with the Home Rule Procedures Act, 

i Chapter 592 of the Acts of 1950, entitled "An Act Establishing a Town Manager Form of Government for the 
Town of Wilmington" by adding the following subsection: 
Section 12 (a) 1 

Not withstanding paragraph 12 (a), the Town Manager may appoint a Director of Public Safety instead of the 
appointment of a Chief of Police and /or Chief of the Fire Department. 

This amendment shall take effect 31 days after the election at which this charter amendment is approved, or 
do anything in relation thereto. 

Mr. Morris moved the adoption of Article 11 and it was lost on a voice vote. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Revised By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of 
l/ilmington by adding under Chapter 5: 

Section 36. Beggars, Solicitors and Peddlers. 

No person unless otherwise authorized shall go from place to place within the Town selling or bartering 
or carrying for sale or barter or exposing therefor or taking orders therefor any goods, wares, or 
merchandise; nor shall any person go from place to place within the Town begging or soliciting alms or 
contributions for any person, cause or organization, either on foot or from any animal or vehicle with- 
out having first recorded his name and address with the Chief of Police and furnished such other infor- 
mation as may be requested of him. The Chief of Police shall thereupon, if satisfied with the honesty 
of the applicant, issue a permit for a period not exceeding twelve months, which must be shown on re- 
quest, and shall state that said person or organization has duly registered and is entitled to go from 
place to place within the Town for the purpose specified. 

The Chief of Police may, however, authorize the director of any organization within the Town to solicit 

101 



ARTICLE 12. (continued) 

such contributions, etc. without having each solicitor under his direction registered, or do anything ii 
relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. A. Daniel Gillis, Selectman: "I move that the Town vote to amend the Revised By-Laws of the 
Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington by adding under Chapter 5, Section 36. Motion follows the above arti- 
cle with the two amendments - (adding after 'said person' the words 'or organization' and deleting the word 
'religious' after 'director of any'. Motion so voted. Motion as amended so voted. 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of acquir- 
ing a site for a wellfield and Water Department purposes, and to determine how the appropriation shall be 
raised, whether by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise and further, to see if the Town 
will vote to authorize the Board of Water & Sewer Commissioners and/or the Selectmen to purchase or take by 
eminent domain, or accept as a gift certain parcels of land for such purposes, said land being described as 
follows : 

Beginning at a point in the northerly sideline of the 1933 County Layout of Shawsheen Avenue, said 
point being easterly and distant 509.33 feet from the easterly terminus of a curve of 700.60 feet 
radius, thence N 64 degrees 08'00" W distant 509.33 feet by said sideline to a point of curvature, 
thence bearing to the right with a curve of 700.60 feet radius distant 153.86 feet by said sideline to 
a point of tangency, thence N 51 degrees 33*01" W distant 274.76 feet by said sideline to a point, 
thence N 48 degrees 31 '00" W distant 92.59 feet by said sideline to a point, thence N 46 degrees 
18' 20" E distant 121.30 feet by land of Walsh to a point, thence N 68 degrees 48' 24" E distant 73,40 
feet by said land to a point, thence N 45 degrees 08' 59" E distant 153.16 feet by said land to a point, 
thence N 24 degrees 14' 52" E distant 230.16 feet by said land to a point, thence N 00 degrees 59' 19" 
W distant 286.77 feet by said land to a point, thence N 39 degrees 33'32" W distant 110.35 feet by saidi 
land to a point, thence N 66 degrees 33'02" E distant 279.06 feet by said land to a point, thence N 
38 degrees 19 '21" E distant 86.05 feet by said land to a point, thence N 32 degrees 07 '02" W distant 
220.42 feet by said land to a point, thence N 54 degrees 44 '27" E distant 564.39 feet by land of Ross, 
Wedgewood Avenue and land of LeBlanc to a point, thence S 40 degrees 39' 57" E distant 25.53 feet by 
land of the Boston and Maine Railroad to a point, thence N 76 degrees 08' 16" E distant 32.30 feet by 
said land to a point, thence S 46 degrees 17 '08" E distant 376.50 feet by said land to a point, thence 
S 52 degrees 13' 51" E distant 178.00 feet by said land to a point, thence bearing to the right with a 
curve of 2967.00 feet radius distant 374.71 feet by said land to a point of tangency, thence S 
32 degrees 10'41" E distant 284.64 feet by said land to a point, thence S 57 degrees 49'24" W distant 
26.37 feet by said land to a point, thence S 72 degrees 05 '05" W distant 622.00 feet by land of the 
Town of Wilmington to a point, thence S 24 degrees 59'45" W distant 485.00 feet by said land to a point 
thence S 03 degrees 47 '40" W distant 210.47 feet by land of Janerico to a point, thence S 16 degrees 
22'43" W distant 177.10 feet by said land to a point, thence S 09 degrees 22'43" W distant 77.87 feet 
to the point of beginning, being lots Al and A2 containing 38.0371 acres; all is shown on a plan en- 
titled "Subdivision Plan of Land in Wilmington, Mass., Scale 1" = 100', April 29, 1976, Whitman & 
Howard, Inc., Engineers & Architects, 45 William Street, Wellesley, Mass.", a copy of which is on file 
in the office of the Town Engineer, or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee recommended 
approval. Planning Board recommended the acquisition of cranberry bog land. 

Motion by Mr. Morris: "I move to pass over this article and take no action thereon." So voted to pass over 
article. 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Water and Sewer Commissioners, and/or 
the Board of Selectmen to petition the Legislature to amend the interest provisions of Section 6 of | 
Chapter 297, Acts of 1958, of the Sewer Act, to read as follows: ! 
"The provisions of said General Laws relative to the assessment, apportionment, division, reassessment, I 
abatement and collection of sewer assessments, to liens therefor and to interest thereon, except as 
provided herein, shall apply to assessments and annual charges made under this act, and the interest i 
shall be at the rate of five percent per annum.", or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the 
Board of Water and Sewer Commissioners. 

Motion by Mr, George R. Allen: "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Water and Sewer 
Commissioners and/or the Board of Selectmen to petition the Legislature to amend the interest provisions of , 
Section 6 of Chapter 297, Acts of 1958, the Sewer Act, to read as follows: 

The provisions of said General Laws relative to the assessment, apportionment, division, reassessment., 
abatement and collection of sewer assessments, to liens therefor and to interest thereon, except as 
provided herein, shall apply to assessments and annual charges made under this act, and the interest 
shall be at the rate of five percent per annum," 



102 



VRTICLE 14. (continued) 

?inance Committee recommended approval. Motion as read so voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to transfer certain funds from accounts variously described as 
ni64 Development of the Salem Street Wellfield, #1175 Construction of a Permanent Pumping Station at the 
[own Park Wellfield, #1166 Lake Street Betterment Account, #1161 Jacquith Road Betterment Account, #1160 
irattle Street Betterment Account, and #949 Dirty Water Problems Study Account to a new account to be des- 
ignated as #1165 General Wellfield Account, to be used for the purpose of improving existing wells and well- 
Elelds, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Water & Sewer Commissioners. 

lotion by Mr. Arthur Smith, "I move that the Town vote to transfer the following unexpended funds remaining 
Ln various Water Department accounts to a new account, to be designated as Account #1165, General Wellfield 
Account, to be used for the purpose of improving existing wells and wellfields: $45,438.59 from Account 
m64, Salem Street Wellfield Account; $14,152.97 from Account #1175, Town Park Pumping Station Account; 
!2,398.50 from Account #1161, Jaquith Road Betterment Account; $2,228.60 from Account #949, Dirty Water 
>roblems Study Account; $818.77 from Account #1160, Brattle Street Betterment Account; and $178.80 from 
fll66. Lake Street Betterment Account, said funds amounting in the agregate to $65,216.23." Finance 
Committee recommended approval. Motion so voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Water and Sewer Commissioners to acquire any fee, 
;asement, or other interest together with temporary construction easements by eminent domain, purchase, gift, 
)r otherwise necessary to effect the improvements to the Town sewerage system voted under Article 12 of the 
ipecial Town Meeting of June 23, 1975, said easements being described as follows: 

Beginning at a point in the westerly sideline of Hobson Avenue said point being marked by a stone bound, 
thence S 13 degrees 16' 10" E distant 40.00 feet by said sideline to a point, thence S 76 degrees 43' 50" 
W distant 86.58 feet by land of Amaro and through land of C'Brien to a point, thence S 38 degrees 59*45" 
W distant 314.61 feet through land of O'Brien to a point, thence S 42 degrees 54*08" W distant 101.66 
feet through said land to a point, thence N 70 degrees 29*54" W distant 21.79 feet by the end line of 
Baker Street to a point, thence N 42 degrees 54*08" E distant 109.63 feet through land of 0*Brien to a 
point, thence N 38 degrees 59 '45" E distant 320.77 feet through said land to a point, thence N 76 degrees 
43' 50" E distant 13.42 feet by said land to a point, thence N 13 degrees 16' 10" W distant 20.00 feet by 
land of McLean to a point, thence N 76 degrees 43' 50" E distant 80.00 feet by land of Storms to the point 
of beginning, substantially as shown on a plan entitled "Easement Plan of Land in Wilmington, Mass., 
Scale 1" = 40*, March 1, 1976, Whitman and Howard, Inc., Engineers & Architects, 89 Broad Street, Boston, 
Mass."; beginning at a point in the southerly sideline of Grove Avenue, said point being westerly and 
distant 5.24 feet from a point of intersection, thence S 52 degrees 08'40" E distant 110.99 feet by the 
northerly sideline of Cottage Street to a point, thence N 86 degrees 57*37" E distant 57.34 feet by said 
sideline to a point, thence N 03 degrees 02*23" W distant 10.00 feet by said sideline to a point, thence 
N 86 degrees 57 '37" E distant 85.00 feet by said sideline to a point, thence N 89 degrees 55' 33" E 
distant 15.02 feet by said sideline to a point, thence N 81 degrees 35' 26" E distant 51.89 feet by said 
sideline to a point, thence N 82 degrees 08*40" E distant 35.00 by said sideline to a point, thence S 
79 degrees 20*40" E distant 84.20 feet to a point, thence S 16 degrees 02*50" E distant 31.40 feet 
across Cottage Street to a point, thence S 56 degrees 51*06" W distant 2.81 feet by the southerly side- 
line of Cottage Street to a point, thence N 79 degrees 20*40" W distant 91.39 feet by said sideline to a 
point, thence S 82 degrees 08*40" W distant 30.11 feet by said sideline to a point, thence S 81 degrees 
35*26" W distant 44.12 feet by said sideline to a point, thence S 86 degrees 57'37" W distant 81.75 
feet by said sideline to a point, thence S 71 degrees 19*56" W distant 49.30 feet by said sideline to 
a point, thence S 32 degrees 57*56" W distant 40.15 feet by said sideline to a point, thence N 52 
degrees 08'40" W distant 207.87 feet by said sideline to a point, thence N 84 degrees 43*50" E distant 

158.51 feet by the southerly sideline of Grove Avenue to the point of beginning, substantially as shown 
on a plan entitled "Easement Plan of Land in Wilmington, Mass., Scale 1" = 40*, April 27, 1976, Whitman 
and Howard, Inc., Engineers & Architects, 45 William Street, Wellesley, Mass."; beginning at a point 
in the northerly sideline of Burnap Street at its intersection with Pond Street, said point being wester- 
ly and distant 7.44 feet from the westerly terminus of a curve of 70.00 feet radius, thence S 16 degrees 
48*48" W distant 54.15 feet across Burnap Street to a point, thence bearing to the left with a curve of 
100.00 feet radius distant 53.82 feet by the southerly sideline of Burnap Street to a point of tangency, 
thence N 72 degrees 02*00" W distant 123.63 feet by said sideline to a point, thence N 17 degrees 58* 00" 

IE distant 40.00 feet across Burnap Street to a point, thence S 72 degrees 02*00" E distant 173.80 feet 
by the northerly sideline of Burnap Street to a point, thence S 72 degrees 02*00" E distant 7.44 feet 
by the northerly sideline of Pond Street to a point of curvature, thence bearing to the left with a curve 
of 70.00 feet radius distant 61.78 feet by said sideline to a point of tangency, thence N 57 degrees 
23*54" E distant 84.47 feet by said sideline to a point of curvature, thence bearing to the left with a 



103 



ARTICLE 16. (continued) 

curve of 20.00 feet radius distant 27.88 feet by the sideline of Pond Street to a point of tangency, 
thence N 22 degrees 29' 00" W distant 288.03 feet by the westerly sideline of Pond Street to a point of 
curvature, thence bearing to the left with a curve of 69.36 feet radius distant 59.98 feet by said side 
line to a point, thence N 17 degrees 58' 00" E distant 40.00 feet across Hayward Street to a point, 
thence S 72 degrees 02' 00" E distant 117.07 feet by the northerly sideline of Hayward Street to a point 
thence S 17 degrees 58'00" W distant 40.00 feet across Hayward Street to a point, thence bearing to the 
left with a curve of 15.00 feet radius distant 34.15 feet by the sideline of Pond Street to a point, 
thence S 22 degrees 29' 00" E distant 263.05 feet by the easterly sideline of Pond Street to a point, 
thence S 32 degrees 36'06" E distant 40.00 feet by said sideline to a point, thence S 57 degrees 23' 54" 
W distant 180.00 feet by the southerly sideline of Pond Street to a point of curvature, thence bearing 
to the left with a curve of 20.00 feet radius distant 31.42 feet by said sideline to a point of tangenc 
thence N 32 degrees 36' 06" W distant 91.28 feet by the northerly sideline of Burnap Street to the point 
of beginning, all as shown on a plan entitled "Easement Plan of Land in Wilmington, Mass., Scale 
1" = 40', March 12, 1976, Whitman and Howard, Inc., Engineers & Architects, 89 Broad Street, Boston, 
Mass."; beginning at a point in the northerly sideline of Grove Avenue said point being easterly and 
distant 4.16 feet from a point of intersection, thence N 25 degrees 42 '00" E distant 145.55 feet throug 
land of Shea and Marshall to a point, thence N 12 degrees 50'11" E distant 104.73 feet through land of 
Marshall, Town of Wilmington and Rynne to a point, thence N 85 degrees 55' 30" W distant 74.76 feet by 
the southerly sideline of Burnap Street to a point, thence N 75 degrees 51' 14" W distant 100.00 feet by 
said sideline to a point, thence N 14 degrees 08'46" E distant 30.00 feet across Burnap Street to a 
point, thence S 75 degrees 51*14" E distant 97.36 feet by the northerly sideline of Burnap Street to a 
point, thence S 85 degrees 55' 30" E distant 147.36 feet by said sideline to a point, thence S 04 degree 
04*30" W distant 30.00 feet across Burnap Street to a point, thence N 85 degrees 55'30" W distant 55.00 
feet by the southerly sideline of Burnap Street to a point, thence S 12 degrees 50*11" W distant 110.07 
feet by land of Rynne through land of the Town of Wilmington and Marshall to a point, thence S 25 
degrees 42*00" W distant 141.32 feet through land of Marshall and Shea to a point, thence N 82 degrees 
16*29" W distant 21.03 feet by the northerly sideline of Grove Avenue to the point of beginning, sub- 
stantially as shown on a plan entitled "Easement Plan of Land in Wilmington, Mass., Scale 1" = 40', 
March 17, 1976, Whitman and Howard, Inc., Engineers & Architects, 89 Broad Street, Boston, Mass."; 
beginning at a point in the westerly sideline of Lake Street, said point being the southeasterly 
comer of land of Rowan, thence N 34 degrees 48' 20" E distant 102.03 feet by the westerly sideline of 
South Street to a point, thence N 33 degrees 30*00" E distant 469.00 feet by said sideline to a point, 
thence N 46 degrees 00*00" E distant 150.00 feet by said sideline to a point, thence S 44 degrees 
00*00" E distant 35.00 feet across South Street to a point, thence S 43 degrees 59'00" W distant 148. 2f 
feet by the easterly sideline of South Street to a point, thence S 30 degrees 43*00" W distant 164.00 
feet by said sideline to a point, thence S 37 degrees 10' 00" W distant 100,00 feet by said sideline to 
a point, thence S 36 degrees 23 '40" W distant 163.00 feet to a point of curvature, thence bearing to th 
left with a curve of 7.87 feet radius distant 21.02 feet by the sideline of South Street to a point, 
thence S 54 degrees 03'06" W distant 142.45 feet by the westerly sideline of Lake Street to the point c 
beginning, all as shown on a plan entitled "Easement Plan of Land in Wilmington, Mass., Scale 1" = 40*, 
March 11, 1976, Whitman and Howard, Inc., Engineers & Architects, 89 Broad Street, Boston, Mass."; 
beginning at a point in the northerly sideline of Lake Street, said point being at a point of intersec- 
tion, thence N 29 degrees 29'55" W distant 178.00 feet by the westerly sideline of Silverhurst Avenue 
to a point of curvature, thence bearing to the right with a curve of 35.00 feet radius distant 49.33 
feet by the sideline of Silverhurst Avenue to a point of tangency, thence N 51 degrees 15' 20" E 
distant 162.28 feet by the northerly sideline of Silverhurst Avenue and across a right-of-way to a 
point, thence S 41 degrees 21 '20" E distant 81.51 feet by land of Lynch to a point, thence N 69 degrees 
50'00" E distant 470.81 feet by the northerly sideline of Dexter Street to a point of curvature, thence 
bearing to the left with a curve of 25.00 feet radius distant 35.85 feet by said sideline to a point of 
tangency, thence S 12 degrees 20' 10" E distant 62.18 feet by the westerly sideline of Main Street to a 
point, thence S 69 degrees 50'00" W distant 493.05 feet by the southerly sideline of Dexter Street and 
across land of Gilhooly to a point, thence N 41 degrees 21*20" W distant 102.57 feet through land of 
Gilhooly and Kendall to a point, thence S 51 degrees 15' 20" W distant 142.94 feet by the southerly side 
line of Silverhurst Avenue to a point of curvature, thence bearing to the left with a curve of 20.00 
feet radius distant 28.19 feet by the sideline of Silverhurst Avenue to a point of tangency, thence S 
29 degrees 29*55" E distant 183.00 feet by the easterly sideline of Silverhurst Avenue to a point, 
thence S 78 degrees 56*11" W distant 15.81 feet by the northerly sideline of Lake Street to the point 
of beginning, substantially as shown on a plan entitled "Easement Plan of Land in Wilmington, Mass., 
Scale 1" = 40', March 15, 1976, Whitman and Howard, Inc., Engineers & Architects, 89 Broad Street, 
Boston, Mass."; beginning at a point in the easterly sideline of Main Street, said point being at the 
Wilmington-Tewksbury town line, thence N 41 degrees 39' 12" E distant 38.33 feet by said town line to a 



104 



RTICLE 16. (continued) 

point, thence N 73 degrees 05' 10" E distant 367.15 feet by the northerly sideline of Winter Street to 
a point of curvature, thence bearing to the left with a curve of 100.00 feet radius distant 57.21 feet 
by the northerly sideline of Falcon Road to a point of tangency, thence N 40 degrees 18' 16" E distant 
266.47 feet by said sideline to a point, thence S 53 degrees 48'49" E distant 40.10 feet by the end line 
of Falcon Road to a point, thence S 40 degrees 18' 16" W distant 185.65 feet by the southerly sideline of 
Falcon Road to a point of curvature, thence bearing to the left with a curve of 15.00 feet radius distant 
38.54 feet by the sideline of Falcon Road to a point of tangency, thence N 73 degrees 05 '10" E distant 
234.92 feet by the northerly sideline of Winter Street to a point, thence N 40 degrees 07 '35" E distant 
46.70 feet by said sideline to a point, thence S 49 degrees 52'25" E distant 195.00 feet by the easterly 
sideline of Beeching Avenue to a point of curvature, thence bearing to the left with a curve of 15.00 
feet radius distant 23.56 feet by the sideline of Beeching Avenue to a point of tangency, thence S 40 
degrees 07'35" W distant 60.00 feet by the northerly sideline of Marjorie Road to a point of curvature, 
thence bearing to the left with a curve of 15.00 feet radius distant 23.56 feet by the sideline of 
Beeching Avenue to a point of tangency, thence N 49 degrees 52' 25" W distant 150.00 feet by the westerly 
sideline of Beeching Avenue to a point of curvature, thence bearing to the left with a curve of 15.00 
feet radius distant 23.56 feet by the sideline of Winter Street to a point of tangency, thence S 40 
degrees 07'35" W distant 14.17 feet by the southerly sideline of Winter Street to a point of curvature, 
thence bearing to the right with a curve of 50.00 feet radius distant 28.76 feet by said sideline to a 
point, thence S 73 degrees 05' 10" W distant 753.95 feet by said sideline to a point of curvature, thence 
bearing to the left with a curve of 15.00 feet radius distant 23.03 feet by said sideline to a point of 
tangency, thence N 14 degrees 54 '00" W distant 34.51 feet by the easterly sideline of Main Street to the 
point of beginning, substantially as shown on a plan entitled "Easement Plan of Land in Wilmington, 
Mass., Scale 1" = 40', March 4, 1976, Whitman and Howard, Inc., Engineers & Architects, 89 Broad Street, 
Boston, Mass."; beginning at a point in the northerly sideline of Marjorie Road, said point being 
Easterly and distant 395.95 feet from the easterly terminus of a curve of 15.00 feet radius, thence N 
40 degrees 07' 35" E distant 130.00 feet by said sideline to a point, thence S 49 degrees 52' 25" E distant 
40.00 feet across Marjorie Road to a point, thence S 40 degrees 07 '35" W distant 130.00 feet by the 
southerly sideline of Marjorie Road to a point, thence N 49 degrees 52' 25" W distant 40.00 feet across 
Marjorie Road to the point of beginning, all as shown on said plan; beginning at a point in the southerly 
sideline of Marjorie Road, said point being the easterly terminus of a curve of 15.00 feet radius, thence 
bearing to the left with a curve of 15.00 feet radius distant 23.56 feet by the easterly sideline of 
Beeching Avenue to a point of tangency, thence S 49 degrees 52' 25" E distant 170.00 feet by said sideline 
to a point, thence S 40 degrees 07 '35" W distant 30.00 feet across Beeching Avenue to a point, thence N 
49 degrees 52' 25" W distant 170.00 feet by the westerly sideline of Beeching Avenue to a point of curva- 
ture, thence bearing to the left with a curve of 15.00 feet radius distant 23.56 feet by said sideline to 
a point of tangency, thence N 40 degrees 07' 35" E distant 60.00 feet by the southerly sideline of 
Marjorie Road to the point of beginning, all as shown on said plan; beginning at a point in the northerly 
sideline of Davis Road at the westerly sideline of Cedar Avenue, thence N 71 degrees 20' 10" E distant 
269.45 feet by the northerly sideline of Davis Road to a point, thence S 51 degrees 46 '20" E distant 
40.00 feet across Oakwood Road, thence S 38 degrees 13 '40" W distant 60.85 feet by the easterly sideline 
of Oakwood Road to a point, thence S 51 degrees 46' 20" E distant 220.00 feet by the northerly sideline of 
Reading Avenue to a point, thence S 38 degrees 13 '40" W distant 30.00 feet across Reading Avenue to a 
point, thence, N 51 degrees 46' 20" W distant 220.00 feet by the southerly sideline of Reading Avenue to 
a point, thence S 38 degrees 13'40" W distant 66.72 feet by the easterly sideline of Oakwood Road to a 
point, thence N 51 degrees 46' 20" W distant 40.00 feet across Oakwood Road to a point of curvature, 
thence bearing to the left with a curve of 25.07 feet radius distant 64.27 feet by the sideline of Davis 
I Road to a point of tangency, thence S 71 degrees 20' 10" W distant 123.78 feet by the southerly sideline 
of Davis Road to a point, thence N 18 degrees 39' 50" W distant 40.00 feet by the westerly sideline of 
Cedar Avenue to the point of beginning, all as shown on a plan entitled "Easement Plan of Land in 
Wilmington, Mass., Scale 1" = 40', March 5, 1976, Whitman and Howard, Inc., Engineers & Architects, 
89 Broad Street, Boston, Mass."; beginning at a point in the westerly sideline of Oakwood Road, said 
point being southerly and distant 276.94 feet from the westerly sideline of Cedar Avenue, thence bearing 
to the left with a curve of 25.58 feet radius distant 65.58 feet by the sideline of Maple Road to a 
point of tangency, thence S 71 degrees 20' 10" W distant 265.94 feet by the southerly sideline of Maple 
Road to a point, thence N 16 degrees 39' 00" W distant 40.03 feet by the easterly sideline of Main Street 
to a point, thence N 71 degrees 20' 10" E distant 411.94 feet by the northerly sideline of Maple Road to 
a point, thence S 38 degrees 13'40" W distant 159.29 feet by the westerly sideline of Oakwood Road to 
the point of beginning, all as shown on said plan; beginning at a point in the easterly sideline of 
Main Street, said point being southerly and distant 300.15 feet from the southerly terminus of a curve 
of 1027.57 feet radius, thence N 67 degrees 40' 00" E distant 56.44 feet through land of Zampese to a 
point, thence N 27 degrees 13 '58" E distant 99.37 feet by land of Zampese to a point, thence N 05 degrees 



105 



ARTICLE 16. (continued) 

14' 51" E distant 251.03 feet through land of Zampese and Eaton to a point, thence S 78 degrees 43' 30" 
E distant 20.11 feet by the southerly sideline of Glen Road to a point, thence S 05 degrees 14' 51" W 
distant 252.81 feet through land of Eaton and Joyce to a point, thence S 27 degrees 13' 58" W distant 
110.62 feet through land of Joyce and Kahn to a point, thence S 67 degrees 40' 00" W distant 64.77 feet 
through land of Kahn and Zampese to a point, thence N 19 degrees 34' 30" W distant 20.02 feet by the 
easterly sideline of Main Street to the point of beginning, substantially as shown on a plan entitled 
"Easement Plan of Land in Wilmington, Mass., Scale 1" = 40', March 8, 1976, Whitman and Howard, Inc., 
Engineers & Architects, 89 Broad Street, Boston, Mass."; beginning at a point in the northerly sideline 
of Everett Avenue, at the easterly sideline of Faulkner Avenue, thence S 51 degrees 46' 20" E distant 
495.31 feet by the northerly sideline of Everett Avenue to a point, thence S 38 degrees 13 '40" W 
distant 40.00 feet across Everett Avenue to a point, thence N 51 degrees 46' 20" W distant 465.39 feet 
by the southerly sideline of Everett Avenue to a point, thence N 33 degrees 49' 20" E distant 10.03 feet 
by said sideline to a point, thence N 51 degrees 46' 20" W distant 29.15 feet by said sideline to a 
point, thence N 38 degrees 13 '40" E distant 30.00 feet by the easterly sideline of Faulkner Avenue to 
the point of beginning, all as shown on a plan entitled "Easement Plan of Land in Wilmington, Mass., 
Scale 1" =40', March 2, 1976, Whitman and Howard, Inc., Engineers & Architects, 89 Broad Street, 
Boston, Mass."; beginning at a point in the westerly sideline of Cunningham Street at the southerly 
sideline of Beeching Avenue, thence S 51 degrees 46' 20" E distant 30.00 feet by the southerly sideline 
of Beeching Avenue to a point, thence S 38 degrees 13 '40" W distant 200.00 feet by the easterly side- 
line of Cunningham Street to a point, thence N 51 degrees 46' 20" W distant 30.00 feet by the northerly 
sideline of Everett Avenue to a point, thence N 38 degrees 13'40" E distant 200.00 feet by the westerly 
sideline of Cunningham Street to the point of beginning, substantially as shown on said plan; beginning 
at a point in the southerly sideline of Beeching Avenue at the westerly sideline of Faulkner Avenue, 
thence N 51 degrees 46' 20" W distant 435.00 feet by the southerly sideline of Beeching Avenue to a 
point, thence N 38 degrees 13'40" E distant 30.00 feet across Beeching Avenue to a point, thence S 
51 degrees 46' 20" E distant 435.00 feet by the northerly sideline of Beeching Avenue to a point, thence 
S 38 degrees 13'40" W distant 30.00 feet by the westerly sideline of Faulkner Avenue to the point of 
beginning, all as shown on said plan; beginning at a point in the southerly sideline of Sudbury Avenue 
at the westerly sideline of Cunningham Street, thence N 51 degrees 46' 20" W distant 450.00 feet by the 
southerly sideline of Sudbury Avenue to a point, thence N 38 degrees 13 '40" E distant 30.00 feet by the 
easterly sideline of Faulkner Avenue to a point, thence S 51 degrees 46 '20" E distant 450.00 feet by 
the northerly sideline of Sudbury Avenue to a point, thence S 38 degrees 13'40" W distant 30.00 feet 
by the westerly sideline of Cunningham Street to the point of beginning, all as shown on a plan entitle 
"Easement Plan of Land in Wilmington, Mass., Scale 1" = 40', March 3, 1976, Whitman and Howard, Inc., 
Engineers & Architects, 89 Broad Street, Boston, Mass."; beginning at a point in the southerly sideline 
of Allston Avenue at the westerly sideline of Cunningham Street, thence N 51 degrees 46' 20" W distant 
450.00 feet by the southerly sideline of Allston Avenue to a point, thence N 38 degrees 13'40" E distar 
30.00 feet by the easterly sideline of Faulkner Avenue to a point, thence S 51 degrees 46' 20" E distant 
450.00 feet by the northerly sideline of Allston Avenue to a point, thence S 38 degrees 13'40" W distar 
30.00 feet to the point of beginning, all as shown on said plan; beginning at a point in the easterly 
sideline of Cunningham Street, said point being at the terminus of a curve of 40.00 feet radius, thence 
bearing to the left with a curve of 40.00 feet radius distant 62.83 feet by the sideline of Lexington 
Street to a point, thence S 67 degrees 33' 50" E distant 334.17 feet by the northerly sideline of 
Lexington Street and land of Stallings to a point, thence N 30 degrees 52'00" E distant 125.74 feet 
by land of Stallings to a point, thence S 82 degrees 58' 26" E distant 146.51 feet by land of the Town 
of Wilmington Conservation Commission to a point, thence S 0? degrees 01' 34" W distant 155.00 feet by 
the easterly sideline of Pilcher Drive to a point of curvature, thence bearing to the left with a curve 
of 25.00 feet radius distant 39.27 feet by the sideline of Gearty Street to a point of tangency, thence 
S 82 degrees 58' 26" E distant 577.00 feet by the northerly sideline of Gearty Street to a point of 
curvature, thence bearing to the left with a curve of 25.00 feet radius distant 39.27 feet by the side 
line of Gearty Street to a point of tangency, thence S 07 degrees 01 '34" W distant 100.00 feet by the 
westerly sideline of Ring Avenue to a point of curvature, thence bearing to the left with a curve of 
25.00 feet radius distant 39.27 feet by the sideline of Gearty Street to a point of tangency, thence 
N 82 degrees 58' 26" W distant 577.00 feet by the southerly sideline of Gearty Street to a point of 
curvature, thence bearing to the left with a curve of 25.00 feet radius distant 39.27 feet by the side 
line of Gearty Street to a point of tangency, thence N 82 degrees 58' 26" W distant 50.00 feet across 
Pilcher Drive to a point, thence N 07 degrees 01' 34" E distant 130.00 feet by the westerly sideline of 
Pilcher Drive to a point, thence N 82 degrees 58*26" W distant 117.13 feet by land of Nu-Ty Realty Corp^ 
to a point, thence S 67 degrees 50 '47" W distant 53.32 feet through land of Nu-Ty Realty Corp. to a 
point, thence N 67 degrees 33' 50" W distant 368.23 feet through land of Lezberg and by the southerly 
sideline of Lexington Street to a point, thence N 22 degrees 26' 10" E distant 80.00 feet by the easterl 
sideline of Cunningham Street to the point of beginning, substantially as shown on a plan entitled 



106 



ARTICLE 16. (continued) 

"Plan of Land in Wilmington, Mass., Scale 1" = 40', March 9, 1976, Whitman and Howard, Inc., Engineers 
& Architects, 89 Broad Street, Boston, Mass."; beginning at a point in the northerly sideline of Salem 
Street, said point being westerly and distant 83.58 feet from the easterly terminus of a curve of 
532.16 feet radius, thence N 24 degrees 12' 54" E distant 200.56 feet by land of Peterson to a point, 
thence N 52 degrees 56' 55" E distant 606.90 feet through land of the Town of Wilmington to a point, 
thence N 07 degrees 00' 55" E distant 1085.16 feet through said land to a point, thence N 01 degrees 
57 '13" E distant 299.35 feet through said land to a point, thence N 00 degrees 26 '45" W distant 297.40 

I feet through said land to a point, thence N 06 degrees 26' 34" E distant 310.70 feet through land of 
Town of Wilmington and Kunigenas to a point, thence S 82 degrees 58' 03" E distant 175.60 feet through 
land of Kunigenas, the Boston and Maine Railroad Corporation - Debtor and/or the Massachusetts Bay 
Transportation Authority and the Town of Wilmington to a point, thence N 07 degrees 00' 29" E distant 
3097.23 feet through land of the Town of Wilmington and Lewis Realty Trust to a point, thence N 52 
degrees 56' 21" E distant 150.61 feet through land of Lewis Realty Trust to a point, thence S 37 degrees 
10' 34" E distant 20.00 feet by the westerly sideline of Interstate Route 93 to a point, thence S 52 
degrees 56' 21" W distant 142.18 feet through land of Lewis Realty Trust to a point, thence S 07 degrees 
00' 29" W distant 3108.77 feet through land of Lewis Realty Trust and the Town of Wilmington to a point, 
thence, N 82 degrees 58' 03" W distant 175.40 feet through land of Town of Wilmington, Boston and Maine 
Railroad Corporation - Debtor and/or the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority and Kunigenas, 
thence S 06 degrees 26 '34" W distant 289.29 feet through land of Kunigenas and the Town of Wilmington 
to a point, thence S 00 degrees 26 '45" E distant 296.61 feet, through land of the Town of Wilmington to 
a point, thence S 01 degrees 57 '13" W distant 300.66 feet through said land to a point, thence S 07 
degrees 00' 55" W distant 1094.52 feet through said land to a point, thence S 52 degrees 56 '55" W distant 
610.25 feet through said land to a point, thence S 24 degrees 12' 54" W distant 198.24 feet through land 
of the Town of Wilmington and Buonopane to a point, thence bearing to the left with a curve of 532.16 
feet radius distant 20.20 feet by the northerly sideline of Salem Street to the point of beginning, all 
as shown on a plan entitled "Easement Plan of Land in Wilmington, Mass., Scale 1" = 40', April 28, 1976, 
Whitman and Howard, Inc., Engineers & Architects, 45 William Street, Wellesley, Mass."; beginning at a 
point in the easterly sideline of Interstate Route 93 said point being southerly and distant 883.71 
feet from the southerly terminus of a curve of 9850.00 feet radius, thence N 34 degrees 53 '40" W distant 
883.71 feet by said sideline to a point of curvature, thence bearing to the right with a curve of 

19850.00 feet radius distant 328.30 feet by said sideline to a point, thence N 06 degrees 27 '47" E 
distant 273.38 feet through land of Gargiulo & Holian to a point, thence N 84 degrees 59' 35" E distant 
1035.14 feet by land of Georgia-Pacific to a point, thence S 10 degrees 27'40" E distant 12.90 feet by 
the westerly sideline of Ballardvale Street to a point of curvature, thence bearing to the left with a 
curve of 2944.16 feet radius distant 7.19 feet by said sideline to a point, thence S 84 degrees 59'35" 
W distant 1020.71 feet through land of Gargiulo & Holian to a point, thence S 06 degrees 27 '47" W 
distant 249.86 feet through said land to a point, thence bearing to the left with a curve of 9830.00 
feet radius distant 320.47 feet through said land to a point of tangency, thence S 34 degrees 53'40" E 
distant 897.41 feet through said land to a point, thence S 89 degrees 30' 30" W distant 24.27 feet by 
land of Leto to the point of beginning, all as shown on said plan, with each easement on each parcel of 
land containing an area as shown on said plans, together with temporary construction easements sub- 
stantially as shown on said plans, copies of which are on file in the office of the Town Engineer; or 
do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee recommended approval. Planning Board recommended 
approval and so reported to the Town Meeting. 

lotion by Mr. Arnold C. Blake, member of the Water and Sewer Commissioners: "I move that the Town vote to 
luthorize. .here the Moderator interrupted to ask Mr. Blake if his motion followed the article word for word; 
:he answer was yes - the motion was put and so voted unanimously. 

iRTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to petition the State Legisla- 
;ure to allow the following list of Traffic Supervisors to take the Civil Service Police entrance examination 
:or the position of police woman, notwithstanding that said listed individuals are more than thirty-two 
ears old; namely, Raffaela Zaccagnini, Patricia Gately, Cecile Marini, Margaret Duffy, Mary Lynch, Joanne 
radley, Patricia Robarge, Carole Bailey, Barbara La Fave, Jeannette Davidson, Maureen McHugh, Marilyn Fuller, 
■arbara Knickle, Mary Kuchler, Rosemarie Morgan, Frances Dec, Evelyn Grassia, Margaret Stewart, Patricia 
ohnson and Mary Harvey, or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee recommended disapproval. 

'.otion by Mr. James Miceli, Selectman, was read to the Town Meeting exactly as laid out in the above Article 
7. The Moderator put the vote to the meeting and declared that the "ayes" have it. So voted. 

RTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of Wilmington by deleting 
ection III-l A.9.b. and substitute the following: 



107 



ARTICLE 18. (continued) 

"Section III-l.A.9.b. Non-commercial keeping of animals, livestock, and poultry for personal or house 
hold use, subject to regulations of the Board of Health; provided the same shall not be injurious, 
noxious, offensive or detrimental to a residential neighborhood. A "kennel" being one pack or collec- 
tion of dogs on a single premises, whether maintained for breeding, boarding, sale, training, hunting 
or other purposes and including any shop where dogs are on sale, and also including every pack or col- 
lection of more than three dogs, three months old or over owned or kept by a person on a single premis 
irrespective of the purpose for which they are maintained are specifically 'not permitted';" or do any 
thing in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. A. Daniel Gillis: "I move that the Town vote to amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of 

Wilmington by deleting Section III-l A.9.b. and substitute the following: 

Section III-l. A.9.b Non-commercial keeping of animals, livestock, and poultry for personal or house- 
hold use, subject to regulations of the Board of Health; provided the same shall not be injurious, 
noxious, offensive or detrimental to a residential neighborhood. A "kennel" being one pack or collec- 
tion of dogs on a single premises, whether maintained for breeding, boarding, sale, training, hunting 
or other purposes and including any shop where dogs are on sale, and also including every pack or col- 
lection of more than three dogs, three months old or over, owned or kept by a person on a single prerai 
irrespective of the purpose for which they are maintained are specifically 'not permitted'." 

Finance Committee recommended approval. Planning Board reported approval. 

Motion to postpone was lost. After a lengthy debate the question was called for Yes-239 No-13. Motion 
carries to cut off debate. Action on the motion by standing Yes -178 No-67 . Motion carries and so de- 
clared by the Moderator, as amended. 

Motion to adjourn to Saturday, March 19, 1977, in the High School Gymnasium at 1:30 p.m. This motion also 
included the reconsideration of the dog officer's salary, as stated by Mr. Callan. 

Adjourned at 11:15 p.m. 

Number of voters checked in: Afternoon 563 

Evening 378 

The Town Clerk posted a Legal Notice of the adjourned Annual Town Meeting on March 14, 1977, as follows: 

The adjourned Annual Town Meeting will reconvene on Saturday, March 19, 1977, at 1:30 p.m. at the High 
School Gymnasium, Church Street, Wilmington, Massachusetts. 

You are also notified that the following item will be reconsidered at this meeting: 
Under Article #5 (Budget) line item - Dog Officer's Salary. 

Attest: (Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 

Town Clerk 

Wilmington, Massachusetts 

The above notice was posted in six (6) conspicuous places in the town - Wilmington Town Hall, Tattersals 
Store, Elias' Market, U. S. Post Office, Lucci's Market and the Town Memorial Library, all within the Town 
of Wilmington. 

Attest: (Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 

Town Clerk 

The meeting was called to order by Mr. Callan at 1:50 p.m., there being a quorum present. 

The Moderator asked that the Toxra Clerk note that this meeting was properly posted. Mrs. Barbara Sullivan 
asked that the Town Meeting consider minority reports that were presented at such meetings and that they be 
given proper consideration. Mrs. Sullivan presented a resolution for the Selectmen and Moderator to set up 
a study committee and come up with a method of presenting such reports. 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Revised By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of 
Wilmington by deleting in its entirety Chapter 5, Section 29, and inserting in its place the following: 
Chapter 5, Section 29A, Restraint and Control. 

It shall be unlawful for the owner or keeper of any dog to permit any such animal to run loose or to b 



108 



ARTICLE 19. (continued) 

at large within the corporate limits of the Town of Wilmington. All dogs found any place other than on 
the premises of the owner or keeper shall be deemed to be running loose or to be at large within the 
meaning of this section, except such dogs that may be under control by means of a chain or leash, not 
longer than six (6) feet or those that may be in any vehicle or boat, while so therein shall be deemed 
to be under personal control of owner or keeper thereof. 
Chapter 5, Section 29B. Confinement and Notice. 

Any dog found to be at large in violation of this Town by-law shall be apprehended and confined by the 
dog officer or any police officer who shall forthwith serve upon the owner or keeper of said dog, in 
hand or by leaving at the last and usual place of abode of said owner or keeper a citation that shall 
state (1) that such violation has been committed; (2) the time and place of such violation; (3) that 
such violation will be referred to the district court for prosecution in accordance with General Laws, 
Chapter 140, Section 173A; (4) that said dog shall be turned over to a Humane Society. In no case shall 
a dog be sold or delivered to any person or organization intending to use said dog for vivisection 
purposes . 

Chapter 5, Section 29C. Penalty. 

After a complaint has been made to the Dog Officer, the owner or keeper found in violation of this Sec- 
tion will be liable to a fine of $10.00 for the first offense and $25.00 for subsequent offenses as 
provided in the General Laws, Chapter 140, Section 136A-175; or do anything in relation thereto. 
Finance Committee recommended disapproval. 

Motion by Mr. Joseph Balestrieri, Dog Officer: "I move that the Town vote to amend the Revised By-Laws of 
the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington by deleting in its entirety Chapter 5, Section 29, and inserting 
in its place the following: Mr. Callan, Moderator, asked the maker of the motion if the article and the 
motion followed exactly and Mr. Balestrieri said it did with the exception of a missing word in Chapter 5, 
Section 29C. Penalty. Following the words Dog Officer, the word 'the' should be added, so that it would 
read 'the owner or keeper'. Motion as set out in Article 19 above with the amendment was so voted. Main 
motion as amended was voted. Yes-llO No-86 Moderator declared the motion carried by a majority vote. 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of acquir- 
ing a Security and Detection System for the Wilmington Memorial Library, and determine how the same shall 
be raised, whether by taxation, transfer from available funds or otherwise; or do anything in relation 
thereto. Finance Committee recommended disapproval. 

Motion by Mr. Philip Buzzell: "I move that the Town raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of twenty- 
two thousand dollars for the purpose of acquiring a Security and Detection system for the Wilmington Memorial 
Library." Standing vote taken Yes-106 No-156 Motion lost. 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of install- 
ing a water main from Jewel Drive to the top of Cook Hill at Cook Avenue, a distance of 1100 feet + -, of 
not less than six inches, notwithstanding the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 42G to 421 
inclusive as voted at the Town Meeting held on March 21, 1956, and to further authorize the Board of Water 
and Sewer Commissioners to take by eminent domain, to purchase or accept as a gift such easements as are 
necessary to effectuate the purpose of this article; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. A. Daniel Gillis to adopt the above Article 21 and to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum 
of $26,000 for said purpose. Finance Committee recommended disapproval. 

Since Articles 21 and 22 were related, the Moderator allowed the meeting to discuss both articles at the same 
time. After much discussion a standing vote was taken Yes-70 No-137 Motion Lost. 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of install- 
ing water service lines at the top of Cook Hill on unaccepted streets and ways now or hereafter existent 
being an undetermined distance of not less than two-inch size pipe, in accordance with the provisions of 
General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 42G to 421 inclusive as voted at the Town Meeting held on March 21, 1956, 
and to further authorize the Board of Water and Sewer Commissioners to take by eminent domain, to purchase or 
accept as a gift such easements as are necessary to effectuate the purpose of this article; or do anything in 
relation thereto. Finance Committee recommended disapproval. 

Motion by Mr. James Banda: "I move to pass over this article and take no action thereon." So voted. 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of con- 
structing a sidewalk or footpath along Glen Road and determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether 



109 



ARTICLE 23. (continued) 

by taxation or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or otherwise for said construction; or do any- 
thing in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Aldo Caira: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of 
$135,000 for the purpose of constructing a sidewalk or footpath along Glen Road." Finance Committee rec- 
ommended disapproval. The Planning Board recommended approval of this article in their report to the Town 
Meeting. After much argument the Moderator said we will vote on $135,000 by taxation. Yes-171 No-83 
Motion carries and so declared by the Moderator. 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to acquire land for con- 
servation purposes as authorized by Chapter 40 Section 8C of the Massachusetts General Laws, said land to be 
managed by the Conservation Commission; and to authorize the Selectmen to purchase, take by eminent domain, 
receive as a gift, or execute an option for a certain parcel of land bound and described as follows: 

Beginning at a point in the northerly sideline of Burlington Avenue, said point being the westerly ter- 
minus of a curve of 577.18 feet radius, thence N 83 degrees 17'52" W distant 25.11 feet by said sideliri 
to a point, thence N 11 degrees 05' 29" E distant 215.09 feet by the sideline of land of Duma to a point 
thence N 78 degrees 54'31" W distant 194.77 feet by the rear line of land of Duma to a point, thence 
N 02 degrees 45*40" E distant 125.00 feet by land of DuBois to a point, thence N 77 degrees 16' 20" W 
distant 64.82 feet by said land to a point, thence S 33 degrees 05' 50" W distant 51.29 feet by said 
land to a point, thence N 57 degrees 27 ' 14" W distant 177.48 feet by land of Coyne and Gangi to a point 
thence N 07 degrees 53 '17" W distant 90.73 feet by land of Stemmler to a point, thence N 85 degrees 
13'45" E distant 73.56 feet by land of Rando to a point, thence N 84 degrees 59' 53" E distant 69.62 
feet by said land to a point, thence N 86 degrees 16'47" E distant 86.45 feet by said land to a point, 
thence N 03 degrees 00'41" W distant 69.59 feet by said land to a point, thence N 09 degrees 26'47" E 
distant 63.31 feet by said land to a point, thence N 01 degrees 38'41" E distant 102.15 feet by said 
land to a point, thence N 19 degrees 11'30" W distant 36.91 feet by said land to a point, thence N 
07 degrees 07' 20" W distant 51.22 feet by said land to a point, thence N 15 degrees 43'36" W distant 
23.06 feet by said land to a point, thence N 08 degrees 10'45" E distant 24.79 feet by land of Logan 
to a point, thence N 24 degrees 55*11" E distant 168.35 feet by said land to a point, thence N 16 
degrees 23*07" E distant 120.78 feet by said land to a point, thence N 09 degrees 12*31*' E distant 
43.20 feet by said land to a point, thence N 19 degrees 21*07" E distant 58.22 feet by said land to a 
point, thence N 20 degrees 55*02" E distant 182.05 feet by land of the Town of Wilmington to a point, 
thence N 20 degrees 21*18" E distant 134.19 feet by said land to a point, thence N 20 degrees 30'23" 
E distant 190.36 feet by said land to a point, thence N 20 degrees 34 '59" E distant 207.49 feet by 
said land to a point, thence S 50 degrees 35 '10" E distant 122.64 feet by land of the Town of Wilming 
Birch Road and Fritsch to a point, thence S 49 degrees 39'23** E distant 151.18 feet by land of Fritsch 
to a point, thence S 49 degrees 58*47" E distant 134.58 feet by said land to a point, thence S 51 
degrees 04'32" E distant 80.31 feet by land of Fritsch and Arditto to a point, thence S 49 degrees 26' 
56" E distant 46.70 feet by land of Arditto to a point, thence S 53 degrees 39*20" E distant 84.65 
feet by said land to a point, thence S 87 degrees 22*54" E distant 147.95 feet by said land to a point 
thence S 88 degrees 35*50" E distant 191.65 feet by said land to a point, thence S 86 degrees 30*51" E 
distant 39.42 feet by said land to a point, thence S 86 degrees 12*14" E distant 114.54 feet by said 
land to a point, thence S 86 degrees 39*18" E distant 172.18 feet by land of Arditto, Gates and Ivy 
Court to a point, thence S 06 degrees 09*34" E distant 50,75 feet by Ivy Court and land of Baksys to a 
point, thence S 01 degrees 57*45" E distant 81.99 feet by land of Baksys to a point, thence S 06 degret 
44*31** W distant 96.31 feet by land of Baksys, Williamson, and Forbes to a point, thence S 07 degrees 
46*10** W distant 138.70 feet by land of Forbes to a point, thence S 11 degrees 07*08" W distant 135.72 
feet by land of Forbes and Beech Court to a point, thence S 15 degrees 02*05*' W distant 80.13 feet by 
Beech Court and land of Lake to a point, thence S 09 degrees 23*30" W distant 123.04 feet by land of 
Lake and land of Johnson to a point, thence S 30 degrees 16*09" E distant 51.89 feet by land of Johnsoi 
to a point, thence S 22 degrees 58*57** E distant 42.70 feet by land of Johnson to a point, thence S 

04 degrees 24' 22" W distant 75.73 feet by land of Johnson and Oak Court to a point, thence S 28 degrees 
02' 38" W distant 79.19 feet by land of White to a point, thence S 36 degrees 58' 35" W distant 400.11 
feet by land of White to a point, thence S 36 degrees 26 '31" W distant 97.28 feet by said land to a 
point, thence S 08 degrees 27 '05" E distant 75.90 feet by said land to a point, thence S 16 degrees 
22 '36" E distant 86.84 feet by land of White and the Wilmington Housing Authority to a point, thence 

5 02 degrees 30' 32" E distant 23.30 feet by land of the Wilmington Housing Authority to a point, theno 
S 15 degrees 13'03" E distant 32.41 feet by said land to a point, thence S 14 degrees 57*23" E distant 
179.86 feet by said land to a point, thence S 27 degrees 18' 35" E distant 163.77 feet by said land to i 
point, thence S 11 degrees 21'16" W distant 191.69 feet by said land to a point, thence S 14 degrees 
12' 29" W distant 28.32 feet by said land to a point, thence S 17 degrees 20' 02" W distant 35.88 feet bj 
said land to a point, thence S 37 degrees 39' 58" W distant 46.92 feet by said land to a point, thence 



110 



ARTICLE 24. (continued) 

S 38 degrees 56'42" W distant 44.85 feet by land of Keough to a point, thence N 78 degrees 32' 28" W 
distant 40.02 feet by said land to a point, thence N 74 degrees 58' 27" W distant 32.01 feet by said land 
to a point, thence N 56 degrees 36' 10" W distant 56.95 feet by said land to a point, thence N 55 degrees 
30'24" W distant 38.97 feet by land of Huntley to a point, thence N 50 degrees 47 ' 06" W distant 81.73 
feet by said land to a point, thence S 61 degrees 44'36" W distant 121.20 feet by said land to a point, 
thence N 31 degrees 46' 30" W distant 60.46 feet by the northerly sideline of Burlington Avenue to a 
point, thence N 58 degrees 13' 30" E distant 230.00 feet by land of Pierce to a point, thence N 12 
degrees 53'04" E distant 149.11 feet by said land to a point, thence N 65 degrees 21'15" W distant 
335.93 feet by land of Pierce and DelTorto to a point, thence S 37 degrees 41' 17" W distant 173.41 feet 
by land of DelTorto to a point, thence bearing to the left with a curve of 971.52 feet radius distant 
125.13 feet by the northerly sideline of Burlington Avenue to a point, thence N 40 degrees 13'48" E 
distant 195.00 feet by land of Patenaude to a point, thence N 49 degrees 46*12" W distant 95.33 feet by 
said land to a point, thence N 42 degrees 05' 36" E distant 131.24 feet by land of Comerford to a point, 
thence N 11 degrees 05' 29" E distant 40.00 feet by said land to a point, thence N 46 degrees 37 '17" W 
distant 202.08 feet by said land to a point, thence N 87 degrees 14' 22" W distant 155.00 feet by said 
land to a point, thence S 11 degrees 05 '29" W distant 132.13 feet by said land to a point, thence N 
78 degrees 54*31" W distant 35.00 feet by land of McDermott to a point, thence S 11 degrees 05' 29" W 
distant 35.00 feet by said land to a point, thence N 78 degrees 54*31" W distant 90.00 feet by said 
land to a point, thence S 11 degrees 05' 29" W distant 175.00 feet by said land to a point, thence bear- 
ing to the left with a curve of 577.18 feet radius distant 25.00 feet by the northerly sideline of 
Burlington Avenue to the point of beginning, being Lot Q containing 53.03 acres; all is shown on a plan 
entitled: "Compiled Plan of Land, Burlington Avenue, Wilmington, Mass., Scale 1" = 100', January 3, 
1977, Robert L. Higgins, Town Engineer, a copy of which is on file in the office of the Town Engineer; 
and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation or by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing, or otherwise; and to authorize the Conservation Commission to apply for assistance 
from the State and Federal governments; or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee rec- 
ommended disapproval. 

Motion by Mr. James Miceli: "I move that Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $115,000 
to acquire land for conservation purposes as authorized by Chapter 40, Section 8C of the Massachusetts 
General Laws, said land to be managed by the Conservation Commission; and to authorize the Selectmen to 
purchase a certain parcel of land bound and described as follows: Mr. Callan, Moderator, interrupted 
Mr. Miceli to ask if the motion followed the article exactly and the answer was yes. After a great deal of 
discussion the question was called for. Yes-218 No-6 voted to cut off debate. Vote on the question 
Yes-106 No-117 Motion lost. The Planning Board reported to the meeting that at first they voted dis- 
approval - after reconsideration, they now recommended the purchase. 

At this point in the meeting Mr. Joseph Balestrieri asked the Town to reconsider his salary - a line item in 
the budget. Motion to reconsider lost by a voice vote. 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to abandon its right, title, or interest in all or any part of a 
drain easement at 44 North Street granted to the Town on August 12, 1963, as shown on a plan known as Plan 
of Drainage Easement on North Street, Plan Book 98, Plan 169; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to raise and appropriate $50 to abandon its right, title or 
interest in all or any part of a drain easement at 44 North Street granted to the Town on August 12, 1963, as 
shown on a plan known as Plan of Drainage Easement on North Street", Plan Book 98, Plan 169." So voted. 
Finance Committee recommended approval of $50. Planning Board reported to the meeting their approval of this 
motion. 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to amend the By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington 

by adding a new section to Chapter 3; namely. Section 25, as follows: 

The Selectmen shall appoint a Board of Appeals under the provisions of Chapter 41, Section 81Z of the 
General Laws, for the purpose of hearing and acting upon appeals under the provisions of Chapter 41, 
Section 81E through 81H, inclusive, Official Map; or do anything else in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. James Miceli: "I move that the Town vote to amend the Revised By-Laws of the Inhabitants of 
'the Town of Wilmington by adding a new section to Chapter 3; namely. Section 25 as follows: 

"The Selectmen shall appoint a Board of Appeals under the provisions of Chapter 41, Section 81Z of the 
General Laws for the purpose of hearing and acting upon appeals under the provisions of Chapter 41, 
Sections 8lE through 81H, inclusive. Official Map." 



Ill 



ARTICLE 26, (continued) 

Finance Committee recommended disapproval. Planning Board reported approval. 

Amendment by Mr. Simon Cutter - by adding after the word 'appoint' the words 'the present Board of Appeals to 
be the Board of Appeals' under the provisions of Chapter 41, Section 81Z. Amendment so voted. Main motion 
as amended so voted. 

Mr. Belbin asked for reconsideration of Article #23. Voice vote declared lost. Vote doubted. Standing 
Yes-59 No-106 Lost. 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Chapter 808 of the Acts of 1975 and 
amend the Zoning By-Law in the following manner to bring it into conformance therewith, to wit: 

SECTION I-l. INTENT AND PURPOSE, delete in its entirety and insert in its place: 

The purpose of this By-Law is to achieve the objectives of "The Zoning Act," Chapter 40A, G.L. as amende 
as presented in Section 2A of Chapter 808 of the Acts of 1975, which include the following: to con- 
serve health; to secure safety from fire, flood, panic and other dangers; to provide adequate light and 
air; to prevent overcrowding of land, to avoid undue concentration of population; to conserve natural re 
sources; to facilitate the adequate provision of water, water supply, drainage, sewerage, parks, open 
space and other public requirements; to prevent blight and pollution of the environment; to preserve and 
increase amenitites and to encourage the most appropriate use of land throughout the Town. This By-Law 
is adopted for this purpose under the authority provided by, and in accordance with the provisions of 
Chapter 40A of the General Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, as amended. 

SECTION II. DEFINITIONS, 

3. delete the word (constitutes) in the second line and insert the following: 
is agriculture, horticulture, or floriculture, including 

SECTION III-l. USES IN RURAL, SINGLE RESIDENCE A AND SINGLE RESIDENCE B DISTRICTS, 

B. delete the words (are permitted as authorized on appeal by the Board of Appeals and) and insert in i 
their place: 

may be permitted by special permit 

SECTION III-2. USES IN NEIGHBORHOOD BUSINESS DISTRICTS, 

B. delete the words (are permitted as authorized on appeal by the Board of Appeal and) and insert in 
their place: 

may be permitted by special permit 

SECTION III-3. USES IN GENERAL BUSINESS DISTRICTS, 

A. 3.C. delete the words (,but shall be constructed in accordance with the standards specified in the 
Town Building By-Law in Division No. 2 DEFINITIONS for 'First-Class Building') ! 

B. delete the words, (are permitted as authorized on appeal by the Board of Appeals and), and insert ir 
their place: 

may be permitted by special permit 

SECTION III-4. USES IN INDUSTRIAL DISTRICTS, 

A. 8. delete the words, (on appeal by the Board of Appeals) and insert in their place: 
by special permit 

B. delete the words, (are permitted as authorized on appeal by the Board of Appeals and), and insert in 
their place: 

may be permitted by special permit 

SECTION III-5. USES IN HIGH DENSITY TRAFFIC BUSINESS DISTRICTS, 

B. delete the words, (are permitted as authorized on appeal by the Board of Appeals and), and insert ir 
their place: 

may be permitted by special permit 

SECTION III-6. USES IN A FLOOD PLAIN DISTRICT, 

B. delete the words, (are permitted as authorized by appeal by the Board of Appeals and), insert in 
their place: 

may be permitted by special permit 

C. delete in the third line the word (thirty), and insert in its place: 
thirty-five (35) 

112 



VRTICLE 27. (continued) 
SECTION IV-5. SIGNS, 

Item 3. Delete the words (may be of wood. Wall signs exceeding these dimensions shall be entirely of 

non-combustible material.) 

Item 4. Delete in its entirety. 

Item 6. Delete the words (all such signs shall be constructed entirely of metal or other non-combustible 
material including all braces and supports.) 

Item 7. Delete the numeral (7) and insert in its place the numeral 10 

SECTION V-2. HEIGHT, 

B. delete the words (the Board of Appeals) and insert in their place: 
special permit 

SECTION V-4. SET-BACK AND YARDS, 

D. delete the words, (the Board of Appeals), and insert in their place: 
special permit 

SECTION VI-1. NON-CONFORMING USES 

A. delete the words and numeral (one (1) year) and insert in their place: 
two (2) years 

B. and C. delete the words, (the Board of Appeals) and insert in their place the words: 
special permit 

Change the capital letters C, D and E and insert a new paragraph which reads as follows: 
B. Any construction or operations allowed by a building permit or special permit shall conform to any 
subsequent amendment of this By-Law unless the use or construction is commenced within a period of not 
less than six (6) months after the issuance of the permit. 

SECTION VI -2. TEMPORARY USES, 

delete in the second line of the first paragraph the words (the Board of Appeals) and insert in their 
place: 

special permit 

SECTION VII. DUMPING AND FILLING, 

delete the words (authorization on appeals by the Board of Appeals. The Board of Appeals shall grant no 

such authorization) and insert in their place: 

a special permit. No special permit shall be granted 

delete the words (as inserted by Chapter 310 of the Acts of 1955) 

SECTION VIII-2.B. PERMIT APPLICATIONS, 

delete the words (for exception) in lines 1, 3, 8, and 14; 

delete the words in quotation marks on line 16 ("on appeal by the Board of Appeals") and insert in their 
place: 

"may be permitted by special permit" 

SECTION VIII-3. VIOLATIONS AND PENALTIES, 
B. Violation Penalty 

delete the word and figure, (fifty ($50)) and Insert in their place: 
one hundred ($100) 

SECTION VIII -4. BOARD OF APPEALS, 

A. Established: 

Insert in the first line after the words. Board of Appeals, the words: 
and associate members thereof. 

In the second line, delete the words (and under Division 1, Section 7 of) and insert in their place: 
Chapter 40A of the General Laws, as amended, and 

B. General Powers and Duties 

Delete in its entirety and insert in its place the following: 
B . Powers 

The Board of Appeals shall have the following powers: 

1, To hear and decide appeals in accordance with Section 8 of Chapter 40A of the General Laws, as 
amended, including: 

a. Appeals from decisions of the Town Engineer concerning plans for off-street parking. 

2. To hear and decide, in accordance with the provisions of Section 9 of Chapter 40A of the General 



113 



ARTICLE 27. (continued) 

Laws, as amended, applications for special permits including: 

a. Permits for uses requiring authorization of the Board of Appeals as specified in Sections 
III-l.B., III-2.B., III-3.B., III-4.A.8,, III-4.B., III-5.B., III-6.B., and III-6.C.1. 

b. Permits for building heights greater than, or set-backs and/or yard areas less than those 
otherwise required as provided in Sections V-2.B, and V-4.D. 

c. Permits for dumping and filling, as provided in Section VII-2. 

d. Permits to change, alter and/or extend a nonconforming use as provided in Sections VI-l.B. 
and VI-l.C, and for temporary uses as provided in Section VI-2.; subject to such conditions 
as the Board may impose in accordance with Paragraph C.2. below. 

3. To hear and decide appeals and petitions for variances in accordance with Section 10 of Chapter 
40A of the General Laws, as amended, after finding that owing to circumstances relating to the 
soil conditions, shape, or topography of such land or structures and especially affecting such 
land or structures but not affecting generally the zoning district in which it is located, a 
literal enforcement of the provisions of the by-law would involve substantial hardship, financii 
or otherwise, to the appellant or petitioner, and that desirable relief may be granted without 
substantial derogation from the intent or purpose of the by-law. 

a. Conditions, safeguards and limitations both of time and of use may be imposed, including thi 
continued existence of any particular structure. 

b. If the rights authorized by a variance are not exercised within one year of the date of 
grant of such variance they shall lapse, and may be re-established only after notice and a 
new hearing pursuant to Section 10 of Chapter 40A of the General Laws, as amended. 

C. Particular Powers 

Delete in its entirety and insert in its place the following: 
C. Procedure u 

1. In exercising the powers granted by paragraph B. above, the Board of Appeals shall act in ac- 
cordance with the provisions of Sections 8, 9, 11, 14, 15, and 16 of Chapter 40A of the General 
Laws , as amended . 

2. In granting any special permit the Board of Appeals shall assure that: 

a. The specific site is an appropriate location for the use or structure; 

b. The use developed will not adversely affect the neighborhood; 

c. There will not be an undue nuisance or serious hazard to vehicles or pedestrians, and ade- 
quate and appropriate facilities will be provided to ensure the proper operation of the pro- 
posed use, structure or condition; 

d. The proposed use or structure will be in harmony with the general purpose of this By-Law; 
And shall consider recommendations of the Planning Board. 

3. In exercising the powers granted by Paragraph B. above, the Board of Appeals may impose such cor 
ditions, safeguards and limitations, both of time and use, as it may deem reasonably appropriate 
to protect the neighborhood or otherwise serve the purpose of this By-Law. 

4. Where action by the Board of Appeals is required under this By-Law, a written application there- 
for shall be submitted by delivery or by registered mail, with return receipt requested to the 
clerk of the Board of Appeals or to such other person as the Board may have authorized to re- 
ceive such applications; a copy of which shall forthwith be given to the Town Clerk by the applj 
cant. If submission is by delivery, the clerk (or other authorized person) shall give a writtet 
receipt therefor, indicating the date of such submission. The Board of Appeals shall hold a 
public hearing with regard to any such application within sixty-five (65) days of the filing 
thereof . 

a. In the case of special permits under Section VIII-4.B.2., the Board of Appeals shall act 
thereon within ninety (90) days of the filing of the application therefor or the permit shal 
be deemed to be granted. ' 

b. In the case of appeals or applications for variances under Sections VIII-4.B.1. and VIII-4. 
B.3., the Board of Appeals shall act thereon within seventy-five (75) days of the filing of 
the application therefor. 

c. Should the Board of Appeals fail to act within the time limits specified in paragraphs a. an 
b. above, the application shall be deemed approved, and the Board of Appeals shall authorize 
the issuance of a permit for the proposed use, provided such use is otherwise in conformity 
with this By-Law. 

d. A special permit granted as authorized in Section 9 of Chapter 40A of the General Laws, as 
amended, shall lapse at the end of one (1) year if a substantial use or construction has not 
begun by such date. 

;provided that if the whole or any part of the Zoning By-Law as amended is subsequently disapproved by the 
Town Meeting or the Attorney General, the previous Zoning By-Law, to the extent that such previous Zoning 



114 



ARTICLE 27. (continued) 

By-Law was changed by the disapproved By-Law or portion thereof, shall be deemed to be in effect from the date 
of such vote; or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee recommended approval. 

Motion by Mr, William G. Hooper, Jr.: "I move that the Town vote to accept the provisions of Chapter 808 of 
the Acts of 1975 and amend the Zoning By-Law in the following manner to bring it into conformance therewith, 
to wit:" Here the Moderator asked if the motion followed exactly the wording of the article. Mr. Hooper said 
yes for the exception of two small changes which he read to the meeting, and was shown in the article. 

Amendment by Mr. Costos Papaliolios. Under Section III-l. Uses in rural, single residence A and single 
residence B Districts, replace what appears in the warrant with: 

A. 9 delete this part in its entirety and insert in its place the following: 

A. 9 Accessory uses as listed herein 
i a. All uses within the principal residence subject to the regulations of the Board of Health that 

are not detrimental to the residential character of the neighborhood are hereby permitted. 

After some deliberation the amendment lost by a voice vote. At this time a quorum was questioned - standing 
count showed that there were 227 voters present. Our quorum being 150. The Planning Board reported approval 
of this article and motion to the Town Meeting. After long and varied arguments and questions to the Town 
Counsel the Moderator asked if the meeting was ready for the question. Vote on the main motion as made by 
the Planning Board. Standing Yes-131 No-12 Motion carries and was so declared by the Moderator. 

At this time Mr. Joseph Courtney moved to advance Article #36 for consideration. So voted. 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to amend the zoning by-law and map of the Town of Wilmington by 
voting to rezone Single Residence A District to Industrial District the following described premises: 
The land in Wilmington situated on the Southerly side of Lowell Street and bounded as follows: 
Northerly by Lowell Street, Westerly by West Street, Southerly by the existing Industrial District; and 
Easterly by Route 93; or do anything in relation thereto. On Petition. Finance Committee recommended 
disapproval . 

totion by Mr. Courtney: "I move to refer Article #36 to the Planning Board for further study and considera- 
tion." So voted. 

^r. Courtney moved to advance Article #35 for consideration. So voted. 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Laws and Zoning District Map of the Town of 
iJilmington by voting to rezone from an existing General Business District to a High Density Traffic Business 
District the following described parcel of land, to wit: 

Land now or formerly of Enon Enterprises, Inc., shown as and designated "Plan of Land in Wilmington, 
Massachusetts, showing area to be rezoned. Scale 1" = 40', dated January 3, 1977, and drawn by Hayes 
Engineering, Inc." 

copy of said plan is filed with the Office of the Town Clerk. Said land is bounded and described as 
follows : 

Beginning at the Northwesterly corner of Woburn and Lowell Streets, 300 feet along the Northerly side- 
line of Lowell Street, and running along Lowell Street Westerly 300 feet to a point; thence turning 90 
degrees and running Northerly 330 + - feet to a point; thence turning and running Easterly along a line 
parallel to and 200 + - feet Southerly of the existing general business zone line, 284 + - feet to a 
point on the Westerly sideline of Woburn Street; thence turning and running Southerly along the Westerly 
sideline of Woburn Street, 384 + - feet to the point of beginning. 
Said area to be rezoned containing 100,000 + - square feet and shown as Lot B on "Plan of Land in Wilmington, 
■lassachusetts , showing area to be rezoned. Scale 1" = 40', dated January 3, 1977, and drawn by Hayes 
Engineering, Inc." Or what action it will take thereon. (Petition) Finance Committee recommended dis- 
approval. 

•lotion by Mr. Courtney: "I move to refer Article #35 to the Planning Board for further study and considera- 
tion." So voted. 

\RTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to grant to the Commonwealth of 
j -lassachusetts through its Department of Public Works whose Post Office address is 100 Nashua Street, Boston, 
j-Iassachusetts , all right, title, claim and demand whatsoever as said grantor has or ought to have in and to 
certain vehicular bridges, being continuations and extensions of public ways in the Town of Wilmington pro- 
j/iding vehicular passage for the public over land of the Boston and Maine Railroad Corporation-Debtor and/or 



115 



ARTICLE 28. (continued) 

the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority: 
STREET 

a. Eames Street 

b. Butters Row 

c. Burlington Avenue 

d. Lake Street 

e. Nichols Street 



BRIDGE NO. 
W-38-1 
W-38-3 
W-38-4 
W-38-7 
W-38-8 



RAILROAD NO. 
13.67 
14.48 
15.18 
17.04 
17.42 

The Finance Committee 



all pursuant to Chapter 634 of the Acts of 1971; or do anything in relation thereto, 
recommended approval of $250. 

Motion by Mr. James Banda: "I move that the Town vote to raise and appropriate $250 to authorize the Board 
of Selectmen to grant to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts through its Department of Public Works whose Post 
Office address is 100 Nashua Street, Boston, Massachusetts, all right, title, claim and demand whatsoever as 
said grantor has or ought to have in and to certain vehicular bridges, being continuations and extensions of 
public ways in the Town of Wilmington providing vehicular passage for the public over land of the Boston and 
Maine Railroad Corporation-Debtor and/or the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority: 



STREET 

a. Eames Street 

b. Butters Row 

c. Burlington Avenue 

d. Lake Street 

e. Nichols Street 
all pursuant to Chapter 634 of the Acts of 1971. 
voted . 



BRIDGE NO. 
W-38-1 
W-38-3 
W-38-4 
W-38-7 
W-38-8 



RAILROAD NO. 
13.67 
14.48 
15.18 
17.04 
17.42 



Finance Committee recommended $250. Motion as above so 



ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for plans or construction 
of recreational or athletic facilities, and determine how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, 
transfer from available funds, or otherwise; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Aldo A. Caira: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of 
$10,000 for plans or construction of recreational or athletic facilities." Finance Committee recommended dii 
approval. The Planning Board recommended approval. Vote taken by voice and the Moderator declared the "ayes 
have it. So voted. 

e; 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to accept as Town ways, the layout of the following described 
streets, as recommended by the Planning Board and laid out by the Selectmen under the provisions of General 
Laws (Chapter 82, as amended, relating to the Laying Out, Alteration, Relocation and Discontinuance of Public 
Ways and specific repairs thereon) , which layouts are filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which, with 
plans therein, are hereby referred to for more particular description; and to authorize the Board of Select- 
men to take by right of eminent domain such land, slope, drainage or other easements as may be necessary to 
effect the purpose of this Article; and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxa- 
tion or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise for the purpose of construction of said 
ways and for the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land, slope, drainage or other easements 
therefor; or do anything in relation thereto: 

a. Fletcher Lane, from Kilmarnock Street to Morgan Road 

b. Morgan Road, from Kilmarnock Street 653.31 feet southerly 

c. Presidential Drive, from Boutwell Street 826.07 feet sputherly. 
Finance Committee recommended approval of $150. 

Motion by Mr. A. John Imbimbo: "I move that the Town vote to accept as Town ways, the layout of the follow- 
ing described streets, as recommended by the Planning Board and laid out by the Selectmen under the provisior 
of General Laws (Chapter 82, as amended, relating to the Laying Out, Alteration, Relocation and Discontinu- 
ance of Public Ways and specific repairs thereon), which layouts are filed in the office of the Town Clerk, 
and which, with plans therein, are hereby referred to for more particular description; and to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to take by right of eminent domain such land, slope, drainage or other easements as may bt 
necessary to effect the purpose of this Article; and to vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of 
$150 for the purpose of construction of said ways and for the payment of any damages resulting from the tak- 
ing land, slope, drainage or other easements therefor: 

116 



IK 

e I 

iSi 



ARTICLE 30. (continued) 

a. Fletcher Lane, from Kilmarnock Street to Morgan Road 

b. Morgan Road, from Kilmarnock Street 653.31 feet southerly 

c. Presidential Drive, from Boutwell Street 826.07 feet southerly." 

The Finance Committee approved $150. The Planning Board recommended approval to the Town Meeting. Motion 
voted unanimously and so declared by the Moderator. 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to sell and convey to Janet I. Martin, an heir of the former owner, 
the property shown on Assessors' Map 33 as Parcel 37, upon receipt of a sum equal to all unpaid taxes, inter- 
est and expenses which have accrued upon the property to the date of sale; or do anything in relation thereto. 

I Motion by Mr. A. Daniel Gillis: "I move that we vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to sell and convey 
to Janet I. Martin, an heir of the former owner, the property shown on Assessors' Map 33, as Parcel 37, upon 
receipt of the sum of $5,333 - equal to all unpaid taxes, interest and expenses which have accrued upon the 
property to the date of sale." Finance Committee approved this motion. Planning Board recommended approval 
to the Town Meeting. Motion so voted unanimously and so declared by the Moderator. 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to Adam S. Kozlowski 
a certain parcel of land situated in Wilmington, Massachusetts, on Newland Avenue, being Lots 337 and 338 as 
shown on a plan entitled " Wilmington Terrace, Wilmington, Mass., owned by Frank W. Coughlin," dated August 
24, 1908, H. A. Millhouse C.E. recorded in Middlesex District Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 25, Plan 43, to 
which plan reference is hereby made for a more particular description. Said lot of land contains 3,200 square 
feet of land more or less. Said land or interest in said land to be sold and conveyed by the Selectmen sub- 
ject to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may determine and further to set the minimum amount to be 
ipaid for such conveyance; or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee recommended approval. 

Motion by Mr. A. Daniel Gillis: "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to 
Adam S. Kozlowski a certain parcel of land situated in Wilmington, Massachusetts, on Newland Avenue, being 
Lots 337 and 338 as shown on a plan entitled "Wilmington Terrace, Wilmington, Mass., owned by Frank W. 
Coughlin," dated August 24, 1908, H. A. Millhouse C.E. recorded in Middlesex District Registry of Deeds, 
Plan Book 25, Plan 43, to which plan reference is hereby made for a more particular description. Said lot of 
land contains 3,200 square feet of land more or less. Said land or interest in said land to be sold and con- 
veyed by the Selectmen subject to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may determine and further to 
set the minimum amount of $400 to be paid for such conveyance." The Planning Board recommended disapproval 
of this motion to the Town Meeting. Motion so voted unanimously and so declared by the Moderator. 

lARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to William L. Keough 
land Elaine F. Keough a certain parcel of Town-owned land shown as Parcel 8A on Assessors' Map 89, containing 
i about 34,460 square feet of land, bounded and described as follows: 

Starting at a point at the intersection of Middlesex Avenue and Jefferson Road and running westerly 
along Middlesex Avenue, 105 feet more or less; thence turning and running northerly 314 feet, more or 
less; thence turning and running easterly to Jefferson Road; thence turning and running southerly along 
Jefferson Road, 283 feet more or less, 
i Said land to be sold and conveyed by the Selectmen subject to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may 
[determine and further to set the minimum amount to be paid for such conveyance; or do anything in relation 
thereto. (Petition) Finance Committee recommended disapproval. 

IMotion by Mr. Simon Cutter, attorney: "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and con- 
vey to William L. Keough and Elaine F. Keough for the sum of Eleven Thousand Five Hundred Dollars ($11,500) 
ipart of a certain parcel of Town-owned land containing 20,745 square feet, bounded and described as follows: 
Beginning at a point in the westerly sideline of Truman Road, also known as Jefferson Road, said point 
being northerly and distant 92,62 feet from the northerly terminus of a curve of 20.00 feet radius con- 
necting to Middlesex Avenue, thence S 62 degrees 08' 30"W distant 73,05 feet to a point, thence S 62 
degrees 09 '09" W distant 28,04 feet to a point, thence N 19 degrees 29 ' 30" W distant 214.80 feet to a 
point, thence N 70 degrees 30' 30" E distant 100.00 feet to a point, thence S 19 degrees 29' 30" E distant 
200.11 feet to the point of beginning, containing 20,745 square feet. 
Said land to be sold and conveyed by the Selectmen subject to the condition that the above described land may 
be used for public parking with the exception of the area to be built upon." Finance Committee recommended 
disapproval. Planning Board reported disapproval. After some discussion the Moderator put the question. 
Standing vote Yes-55 No-98 Motion was lost and so declared by the Moderator. 

iARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to Everett P. and 
Abbie G. McQuaid a certain parcel of Town-owned land shown as Parcel 47 on Assessors' Map 54, containing 

117 



ARTICLE 34. (continued) 

about 24,000 square feet, subject to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may determine, and further t 
set the minimum amount to be paid for such conveyance; or do anything in relation thereto. (Petition) 

Motion by Mrs. McQuaid: "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to Everett 
P. and Abbie G. McQuaid a certain parcel of Town-owned land shown as Parcel 47 on Assessors' Map 54, con- 
taining about 24,000 square feet, subject to the following restrictions: 

For the benefit of the grantor herein that the premises herein conveyed shall become part of the 
grantee's contiguous premises (i.e., that lot shown on Assessors' Map 54 as Parcel 46) and shall only 
be used for extension of a principal building structure currently existing and/or for any lawful acces- 
sory use appurtenant thereto. And for the benefit of the grantor herein that the premises herein con- 
veyed shall not be divided or subdivided either with or without the grantee's contiguous premises. Th€ 
above restrictions shall run with the land herein described and shall be binding on the grantee, his 
heirs and assigns and successors in title, all in accordance with law. 
And further to set the minimum amount to be paid for such conveyance at not less than One Thousand Dollars 
($1,000)." 



After some debate the vote was taken. Yes-69 No-44 Lost for want of a two-thirds vote. A motion to re 
consider this article came later in the meeting. Yes-73 No-48 Motion so voted to reconsider the action 
on this article. A standing vote was taken again on Article 34. Yes -106 No-26 Motion so voted and de- 
clared by the Moderator. 



ARTICLES 35 and 36 were taken out of order earlier. 



ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to petition the State Legisla- 
ture to authorize that Arthur J. Hall be allowed to take the Civil Service Police entrance examination for 
the position of patrolman in the Wilmington Police Department notwithstanding that he is more than thirty-tv 
years old. (Petition) Finance Committee recommended approval. 

Motion by Mr. Arthur J. Hall: "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to petition tht 
State Legislature that Arthur J. Hall be allowed to take the Civil Service Police entrance examination for 
the position of patrolman in the Wilmington Police Department notwithstanding that he is more than thirty- 
two years old." Vote taken by voice and declared so voted by the Moderator. 

The Moderator declared there being no further business to come before the Annual Town Meeting that said meeii 
ing is adjourned. Meeting adjourned at 8:00 p.m. 



There were 385 voters checked in at this meeting. 



Articles Voted by Taxation 
Water Articles Voted by Transfer 



Attest: 



$ 284,950,00 
$ 65,216.23 

(Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 
Town Clerk 

Wilmington, Massachusetts 



SPECIAL STATE PRIMARY - WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
HIGH SCHOOL GYMNASIUM, CHURCH STREET - May 24. 1977 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Wilmington: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By-Laws of 
said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified by law to vote, 
to meet and assemble at the High School Gymnasium on Tuesday, the twenty-fourth day of May next, the polls 
be open at 10:00 A.M. and shall be closed at 8:00 P.M. for the State Primary, for the following: 

One Senator for the Fifth Middlesex Senatorial District 

Hereof, fail not and make due return of this Warrant, or a certified copy thereof, with your doings thereon 
to the Town Clerk, as soon as may be and before said meeting. 

Given under our hands and seal of said Town this eleventh day of April, A.D., One Thousand Nine Hundred and 
Seventy-seven. 

118 



iPECIAL STATE PRIMARY (continued) 



ittest: 



Board of Selectmen 
s/Aldo Caira 
s /James F. Banda 
s/James R. Miceli 
s/A. Daniel Gillis 
s/A. John Imbimbo 

(Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 
Town Clerk 

Wilmington, Massachusetts 



tt 9:45 a.m. on May 24, 1977, the Town Clerk read the Town Warrant for this election. All the macnines in 
he 6 precincts were ready and at 10:00 a.m. the Town Clerk declared the polls were open. 

ill the totals from the 25 machines plus the 6 absentee ballots were recorded and declaration thereof made, 
is by law is directed, and were for the following: 



I 



SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 
5th MIDDLESEX DISTRICT (TO FILL VACANCY) 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



REPUBLICAN PARTY 



Carol C. Amick 
Joseph T. Maguire 
Virginia E. Mooney 
Others 
Blanks 



otal voted: 960 (10.7%) 



359 
127 
25 
2 

3 

516 



Michael A. Caira 
Marvin C. Gilkie 
Russell W. Miller 
Others 
Blanks 



421 
2 
18 
2 
1 

444 



he Board of Registrars were present and as voters left the polls they were allowed to fill out a party 
.hange card if they so desired. 



he Town Clerk read the result of this vote at 9:00 p.m. After the declaration of the vote the meeting 
djourned at 9:15 p.m. 



ttest: 



(Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 
Town Clerk 

Wilmington, Massachusetts 



SPECIAL STATE ELECTION - WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
HIGH SCHOOL GYMNASIUM, CHURCH STREET - June 21, 1977 

|o either of the Constables of the Town of Wilmington: 

'REETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By-Laws of 
aid Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified by law to vote, 
3 meet, and assemble at the High School Gymnasium on Tuesday, the twenty-first day of June, 1977. The polls 
be open at 7:00 a.m. and shall be closed at 8:00 p.m. for the State Election, for the following: 

One Senator for the Fifth Middlesex Senatorial District 

;reof, fail not and make due return of this Warrant, or a certified copy thereof, with your doings thereon 
3 the Town Clerk, as soon as may be and before said meeting. 

Lven under our hands and seal of said Town this first day of June, A.D., One Thousand Nine Hundred and 
2venty-seven. 

, Board of Selectmen 

s/Aldo Caira 
s/james R. Miceli 
s /James F. Banda 
s/A. Daniel Gillis 
s/A. John Imbimbo 

119 



SPECIAL STATE ELECTION 
Attest: 



(continued) 



(Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 
Town Clerk 

Wilmington, Massachusetts 



At 6:45 a.m. the Tovm Clerk read the Warrant for this election. All the machines in the 6 precincts were 
ready and the polls were declared open at 7:00 a.m. The polls were declared closed at 8:00 p.m. by the Town 
Clerk. 

All the totals from the 25 machines plus the 7 absentee ballots were recorded and a declaration thereof was 
made, as by law is directed and were for the following: 



SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 
5th MIDDLESEX DISTRICT (TO FILL A VACANCY) 



D - Carol C. Amick 509 

R - Michael A. Caira 1628 

A - Parker Weaver 13 

Others 4 

Total vote 2154 



The Town Clerk read the result of this vote at 8:45 p.m. and the meeting adjourned at 9:00 p.m. 

Attest: (Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 

Town Clerk 

Wilmington, Massachusetts 



SPECIAL STATE PRIMARY - WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
HIGH SCHOOL GYMNASIUM, CHURCH STREET - August 2, 1977 



To either of the Constables of the Town of Wilmington: 



GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By-Laws of 
said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified by law to vote, 
to meet and assemble at the High School Gymnasium on Tuesday, the second day of August, 1977. The polls to 
be open at 10:00 a.m. and shall be closed at 8:00 p.m. for the State Primary, for the following: 



One Representative for the 36th Middlesex District 



Hereof fail not and make due return of this Warrant, or a certified copy thereof, with your doings thereon 
to the Town Clerk, as soon as may be and before said meeting. 

Given under our hands and seal of said Town this eleventh day of July, A.D., One Thousand Nine Hundred and 
Seventy-seven. 



Board of Selectmen 
s/Aldo Caira 
s/ James R. Miceli 
s /James F. Banda 
s/A. Daniel Gillis 
s/A. John Imbimbo 

A true copy: 

Attest: (Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 

Town Clerk 

Wilmington, Massachusetts 



At 9:45 a.m. the Town Clerk read the Warrant for this election. All the machines in the 6 precincts were 
ready and the polls were declared open at 10:00 a.m. The polls were declared closed at 8:00 p.m. by the 
Town Clerk. 



All the totals from the 25 machines plus 131 absentee ballots and 1 American ballot were recorded and a decl 
ration thereof was made, as by law is directed and were for the following: 



120 



SPECIAL STATE PRIMARY (continued) 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 
36th MIDDLESEX DISTRICT (TO FILL VACANCY) 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



Robert J. Cain 
Thomas P. Marden 
Kevin B. McKelvey 
dominated- James R. Miceli 
Others 
Blanks 



1313 
59 
169 
1573 
1 

5 

3120 



REPUBLICAN PARTY 

There were no candidates names printed on the Republican 
Ballot. Below are listed the write-in votes. 



Robert J. Cain 
Thomas P . Marden 
James R. Miceli 
Aldo A. Caira 
Others 
Blanks 



63 
3 

68 
2 
7 

13 
156 



AMERICAN PARTY 



There were no candidates names printed on the American 
Ballot. 

James R. Miceli 1 

1 

/^hole total votes cast in this election 



.3277 



rhe Board of Registrars were present and as voters left the polls they were allowed to fill out a party change 
:ard if they so desired. 

rhe Town Clerk read the results of this vote at 9:15 p.m. and the meeting was then adjourned. 



j^ttest; 



(Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 
Town Clerk 



SPECIAL STATE ELECTION - WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
HIGH SCHOOL GYMNASIUM, CHURCH STREET - August 30, 1977 

Co either of the Constables of the Town of Wilmington: 

iJREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By-Laws of 
said Town, you are hereby directed to warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified by law to vote, to meet and 
assemble at the High School Gymnasium on Tuesday, the thirtieth day of August, 1977. The polls to be open 
at 10:00 a.m. and shall be closed at 8:00 p.m. for the State Election for the following: 

One Representative for the 36th Middlesex District 

lereof fail not and make due return of this Warrant, or a certified copy thereof, with your doings thereon to 
fihe Town Clerk, as soon as may be and before said meeting. 

^iven under our hands and seal of said Town this eighth day of August, A.D., One Thousand Nine Hundred and 
ieventy-seven . 

Board of Selectmen 
s/Aldo Caira 
s/A. Daniel Gillis 
s/A. John Imbimbo 

^ true copy: 

attest: (Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 

Town Clerk 

iVt 9:45 a.m. the Town Clerk, Esther L. Russell, read the Warrant for this election. All the machines in the 
) precincts were ready and the polls were declared open at 10:00 a.m. The polls were declared closed at 
i:00 p.m. by the Town Clerk. 



ill totals from the 25 machines plus 143 Absentee ballots were recorded and a declaration thereof was made, 



121 



SPECIAL STATE ELECTION (continued) 

as by law is directed and were for the following: 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 
36th MIDDLESEX DISTRICT (TO FILL VACANCY) 

VOTE FOR ONE 

ELECTED - JAMES R. MICELI 2375 
Robert J. Cain 1319 
Bernard C. Mahoney 3 
Blanks 110 

Others 1 

3808 



The Town Clerk read the results of this vote at 9:15 p.m. and the meeting was then adjourned. 42.1% of the 
voters took part in this election. 



Attest: (Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 

Town Clerk 

Wilmington, Massachusetts 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - October 3, 1977 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



To the Constable of the Town of Wilmington, Massachusetts; 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed by the Revised By- 
Laws of said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified to vote 
Town affairs to meet and assemble at the High School Barrows Auditorium, in said Town of Wilmington, on Mond 
the third day of October, A.D. 1977 at 7:30 p.m., then and there to act on the following articles. 

The Moderator, Mr. John M. Callan, called the meeting to order at 7:50 p.m. there being a quorum present. 
The Moderator asked that the Town Clerk, Esther L. Russell, to note in her minutes that the warrant for this 
meeting was properly posted, as by Town By-Law is required. Warrant was so posted. 

Mr. Callan read the Special Town Meeting Warrant until he was interrupted by Mr. Caira who moved that furthe 
reading be dispensed with. So voted. 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and authorize the Board of Selectmen to expend the 
allocation of funds received by the Town under Title II, Antirecession Fiscal Assistance, Federal Public Wor 
Employment Act of 1976 for the purpose of defraying part of the cost of public street lights. Account //345; 
do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Sterling C. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to appropriate $58,646.70 and authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to expend the allocation of funds received by the Town under Title II, Antirecession Fisc 
Assistance, Federal Public Works Employment Act of 1976 for the purpose of defraying part of the cost of 
public street lights. Account #345." Finance Committee recommended approval. The motion was unanimously 
voted and so declared by the Moderator. 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds and appropriate a sum of money for 
the Insurance and Bonds Account #910; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Sterling C. Morris: "I move that the sum of $35,000.00 be appropriated for the Insurance and 
Bonds Account #910, and that said sum be raised by transfer from the Blue Cross/Blue Shield and Group Life 
Account #941." Finance Committee approved. An amendment was offered and the Moderator ruled it was out-of- 
order. The motion was put to a voice vote and the Moderator declared the "ayes" have it. So voted. 

ARTICLE 3. To see If the Town will vote to petition the General Court for authority to provide for the 
issuance of licenses to clubs located within the boundaries of the Town, for the sale of all alcoholic bever 
ages to be consumed on the premises; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Aldo A. Caira: "I move that the Town vote to petition the General Court for Authority to pro- 
vide for the issuance of licenses to clubs located within the boundaries of the Town, for the sale of all 



122 



ICLE 3. (continued) 

ohollc beverages to be consumed on the premises." The Finance Committee recommended approval. The motion 
put to a voice vote and the Moderator declared the "ayes" have it. So voted. 

ICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to Gloria and Milton C. 
ner a part of a certain parcel of Town-owned land shown as Parcel 168 on Assessors' Map 44, containing about 
000 square feet, subject to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may determine, and further to set the 
imum amount to be paid for such conveyance; or do anything in relation thereto: 

Map 44 Part of Parcel 168 

Lots 231-234 inclusive 

Easterly by Faneuil Drive (Washington St.) 100 feet 
Southerly by Lot 230, 100 feet 

Westerly by Lots 287, 288 and part of 289, 100 feet 
Northerly by Lot 235, 100 feet 

containing 10,000 square feet, all as shown on plan entitled, "Pinegrove Park, Silverlake, Mass. 1909, 
Scale 50 feet equals 1 inch, John S. Crossman, C.E." 

ion by Mr. James F. Banda: "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to 
ria and Milton C. Warner a part of a certain parcel of Town-owned land shown as Parcel 168 on Assessors' 
44, containing about 10,000 square feet, subject to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may determine, 
further to set the minimum amount of $400.00 to be paid for such conveyance. 
Map 44 Part of Parcel 168 
Lots 231-234 inclusive 

Easterly by Faneuil Drive (Washington Street) 100 feet 
Southerly by Lot 230, 100 feet 

Westerly by Lots 287, 288 and part of 289, 100 feet 
Northerly by Lot 235, 100 feet 

containing 10,000 square feet, all as shown on a plan entitled, "Pinegrove Park, Silverlake, Mass. 1909, 
Scale 50 feet equals 1 inch, John S. Crossman, C.E." 

Finance Committee recommended approval. Since this motion needed a two-thirds vote, the action was taken 
[standing Yes-181 No-3 Motion carries. 

ICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to petition the General Court for authority to transfer from available 
ds and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of providing water to three homes located on Cook Hill, 

absence of which has caused extreme hardship to the said residents of Cook Hill and that said authorization 
ill take effect immediately upon passage by the General Court; or do anything in relation thereto. 

ion by Mr. A. Daniel Gillis: "I move that the Town vote to petition the General Court for authority to 
nsfer from Blue Cross/Blue Shield and Group Life Account #941 the sum of $15,000.00 for the purpose of pro- 
Ing water to three homes located on Cook Hill, the absence of which has caused extreme hardship to the said 
idents of Cook Hill and that said authorization shall take effect immediately upon passage by the General 
irt." The Finance Committee recommended disapproval. 

mdment by Mr. Gillis: "After the word Court, 'and that the cost of said improvement be assessed to the 

ers in accordance with Chapter 80 and all other Acts pertaining thereto'." The Finance Committee recommend- 

approval under Betterments. 

:,e on amendment-by voice. The Moderator declared the "ayes" have it. So voted. 

n motion as amended-by voice. The Moderator declared the "ayes" have it. So voted. 

TCLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey at the next Special or 
:ual Town Meeting to Sandra A. and, Dana S. Romsey a certain parcel of Town-owned land shown as parcel 60 on 
essors' Map 40, containing about 24,650 square feet, subject to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen 

determine, and further to set the minimum amount to be paid for such conveyance; or do anything in relation 
treto : 

Parcel of land shown on "Plan of France B. Hiller Recorded with Middlesex No. Dist. Deeds Book of Plans 3C 
plan 141" as lots 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, and bounded as follows from said plan: 
Southwesterly: by Plymouth Avenue 103+ feet by scale 

Northwesterly: by Young Street (now called Adams St.) 251+ feet by scale 
Northeasterly: by Sheldon Avenue 102+ feet by scale 
Southeasterly: by Lot 160 and Lot 1 245+ feet by scale. 



123 



I 



ARTICLE 6. (continued) 

These lots are also roughly shown on "Plan of land in Wilmington, Mass. Scale: 40 feet to an inch - August 
19, 1965 - Joseph Selwyn, Civil Engineer, 14 Linden Ave., Belmont, Mass. L. C. Survey of abutting lot shown 
on L. C. Plan 34149A, dated November 23, 1965 by Joseph Selwyn, Surveyor - August 19, 1965, July 2, 1968." 

Parcel shown on Assessors' Map 40, Lot 60 on Town of Wilmington Assessors' Maps. By petition. 

Motion by Mr. James R. Miceli: "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to 
Sandra A. and Dana S. Romsey a certain parcel of Town-owned land shown as parcel 60 on Assessors' Map 40, cor 
taining about 24,650 square feet, subject to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may determine, and 
further to set the minimum amount of $8,000.00 to be paid for such conveyance. 

Parcel of land shown on "Plan of France B. Hiller Recorded with Middlesex No. Dist. Deeds Book of Plans 3C pi 
141" as lots 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, and bounded as follows from said plan: 

Southwesterly: by Plymouth Avenue 103+ feet by scale 

Northwesterly: by Young Street (now called Adams St.) 251+ by scale 

Northeasterly: by Sheldon Avenue 102+ feet by scale 

Southeasterly: by Lot 160 and Lot 1 245+ feet by scale. 

These lots are also roughly shown on "Plan of land in Wilmington, Mass. Scale: 40 feet to an inch - August 
1965 - Joseph Selwyn, Civil Engineer, 14 Linden Avenue, Belmont, Mass. L. C. Survey of abutting lot shown or 
L. C. Plan 34149A, dated November 23, 1965 by Joseph Selwyn, Surveyor - August 19, 1965, July 2, 1968." 

Parcel shown on Assessors' Map 40, Lot 60 on Town of Wilmington Assessors' Maps." The Finance Committee 
recommended approval. 

This motion called for a two-thirds vote but the Moderator said he would try it by voice first. Vote taken b 
voice and the Moderator declared it was voted unanimously in favor. 

There being no further business to come before this meeting the Moderator declared the meeting adjourned. Soj 
voted . 



Meeting adjourned at 9:00 p.m. 

The number of voters checked in at this meeting was two hundred sixty-four (264) . 

Attest: (Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 

Town Clerk 

Wilmington, Massachusetts 





Town Accountant 



ANALYSIS OF CASH ACCOUNT 
July 1, 1976 to June 30, 1977 



Balance as of July 1, 1976 

Add: Cash Receipts 7/1/76 to 6/30/77 

Deduct: Cash Expenditures 7/1/76 to 6/30/77 
Balance on Hand 6/30/77 



2,126,166.92 
26,537,260.56 
28,663,427.48 
26,465,964.31 

2,197,463.17 



rax Collections: 

Personal Property, Levy 1973 

1974 
1975 
1976 
1977 

Real Estate, Levy 1975 

1976 
1977 

Real Estate Taxes (1973) In Litigation 
ietterments Added To Taxes: 



Water Assessments, Levy 1975 

1976 
1977 

Street Assessments, Levy 1977 
Sewer Assessments, Levy 1977 
fater Liens Added To Taxes: 

1975 
1976 
1977 



Levy 



ANALYSIS OF CASH RECEIVED 

17.70 
8.85 
101.70 
3,822.40 
333,696.29 
72,465.96 
73,591.03 
9,071,531.03 
908.60 

165.79 
149.61 
12,410.47 



848.73 
544.67 
22.206.44 



■ew er Liens Added To Taxes: 

Levy 1977 
' ax Titles & Possessions: 
Tax Titles 

Sale of Tax Possessions 
ro-Forma Taxes 
■ ssessments Paid in Advance: 

Water 

Street 

napportioned Street Assessments - Paid in Full 



2,781.01 
13,476.17 



1,571.80 
2,044.99 



337,646.94 



9,218,496.62 



12,725.87 
11,552.27 
11,492.59 



23,599.84 
78.70 



16,257.18 
147.92 



3,616.79 
1,000.00 



9,636,614.72 



AMOUNTS BORROWED 



hort Term Loans: 
Temporary Loan, Antic, of Revenue 



1,000,000.00 



125 



GRANTS AND GIFTS 



Federal Aid: 
Schools : 

Federal Employment Act //PL874 
National Defense Education #PL85-864 
Reading Skills 

Bureau of Library Extensions 
Head Start 
Sewer Project 

Title II Antirecession Fiscal Funds 
Public Grants: 

State Aid to Highways 

County Aid to Highways 

Highway Fund, Chp. 283, Acts 1976 

Sewer Project 

Handicapped Children, Schools 
State Aid to Public Libraries 
C.E.T.A. Funds 
Veterans' Services 



18,161.05 
23,979.03 
113,998.38 
4,872.08 
13,300.00 



34,976.53 
9,450.00 
86,464.00 
17,843.00 
3,419.00 
6,413.25 
106.90 



174,310.54 
12,353.00 
102,135.42 



158,672.68 
12,726.93 



460,198.57 



REVOLVING FUNDS 



School Lunch Program: 

State Reimbursements 

Program Receipts 
High School Athletic Association 
Recreation Dedicated Accounts 
Outside Detail Account 



193,082.73 
216,333.50 



409,416.23 
13,499.82 
9,221.23 
31,028.12 



463,165.40 



Water Guaranteed Deposits 
Water Department: 

Water Rates 

Water Services 

Water Installations 

Industrial Fire Protection Rates 

Water Available Surplus 

Industrial Way Pumping Station 
Appropriation Refunds 
Surplus Revenue 
Veterans' Aid Settlements 
Veterans' Aid Reimbursements 
Recording Fees 
Sale of Cemetery Lots 
Carter Lecture Fund, Reimbursements 
Sale of Town Owned Land 
Perpetual Care Funds 



RESTRICTED RECEIPTS 



471,010.29 
3,756.75 
716.78 
14,843.72 
16.01 
2,129.53 



483.25 
1,859.18 



10,656.48 



492,473.08 
22,915.42 
5,291.60 

2,342.43 
144.84 

11,145.00 
845.10 
400.00 

11.550.00 



557,763.95 



AGENCY & TRUST FUNDS 



Short Term Investments 
Employees Deductions: 



Federal . Withholding 


1,342,509 


91 


State Withholding 


400,130 


08 


Retirement System, Town 


152,346 


45 


Teachers 


258,354 


08 


Blue Cross/Blue Shield 


145,970 


54 


Group Insurance 


2,288 


18 


Washington National Insurance 


7,189 


67 


Tax Sheltered Annuities 


50,997 


56 


Credit Union 


592,539 


92 


Union Dues 


44,202 


53 


Court Ordered Deductions 


84 


91 


U. S. Savings Bonds 


14,400 


00 



Fish & Game Licenses for Commonwealth 
County Dog Licenses 
Lunch Food Tax, State 



7,850.000.00 



3,011,013.83 
5,913.00 
5,334.10 
782.19 



10,873,043.12 



126 



ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 



Schools, State Reimbursements 

Real Estate Abatements, Veterans, State 

Blind, State 
Widows, State 

Loss of Taxes, State 
State Lottery Funds 

School Zone Lights, Reimbursement State 
Motor Vehicle Excise Collections: 

Prior Levies 

Current Levy- 
Farm Animal Excise 
Sewer Rentals 
Ambulance 
Liquor Licenses 
Interests & Costs: 

Short Term Investments 

Tax Collections 

Water Demands 

Tax Title Interests & Costs 

Betterment Interest - Paid in full 

General Fund Investments 
Municipal Receipts: 

Selectmen 

Tax Collector 

Town Clerk 

Planning Board 
Police Department 
Building Inspector 

Building Permits 

Wire Permits 

Plumbing Permits 

Gas Permits 
Sealer of Weights & Measures 
Engineering Department 
Highway Department 

Sale of Junk 

State Aid Highway, Chapter 497 
Cemetery Department 
Health & Sanitation: 

Board of Health 

Public Nurse 

Sale of Dogs 

Drainlayer Permits 

Dog License Reimbursements 
Library Fines 

Fourth District Court Fines 
Division of Standards, State 
Census Reimbursements, State 
Advertising Charges 
Conservation Commission 
Insurance Reimbursements 
New England Tel. & Tel. Commissions 
Cablevision Fees 



TOTAL RECEIPTS FOR PERIOD JULY 1, 1976 to JUNE 30, 1977 



2,405,259.16 
6,500.58 
1,575.00 
16,625.00 
880.78 
76,589.84 
25,087.00 

384,508.52 
289,092.99 



47,579.26 
23,289.36 
3,706.24 
7,288.68 
35 . 31 
11,094.01 

458.00 
2,986.25 
5,981.98 
2,436.00 



9,908.00 
3,624.75 
997.00 
928.00 



26.00 
88,987.62 



3,111.75 
247.50 
258.00 
75.00 

3,061.41 



2,532,517.36 



673,601.51 
243.75 
86,960.86 
4,581.00 
8,000.00 



92,992.86 



11,862.23 
2.803.00 



15,457.75 
430.00 
272.50 



89,013.62 
9,766.00 



6,753.66 
548.98 

3,695.00 
48.00 

4,402.25 
24.50 
150.00 

1,740.20 
359.77 
250.00 



3.546,474.80 
$26,537,260.56 



127 



DISBURSEMENTS FROM GENERAL ACCOUNTS 
ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES OTHER THAN THAT RAISED FROM 
APPROPRIATION FOR THE PERIOD 7/1/76 - 6/30/77 



Refunds : 

Personal Property Taxes 

Real Estate Taxes 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 

Tax Title Recording Fees 

Ambulance Account 

Estimated Receipts 

Surplus Revenue 
Water Department: 

Rates 

Liens, 1977 

Water Guaranteed Deposits 
Assessments - State & County: 
State Hospital 
State Recreation 
State Audit 
M.D.C. Sewer 

Motor Vehicle Excise Bills 
Air Pollution Control 
Area Planning Council 
M.B.T.A. 

Ipswich River Watershed District 

County Tax 

County Retirement 
Legal Settlements 
Outside Details: 

Police 

Maintenance 

Miscellaneous Departments 
Employee Deductions: 

Withholding Taxes, Federal 
State 

Retirement, Town Employees 

Teachers 
Group Insurance 

Washington National Insurance - Teachers 
U. S. Savings Bonds 

Blue Cross/Blue Shield - Town Employees 

Teachers 

Tax Sheltered Annuities - Teachers 

Credit Union 
Union Dues : 

Town Employees 

Police Department 

Fire Department 

Maintenance Department 

Teachers 
Agency Accounts: 

County Dog Licenses 

State Fish & Game Licenses 

Lunch Food Tax 

Housing Authority 

Recreation, Dedicated Accounts 
Federal Grants and Aid - School: 

Public Law 874 

Head Start 

Title II, Library Extensions 

Title I, Reading Skills 

Child Development, Kindergarten 



164.70 
49.50 
919.61 



12, 
68, 
33, 
147, 
2, 
1, 
2, 
201, 
2, 



634.36 
899.70 
075.04 
029.03 
297.25 
308.52 
534.21 
240.32 
188.01 



449, 
310, 



771.51 
341.00 



2,493.00 
2,881.42 
1.983.00 
3,592.00 
33,253.11 



193.93 
12,065.73 
11,903.23 
144.84 
30.00 
573.55 
1,903.50 



1,133.81 



471,206.44 
760,112.51 



21,084.00 
9,318.78 
853.50 

1,342,509.91 
400,130.08 
154,321.61 
264,542.95 
2,239.37 
7,423.51 
14,400.00 
82,603.40 
62,531.74 
54,511.87 
592,539.92 



44,202.53 

5,053.90 
5,913.00 
756.72 
28.00 
8,933.84 

30,954.65 
13,300.00 

4,779.90 
75,804.88 

2,434.78 



27,948.59 



1,231,318.95 
85,156.78 



31,256.28 



3,021,956.89 



20,685.46 



128 



DISBURSEMENTS FROM GENERAL ACCOUNTS 



Title VI 

Title IV, E.S.E.A. 

Water Department: 

Maintenance & Operation 
Silver Lake Sewer Construction 
Acquire Land Town Forest 
Acquire Land for School Projects 
School Lunch Program 
High School Athletic Association 
Carter Lecture Fund 
Cemetery Trust Funds 
Sale of Cemetery Lots 
Temporary Loans : 

Anticipation of Reimbursement 

Anticipation of Taxes 
Short Term Investments 



9,633.25 
2,594.95 



37,232.00 
1,000,000.00 



139,502.41 

388,602.34 
34,934.98 
87,150.00 
2,815.53 
396,335.44 
3,424.69 
882.18 
11,550.00 
50.00 



1,037,232.00 
7,350,000.00 



Total Expenditures from General Accounts 



13,870,802.52 



ANALYSIS OF THE ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 
USED BY THE ASSESSORS IN SETTING THE 1977 TAX RATE 
WITH THE ACTUAL 1976 RECEIPTS 



I 



fctor Vehicles & Trailer Excise 
licenses 
:ines 

special Assessments 

General Government 

Protection of Persons & Property 

fealth & Sanitation 

illghways 

Libraries, Local Receipts 

Cemeteries (Other than Trust Funds & Sale of Lots) 
Interest 

?arm Animal Excise 
Ambulance Service 
Sewer Revenue 

Workmen's Comp . & Insurance Reimbursement 
5og License Reimbursements 
Hicellaneous Receipts 



Used by 


the 






Assessors 


in 


Actual 


Setting 1977 


Receipt 


s 


Tax Rate 


1976 




677,539 


.32 


552,146. 


56 


14,000 


.00 


7,000. 


00 


5,897 


.45 


3,450. 


89 


28,396 


.75 


30,784. 


60 


7,640 


.25 


12,090. 


63 


24,t98 


.25 


19,692. 


75 


3,867 


.00 


4,094. 


75 


523 


.25 


754. 


50 


205 


.46 


741. 


50 


9,353 


.40 


9,775. 


00 


128,379 


.86 


111,731. 


22 


436 


.71 


272. 


00 


4,423 


.25 


4,291. 


60 


59,856 


.87 


78,503. 


19 


8,181 


.65 


1,606. 


60 


3,472 


.56 


3,259. 


92 


862 


.14 


549. 


73 


977,334 


.17 


840,745. 


44 



More 
Than 
Estimated 



2,387.85 
4,450.38 

227.75 
231.25 
536.04 
421.60 



18,646.32 



Less 
Than 
Estimated 

125,392.76 
7,000.00 
2,446.56 



4,605.50 



16,648.64 
164.71 
131.65 

6,575.05 
212.64 
312.41 



26,901.19 163,489.92 



129 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
BALANCE SHEET - JUNE 30, 1977 



ASSETS 



Cash 

Petty Cash Advances 
Taxes Uncollected: 
Prior Levies 



2,197,463.17 
575.00 



2,198,038.17 



Personal Property Taxes in litigation 
Levy 1969 
Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes: 
Prior Levies 
Levy 1971 
1972 
1973 
1974 
1975 
1976 
Current Levy 
Tax Titles & Possessions: 



Tax Titles 

Tax Possessions 
Assessments Added to Taxes: 

Street Assessments 1975 
1976 
1977 

Committed Interest 1975 
1976 
1977 

Water Assessments 1975 
1977 

Committed Interest 1976 
1977 

Betterments in Litigation 
Street Assessments 1972 
1973 

Committed Street Interest 1973 
Unapportioned Assessments 
Water 
Sewer 

Accounts Receivables: 
Water Department: 
Rates 
Services 

Water Installations 
Fire Protection Rates 
Industrial Way Pumping Station 
Water Liens 1976 
1977 

Sewer Rates 
State Aid to Highways 
County Aid to Highways 
Ambulance Account 
Unprovided for Accounts: 
Overlay Deficits: 
Levy 1972 

1973 

1974 

1975 

1976 

1977 

Legal Settlements 

Due from Carter Lecture Fund 

Trust Account 
Snow & Ice Removal 
Underestimates - Assessments 

County Tax Assessment 1976 
1977 

Mass. Bay Travel Auth. 1977 
County Hosp. Assess. 1977 

Loans Authorized 

Revenue, 1978 

TOTAL ASSETS 



Personal Property 


1972 


15 


60 




1973 


135 


70 




1974 


32 


45 




1975 


62 


15 




1976 


1,267 


20 


Real Estate Taxes 


1973 


175 


90 




1974 


75 


14 




1976 


111,450 


41 


Current Levies 








Personal Property 


1977 


4,526 


45 


Real Estate Taxes 


1977 


269,975 


12 



373.03 
4,840.80 
16,946.52 
7,530.27 
20,367.16 
72,049.38 



55.80 
55.80 

697.47 
40.16 
37.96 

462.85 

263.16 
1,463.89 

106.00 
1,047.11 

85.61 
55.80 
42.40 



1,654.78 
3,242.61 



148.20 
401.20 
234.53 
1,312.17 
5,913.20 
166,931.27 



1,513.10 

111,701.45 

274,501.57 
462.00 



122,107.16 
194,752.51 

49,886.84 
83,772.57 



1,350.04 



2,880.16 



183.81 

700.86 
34,038.14 



47,912.62 
3,560.38 
6.36 
908.48 
6,897.75 

4,897.39 



174,940.57 
85,156.78 
37.08 

55,792.38 

.06 

55,114.56 
36.32 
7,898.48 



388,178.12 



316,859.67 



133,659.41 



4,414.01 



34,739.00 



64,182.98 
1,535.78 
203,371.81 
7,555.18 
6,811.40 



130 



378,976.23 
7,097,000.00 
13.141,610.00 

$23.976,931.76 




TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
BALANCE SHEET - JUNE 30, 1977 

LIABILITIES & RESERVES 



Temporary Loan, Anticipation of Bond Issue 

1975 Real Estate Tax Overpaid 

1975 Water Liens Overpaid 

Sewer Use Overpaid 

Employee Payroll Deductions: 

Retirement System 

Teachers Retirement 

Group Insurance 

Washington National Insurance Co., Teachers 
Blue Cross/Blue Shield: Town 



Teachers 



Tax Sheltered Annuities 
jency Accounts: 



County Dog Licenses 

State Food Tax 

Court Ordered Deductions 
Revolving Accounts: 

Recreation Deducted Account 

School Lunch Program 

High School Athletic Account 
Federal Grants & Aids: 

E.S.E.A Title II 

Children of Low Income Families 

Learning Resources Title IV 

Education, Handicapped Children Title VI 

N.D.E.A.Title IV-B 

N.D.E.A. PL 850 

World of Construction Title II 

Public Law #874 

Public Law //85-864 

CETA Funds 
State Aid to Public Libraries 
Water Guaranteed Deposits 
Tailings 

Glen Pines Trust 
Cor urn Meadows Trust 

Overestimates, State & County Assessments: 

State Recreation Assessment, 1977 

M.D.C. Sewer Assessment, 1977 

Metropolitan Air Pollution Control, 1977 

Ipswich River Watershed District, 1977 
Sewer Use Control 
Anti-recession Fiscal Funds 
Outside Details 
Sale of Cemetery Lots Fund 
Revenue Reserved Until Collected: 

Motor Vehicle Excise Revenue 

Special Assessments Revenue 

Tax Title & Possession Revenue , 

Departmental Revenue 

Water Revenue 

Sewer Revenue 

State & County Aid to Highways Revenue 
Reserve for Petty Cash Advances 
Appropriation Balances: 
Selectmen, Expenses 
Town Treasurer, Expenses 
Town Hall, Expenses 



12,944 


90 


49 ,689 


29 


364 


01 


1 507 


00 


O , J J u 


Q 1 


11,970 


38 


6^866 


56 


1,820 


40 


94 


94 


84 


91 


1,098 


69 


81,580 


23 


11,253 


68 


92 


18 


4,000 


00 


32,356 


38 


606 


70 


6 


83 


10,696 


73 


29 


79 


103,754 


39 


123,135 


94 


106 


90 



3,859.65 
2,423.61 
55.59 
19.84 



316,859.67 
38,969.20 
133,659.41 
6,811.40 
64,068.58 
1,532.78 
215,097.77 
575.00 

130.00 
409.00 
3,448.02 



100,000.00 
259.96 
114.40 
3.00 



91,879.05 



2,000.25 



93,932.60 



274,785.84 
6,414.00 
210.00 
4,144.29 
36,580.89 
8,026.88 



6,358.69 
20,832.00 
26,605.42 
138.37 
11,095.80 



777,573.81 



131 



LIABILITIES & RESERVES 



Planning Board, Expenses 

Police Department Salaries, Vacation 

Sick Leave 
Extra Detail 
F.B.I. School 

Expenses 
Fire Department Expenses 
Fire Alarm Extension & Outlay 
Civil Defense 

Building Inspector Expenses 
Highway Department Expenses 

Sidewalks 
Chapter 90 Construction 1967 

1968 

1969 

1971 

1976 

1977 

Chapter 90 Maintenance 1977 

Public Street Lights 

Board of Health, Salaries, Other 

Expenses 

Mental Health 

Drug Dependency Problems 

Town Rubbish Removal 
Veterans' Benefits, Aid 
School Department 
Vocational Training 
School Maintenance, Roof Repairs 
Outlay 

School Grounds Maintenance, Outlay 
Public Library Expenses 
Beautif ication Committee 
Historical Commission 
Conservation Commission 
Council on Aging 
Local Transportation 
Outlay - Police Vehicles 
Community School Study Commission 
Sewer Maintenance 

1976 Salary Adjustments & Additional Costs 
Historical Preservation Rounds Property 
Appraisals 

Relocate Shawsheen Ave. Bridge 

Relocate Grove Ave. 

Lay out Industrial & Progress Way 

Local Growth Policy Commission 

Acquisition of Land/Sanitary Purposes 

Veterans' Retirement 

Special Counsel 

Block Grant Law Enforcement Assistance 
Acquire Land for Drainage - Forest Street 
Microfilming & Reader 
Maturing Debt & Interest 
Sewer 

Authentication Fee & Miscellaneous Debt 

Non-Revenue Accounts: 

Woburn Street School Construction 

Woburn Street School Addition 

Shawsheen Avenue School Construction 

West Intermediate School Construction 

Wilmington Memorial Library 

Silver Lake Sewer System 

Water Betterment, Oakwood Road, etc. 

Improvement to Water System 

Water Distribution System N.E. Sector 

Main Street Well Field & Station 

Street Betterments, Ferguson Road 

Lexington Street 
Morningside Drive 
Esquire Estate Completion 
Wilmington Redevelopment Authority 
Town Forest 

Loans Authorized & Unissued 

Appropriation Control, 1978 

Water Available Surplus 

Surplus Revenue 



14,479 


98 


292 


15 


545 


70 


132 


27 


53 


72 


78 


58 


25 


00 


1,397 


37 


3,692 


89 


168 


00 


1,325 


80 


36,497 


99 


9,000 


00 


9,000 


00 


9,450 


00 


637 


23 


37,232 


00 


37,232 


00 


1,545 


57 


19,827 


.81 


96 


00 


15 


00 


2,000 


00 


1,100 


50 


13,750 


00 


2,625 


86 


183,293 


77 


157 


50 


12,159 


37 


7,578 


33 


720 


96 


244 


00 


641 


25 


10,185 


41 


542 


00 


80 


50 


55 


80 


15,633 


50 


420 


98 


4,000 


00 


25,007 


18 


1,303 


00 


13,120 


57 


3,000 


00 


9,054 


01 


400 


00 


638 


55 


5,550 


00 


1,000 


00 


2,786 


90 


2,573 


75 


6,344 


87 


861 


40 


46,625 


00 


4,500 


60 


3,339 


19 


9,156 


61 


43,938 


14 


9,747 


22 


40,410 


41 


58,548 


29 


4,952 


75 


6,094 


09 


259,755 


54 


2,449 


89 


4,876 


68 


10,422 


87 


4,395 


87 


2,721 


28 


17,746 


12 


81,850 


00 



564,667.64 



560,404.95 
6,997,000.00 
14,020,150.23 
106,734.01 
267,019.68 



TOTAL LIABILITIES & RESERVES 



$23,976,931.76 



132 



ANALYSIS OF THE MATURING DEBT 





Balances 


Added 


Paid-Of f 


Ral anppc 

lJdXdLl,L,CO 




7/1/76 


1971 


1977 


6 /30/77 


INSIDE THE DEBT LIMIT 










Wilmington Memorial Library 


285,000 




25 ,000 


260 000 


G/L 44, Sec. 10 $485,000 










Land Acq. Town Forest (1975) 


169,000 




24,000 


145,000 


G/L 44, Sec. 10 $169,000 










Sewer Main Bonds (1971) 


200 ,000 




15 ,000 


185 000 


G/L 44, Sec. 10 $275,000 










Sewer Main Bonds (1973) 


215 ,000 




15 ,000 


200 ,000 


G/L 44, Sec. 10 $264,000 










Urban Renewal Bonds (1971) 


120 ,000 




20 ,000 


100 ,000 


G/L 212B Sec. 20 $200,000 










Acquire Land School Purposes (1972) 


24,720 




12,360 


12,360 


G/L 44, Sec. 10 $61,800 










Street Construction Bonds (1974/75) 


54,568 




13 ,642 


40,926 


G/T 44 Sec 10 $68 210 












1,068,288 




125,002 


943 286 


OUTSIDE THE DEBT LIMIT 










Add S, AT fpr Tr /Sr Hiph School 


5 , 000 




5 ,000 


-0- 


Acts 645/48, $1,375,000 










Add Al tpr Tr /Sr Hieh School 


40 000 




20 000 


20 000 


Acts 645/48, $400,000 












40 000 




20 000 


20 000 


Artq 645/48 S450 000 












80 000 




20 000 


60 000 


Art<5 645/48 $400 000 










NnTt"Vi Tnt"P ttti prlnaf"p ^phnol 

L*) U J. I_ i 1 J. LI L CI i- lllCZVJ, J^d l_ lJ V_ i J W W J_ 


275 ,000 




55 ,000 


220 ,000 


Arts 645/48 $1 050 000 










V d L W i_l O lJ « 1 1 w W _L J. Ll-ZICi^^UO 


3 ,000 




3 ,000 


-0- 


Acts 645/48, $68,425 










WnViiiTn ^1"T"ppt* ^pTinnl 

VVUUU.LL1 lJULCCL. Oi—llUUX 


232 ,000 




30 ,000 


202 ,000 


Acts 645/48, $597,000 










WnKiiTTi ^1"T"ppt" ^r'Viool AHHnt'TO'n 

WtJULlLll OL-l-CCI- OV—llUU-L t\\-x U J_ L- X Wii 


345 ,000 




35 ,000 


310 ,000 


Actq 645/48 $660 000 










Wp Q f" T n t" p T~mpH T ^1 1" p ^pViooI 


625 ,000 




70 ,000 


555 ,000 


Act=; 645/48 $1 445 000 










^Vi ^ThIqVi p pn A'VjPTiiip '^pl^n^l 

lJ L Id W O 1 1 C LL n.VC'LlLJ.C' iJ V_ 1 1 J. 


880 ,000 




110 ,000 


770 ,000 


Art-<? 645/48 $1 674 720 










Shawsheen Ave. School (2nd Issue) 


45,000 




5,000 


40,000 


Acts 645/48, $100,000 










Water Main Bonds (1962) 


10,000 




5,000 


5,000 


Chp. 44, Sec. 8, $86,000 










Water Main Bonds, New Well Field 


150,000 




30,000 


120,000 


Chp. 44, Sec. 8, $463,529 










Salem Street Well Field & Mains 


180,000 




20,000 


160,000 


Chp. 44, Sec. 8, $320,000 










Water Main Bonds (1974/75) 


9,552 




2,388 


7,164 


Chp. 44, Sec. 8, $11,940 










Improv. System N. E. Sector 


465,000 




35,000 


430,000 


Chp. 44, Sec. 8, $500,000 












3,384,552 




465,388 


2,919,164 


COMBINED TOTALS 


4,452,840 




590,390 


3,862,450 



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140 



TRUST FUND ACCOUNTS (>l3>Qni 



Balances 
6/30/76 



Withdrawn 
1976/1977 



Interest 
Added 



Trusts 
Added 



Balances 
6/30/77 



Principal 
Held In 
Trust 



Cemetery Trust Funds 
indover Savings Bank 
Reading Co-Operative Bank 
Reading Savings Bank 

3. D.J. Carter Lecture Fund 

Heading Savings Bank 

tfoburn Five Cent Savings Bank 

Burnap Library Fund 
\ndover Savings Bank 

Senjamin Buck Library Fund 
Andover Savings Bank 

Charlotte C. Smith Library Fund 
Reading Savings Bank 

Sears Cook Walker-Walker 

School Fund 

Reading Savings Bank 

Chester M. Clark Library Fund 
Reading Savings Bank 

Sabra Carter Common Fund 
Andover Savings Bank 

East Wilmington Improvement 
Association Library Fund 
Reading Savings Bank 



2,553.00 
24,651.09 
28,701.47 



5,288.38 
2,458,67 



324.94 



812.85 



945.39 



324.65 



956.17 



298.57 



7,141.16 
74,456.34 



445.10 



20.64 
1,428.55 
1,995.43 



384.75 
25.03 



11,950.00 



6.80 



17.08 



62.10 



18.09 



62.68 



5.36 



470.22 



445.10 



4,496.73 11,950.00 



2,573.64 
38,029.64 
30,696.90 



5,228.03 
2,483.70 



331.74 



829.93 



1,007.49 



342.74 



1,018.85 



303.93 



7,611.38 
90,457.97 



2,175.00 
35,075.00 
20,400.00 



4,578.50 
2,000.00 



200.00 



500.00 



500.00 



257.00 



500.00 



200.00 



3,820. 00 
70,205.50